Which Camera(s) to Bring to Italy

Discussion in 'Travel' started by jay_p., Nov 23, 2013.

  1. I'm going to be visiting Rome, Florence, and Venice next month for my wedding anniversary. I'll be there a total of 10 days, and am trying to figure out what camera(s) to bring with.
    Currently, I own the following (yes, I know it's excessive :)):
    • Canon 7D
    • Canon 40D
    • Battery grips for both the 7D and the 40D
    • Canon EF-S 10-22 f/3.5-4.5 USM
    • Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM
    • Canon EF 24-105 f/4L IS USM
    • Canon EF 28-135 f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
    • Canon EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS USM
    • Canon EF 70-300 f/4-5.6 IS USM
    • Canon EF 100 f/2.8 Macro USM
    • Tamron 18-270 f/3.5-6.3 di II VC PZD
    • Tamron 28-300 f/3.5-6.3 XR di VC LD
    • Canon Speedlite 270EX
    • Canon Speedlite 320EX
    • Canon Speedlite 430EX
    • Canon Speedlite 580EX (might be EX II--can't recall)
    • Canon SX40 HS
    • Canon SX260 HS
    • Canon G12
    • Canon SX90 or SX95 (can't recall which one I have)
    I don't want to have to lug around a bunch of equipment so I'm inclined to leave the SLRs and lenses at home. However, I'm not sure whether any of the point & shoots I own will be sufficient. I plan on taking photos for personal use only (though my dream--and it probably is pipe dream--is to eventually sell some of my photographs).
    At this point, I'm thinking the SX40 (with either the Speedlite 320 or 270) probably provides the best balance of quality, versatility, and light weight (maybe brining the S95 or the SX260 as a back-up, pocketable camera). However, I'd like your opinion as to which is the best camera (or combination of camera and lenses) to bring with me.
    Also, from what I've read, the SX50 HS is significantly better than the SX40 so I'm considering buying an SX50 if I can find one on sale around Black Friday. If you believe the SX50 would be a significantly better alternative than the SX40, please also let me know that.
    I've never been to Italy and greatly would appreciate any suggestions you all have to offer. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. I recently went to Italy with one full frame camera, one 24-70 lens, one 70-200 lens, and one speed light. I think I used the speed light once. I did take a tripod.
    Don't take too much stuff, but take what you'll need to cover the core bases. Extra batteries and memory cards are more important than a lot of lenses, IMHO.
     
  3. SCL

    SCL

    WOW you are going to be busy! Without knowing what it is you like to photograph, or anticipate photographing, I'd say go light and enjoy the trip. In my many trips there I always found that 1 body and 2 lenses was all I needed, and often more than I needed. I particularly like a really good wide angle lens - 28-35mm in full frame format, and another lens in the 50-90mm (full frame) range. Unless you will be doing a lot of night shooting (I didn't...that was my time especially for dining and entertainment), you don't need a big honker of a lens. I did some shooting in out of the way churches where, due to the hour of my visit or the design of the church itself, a wider aperture might have been nice, but with a little creativity, not necessary. And I made a particular point of accommodating my wife and periodically putting my camera aside to just enjoy our time together in new surroundings. BTW, I don't want to disabuse you of the idea of selling some shots, but honestly, unless you are extremely talented, creative, and have enormous good luck, everything you see will have been photographed millions of times by others hoping for the big break...so my advice is shoot for yourself, and enjoy what you manage to capture...then plan a return trip to scratch below the surface for all the things you missed during your first trip. And do take advantage of the foods, wines, architecture, and incredible art.
     
  4. Without knowing what it is you like to photograph, or anticipate photographing, I'd say go light and enjoy the trip...​
    I have to agree with this. A few years back I took a 2 week cruise/overland trip to Alaska. After much anguish and soul searching decided to go very light and took just a Canon S3-IS. No regrets at all. Enjoy the trip and don't worry so much about having the right equipment for any possibility.
    http://www.pbase.com/rtope/alaska
     
  5. Presumably you are going for your wedding anniversary, not on a photography trip (and not for professional reasons). Are
    you really going to have a lot of time to shoot the location without your wife? And do you really want to cart around a lot of
    gear WITH your wife? If so she must be pretty understanding.


    You are probably going to be happier going light, but you could bring a DSLR and a couple of lenses for those times when
    you can work a scene and a nice capable point and shoot for when you're just out with your wife. In the old days, that
    pocket camera would have been a Leica CL. These days it might be something like the RX100. But don't take too much.
    Remember why you're there.
     
