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    • You need to narrow your shopping to listings or dealers that specifically show the CRIS logo, or at least make mention of terms like "diode circuit for voltage correction". Anything else would be a dumb adapter for using inexpensive standard hearing aid batteries. perhaps order from a known good dealer like B&H? Based on years of experience with Nikon F Photomics: my advice to you is forget the CRIS adapters. The Photomic FTn meter prisms are now almost all dead or innacurrate: those that still work fine are living on borrowed time. Sooner than you might think, their CdS light detection cells and/or coupling resistor will fail on you, and repairs these days are neither cheap nor easy to obtain. The FTn prism requires two CRIS adapters, and IMO at this late stage of FTn lifespan its not worth investing in a pair of expensive adapters unless you also own other cameras you can use them with. The only advantage of CRIS is you can be lazy and neglectful like we were in the old days: i.e., put the camera away for six months, pick it up, and the silver batteries are still good until you pick it up again in another six months. While this is nice, you'll regret the expense if the FTn dies on you unexpectedly. The inexpensive "dumb" metal adapters let you use incredibly cheap zinc air hearing aid batteries: when they expire, just pop a fresh set into the adapters. For even more convenience, choose the double-size FTn-specific adapter that holds two batteries at once: this makes loading them in the finicky clumsy FTn battery chamber easier. The hearing aid batteries are short lived, yes, but it costs nothing to keep a big stash of spares on hand (and you can carry two or four fresh spares in a pod on your camera strap). Really it depends on your battery life priorities and your personal attitude toward pricey adapters. The value of most of my cameras that need mercury batteries is less than the cost of two or three CRIS adapters: the thought of putting such pricey adapters in these cameras just strikes me as peculiar, when a 25 cent zinc battery and cardboard shim works just as well. The only camera I ever considered buying CRIS for is my Nikon Photomic FTns, due to the clumsy battery compartment that is difficult to DIY shim. In the end I went with a double-sized dumb adapter: the FTn meters are just too prone to sudden death for me to invest in a pair of CRIS for each one (I own several FTn cameras). If your Nikon FTn is in really superb cosmetic condition, the ultimate solution is to have it professionally checked out and serviced. During the service, you can request a permanent modification so the meter circuit will run correctly off silver batteries (essentially wiring the meter with the same diode used in the CRIS adapter). This is costly, of course, but if the FTn is your favorite camera the expense to have it overhauled is worthwhile (and gives you peace of mind it should work perfectly for at least a decade). While I do enjoy the build quality and shutter damping of the Nikon FTn, for day-to-day use with a meter prism I find it vastly inferior to the later F2 with either the DP3 or DP12 meter prisms. These cameras, F2SB and F2AS, have silver-battery-powered silicon blue + LED meter circuits that have proved far more long lived and reliable than the CdS/needle prisms made for the F. Worth considering as an alternative/backup camera vs servicing the old FTn prisms.
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