  6. Sorry, I don't have any experience with contemporary P&Ss. - I am tempted to believe that the 7D should be faster? Does bulk really matter? I mean even with a P&S you'll let go both hands and the mind from your wife to capture something. Some folks seem as occupied shooting with their smartphones as I am with a pair of DSLRs. Its a Leatherman (pocketable & great to have instead of nothing) vs proper screwdriver (faster!) question. Will you feel sore from carrying 7D & 24-105 open + 40D and 70-300 in your bag or backpack? Are your Tamron tourist zooms any good (in your eyes)? - When I went to Rome for 3 days I was happy to have a 20 - 200mm lens line spread over 2 or 3 bodies. - That city is just full of subjects. I don't see much use for the bigger speedlights on a trip. - If you want to go wild pack the smallest with a swivelhead or can you use a even smaller one with wireless sync held in your left hand?
    May I suggest asking your wife how her impression of your presence and preoccupation changes depending on the size of the camera in use? - Are you bearable at all while using a P&S or just cursing and sulking because it doesn't do what you want?
     
  7. My SWMBO seems to enjoy my cameras, but for travel I've still been going mirrorless lately. I'd take the S95 and extra
    batteries.
     
  8. You mentioned an anniversary so photography isn't the primary purpose of the trip. A few years ago my wife and i did a walking tour of Cinque Terre and Tuscany starting in Florence that precluded bringing 20+ pounds of gear. I took a Canon G9, Canon 430 flash along with a Gitzo 0530 tripod and Really Right Stuff BH-25 ball head. The only shortcoming I felt was the desire for a wider angle view for architecture ( the G9 only goes to about 35 mm equivalent). The tripod allowed some nighttime images that I think are some of my best shots of the trip (night time shot of Ponte Vecchio). Also consider a time exposure at night of the Coliseum in Rome. I was concerned whether the G9 would provide good enough quality for larger prints but I ended up with some nice prints (13 x 19) from the trip. Some of the shots of the trip are in my Photonet portfolio. The main point-enjoy the anniversary with your spouse. Given your equipment list maybe pack a surprise gift instead of an extra lens. :))
    p.s. My wife edited this response
     
  9. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

    7D + Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM + G12.
    My 'holiday' kit is a 5D series camera; a 24 to 105/4L IS; and a 35/1.4L; no speedlight; no tripod and a P&S as a backup. People's wants and needs vary - based on what I want and as you don't have a fast wide Prime, I'd just take the 17 to 55/2.8 with the 7D.
    WW
     
  10. 7D, 10-22, 24-104. You'll want the ultrawide for sure.
     
  11. I'd bring the 7D, 17-55, a small speedlite and the G12 for back up. And don't forget a raincoat and something warm to wear. It's december!
     
  12. I would take one body and your two best lenses. Concentrates the mind.
    I envy you your trip. Venice in the mists of winter is beautiful. My main suggestion is you research what you want to see so when you get there you know what you are looking at. I second the warm clothing suggestion.
    http://www.photo.net/photo/12711156
    For Venice get yourselves the water bus passes, get lost in the backstreets but do not forget the islands of the lagoon. Torcello is my fabourite but it may not be yours.
     
  13. My travel formula is one camera (a DSLR with a rechargeable battery and extra memory card), one lens (a wide angle/telephoto zoom), a polarizing filter, a closeup diopter, and several hotel shower caps to act as 'camera raincoats' in the event of rain. On a trip to Ireland a few months ago I also took a table-top tripod and cable release, but I never used them. The camera goes over my shoulder, and everything else is in a fanny pack. I also take an extra memory card and a battery charger. Be careful with the memory card - if you need to change cards, be sure to put the full card in a safe place - DAMHIKT.
    Ten days in Italy, with stops in Rome, Venice and Florence is a very busy trip. Concentrate on the experience - take lots of photos, but don't let yourself be bogged down with equipment.
     
  14. 7D with 10-22 and 24-105 would be my choice from the selection you have (and I might take the 40D along "as backup or replace the 24-105 with the 17-55). In many museums you can't take your bag with you, and in many churches you can forget about bringing in a tripod.
    Went to the same cities almost two years ago - took a D300 with 10.5 fisheye, 11-16/2.8, 16-35/4, 50/1.8 and 85/1.8 the latter two saw hardly any use at all; the 16-35 was my "walkaround lens".
     
  15. Haven't been to Venice (yet) - the other two, yes. In my view, ultra-wides are not a must. The churches are so extremely vast that you really don't need anything to underline how vast they are. I would bring a DSLR though. The P&S cameras are good, but this is a once-in-a-lifetime trip, given the gear you have you seem to like a decent image, so bring something good.
    If you want to keep things light and easy, the DSLR with the Tamron 18-270 makes a compelling case. But interiors are often very dim, and tripods are generally forbidden inside. So, the slow f/6.3 aperture might work against it. Too bad you do not have a fast, wider prime (35 f/2 for example) to cover that. It depends quite a bit how much detail shots you want to make, but I'd probably settle for the 17-55 f/2.8 and 100mm f/2.8. Plus the 7D, without grip.
    In comparison, for Rome and Florence, my main used lenses were a 16-85 f/3.5-5.6, 35mm fast prime, 105mm fast prime (on APS-C Nikon D300). In Rome I carried a 180mm f/2.8, and my back wished I left it at home. Used it for a few shots I could also have managed on 105mm.
    Enjoy, you're going to see absolutely marvellous cities.
     
  16. Wow I've forgotten what it's like to be young enough to think that a DSLR and the 24-105 is a walk around camera. Plus as I said it seems like overkill if you're strolling with your wife.
     
  17. If it would be me and my wedding anniversary I would take only G12 point and shoot, and spend a lot of time walking, holding hands, eating, drinking and doing some other things before taking photos of anything else then my wife.
     
  18. i think it all depends on your endurance. If you have a strong back and are in relatively good health, you can lug equipment around if you choose. For me, I've had a problem with my back since my 20's and it starts to ache when I have my Canon 5D but especially the lenses such as the 24-70 and especially the 85mm portrait lens which I do occasionally...i started to use a top notch point and shoot camera but it just does not compare to an L lense in the Canon family...but people have recommended extra batteries and memory cards which is a must...you may also want to have a way to download those images from a memory card but that's not critical (you could always buy another memory card while on a trip)...i have a large flash unit, the 550EX but wish I had a smaller unit...not sure which one to bring, others will know though...i also like to use a polarizing lenses and occasionally bring graduated density filters...good luck and have a great time....David
     
  19. Thank you all for the responses. I can't believe how many I have received in less than 24 hours!
    FWIW, although I bought the G12 for myself, wife has taken to using it as her camera. Due to carpal tunnel (at least that's the reason she gives me), she doesn't like the small P&S, nor can she handle a DSLR. Consequently, she has found the G12 to be a great compromise. I haven't yet asked her if she plans on bringing the G12 for herself.
    Originally, I was thinking of passing on the 7D and lenses because they weigh so much and take up so much space. i was thinking the SX40 might do the trick because it has so a wide focal range. However, so many of you have suggested that I bring the 7D that I am now having to rethink things. I'm still concerned about the weight and bulk, though. Within the past year or so, I've taken to traveling with the 7D and just one of my Tamron lenses or just using the SX40. Do you think the 18-270 or the 28-300 would be fast enough for indoors when flash is not allowed?
    I originally bought the 7D because I shoot a lot of photos at my kids' sporting events and the high frame rate is great for that. I'm figuring, though, that I won't need much burst on my trip. Is that an accurate assumption?
    Another specific question: For this trip, will I need long focal length? If not, what is the longest length you think I need (if I bring the 7D)?
    I'd still appreciate some comments as to whether the SX40 (or an SX50) would be a good compromise.
    At this point, I'm thinking the s95 would be good to bring as a back-up because it is so small.
    Additional info: We will be taking a private tour of the Vatican and will be visiting the Coloseum and Trevi Fountain while in Rome. I can't recall the rest of our itinerary but will post that info later, after I've spoken about it with my wife.
    Thanks again for all the responses!
     
  20. I shoot Nikon, but when I was last in Italy and Venice, I travelled light. My camera was a DSLR, DX sensor, D300s, lens used the most, 16-85mm f3.5-5.6; second lens was a fast prime lens for inside locations (museums and churches) , like a 20mm, 35mm or a 50mm, your choice. Why prime? So it is small that it fits inside my pants pocket or jacket pocket so I do not take a camera bag with me while I am walking around Italy. Camera and small profile zoom lens goes over my shoulder and is hidden by my jacket. I had two tripods with me--a regular one that I used in early morning when most cities were deserted, and a pocket sized one that I used when necessary inside churches and other locations when I did not want to be seen with a regular tripod. This pocket sized tripod is a must have in Europe as far as I am concerned. My regular camera bag stayed in my hotel most of the time as I did not want to identify myself as a photographer in Italy. I left my flash at home. In Venice make sure you go to the islands around the city like Murano. Joe Smith
     
  21. IMHO December (winter but before Carnival) is the ideal time to visit Venice, because there will be far less tourists and also because the peculiar light conditions (exactly like in the paintings by Canaletto). These conditions however also do pose a serious challenge to photography. Everything will be grey and hazy, without shadows and contrast, and photos thus risk coming out rather dull and flat. My suggestion is to select your equipment carefully in view of these conditions, and then try and use them to advantage rather than fighting a hopeless war against them.
     
  22. To clarify: these are the typical light conditions you are likely to encounter.
    00cBQD-543764984.jpg
     
  23. I'm figuring, though, that I won't need much burst on my trip. Is that an accurate assumption?​
    I do need the fast burst - to acquire the bracketed exposures for HDR (using a Nikon D300 or D700, it takes five shots to span the -2 to +2 EV range).
    For this trip, will I need long focal length? If not, what is the longest length you think I need (if I bring the 7D)?​
    Obviously, I can't say if YOU need it - I usually don't. But it means that I am missing some detail shots I would have gotten otherwise.
    I want to emphasize again that many museums (the Vatican museum for sure) will not let you in with a camera bag - whatever you need inside, you need to carry without a bag. You can check the bag at the entrance - something I didn't want to do so I missed the Vatican museum (and one or two others).
    I would bring a DSLR though. The P&S cameras are good...​
    Another point I need to emphasize - for myself I made the decision that I want to bring the best gear I can when traveling and rather compromise on the lens selection than starting with a camera that I don't feel is up to the task. After all, I can't easily go back for a re-shoot (and whatever P&S I used left me wanting for something better). Looking back at my trip to Italy, I could easily have gotten away with the 16-85 and 11-16 on my D300 (or the 16-35 but it would only have added bulk and weight without added benefits).
    Having said that - the new Sony RX-10 looks like a traveler's dream camera: 24-200 equivalent at f/2.8 throughout and with image stabilization, 1-inch sensor (like the Nikon 1 Series), less than two pounds - it's not inexpensive though.
     
  24. My daughter is in Florence now for school and just visited Rome. It's a lot rainier than she is used to being from just outside of Los Angeles. I'm still wondering about kitting up for a trip in February. I tend to agree with those advocating simpler kits with fewer lenses, etc. We'll have a similar length trip and likely hit Rome, Florence and maybe up to Austria for a couple of days. With the moving around, it seems that a simpler kit that I can just keep in one "bag" will work better than trying to take too much and trying to pare down for a given day from a larger kit bag, etc.
    I'm torn on taking a longer zoom because I don't know that the pace will allow for a lot of time to be swapping out the lenses to catch small or distant details, etc., and then back to wider lenses for more general architectural and scenic subjects. If I compare to a trip to Washington DC a while back, I never used the 70-300 and almost never used the tripod except in other spots on the trip. Same with a flash - but not having been there, I can't help but think I might need/want them and even perhaps a travel tripod.
     
  25. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

    “I've taken to traveling with the 7D and just one of my Tamron lenses or just using the SX40. Do you think the 18-270 or the 28-300 would be fast enough for indoors when flash is not allowed? . . . I'm figuring, though, that I won't need much burst on my trip. Is that an accurate assumption? Another specific question: For this trip, will I need long focal length? If not, what is the longest length you think I need (if I bring the 7D)? I'd still appreciate some comments as to whether the SX40 (or an SX50) would be a good compromise.”

    The 18 to 270 would be fast enough for me “indoors when flash is not allowed”, because I would, not be using it for Portraiture and I would be using it for mainly Architecture and at the wider end of the zoom: I would prefer slightly wider than 18mm, though. The 28 to 300 would definitely NOT be wide enough for me.
    I don’t think I have used burst mode on holidays ever.
    I’d like about 135 on a 7D, but I would like that with speed. I use 5D’s and ideally I would like a 24 to 200F/2.8 zoom: my compromise is a 24 to 105 F/4 IS. It’s all about compromise if you want to take only one lens: you can crop a bit out of the 7D: I crop a truckload out of some shots when I have to use 105 and it is not long enough.
    I use a PowerShot SX40HS as my holiday backup camera. Although I know the camera well and I believe that I can push it to the limits: I would not use it as my first camera for several reasons: some are - I really like only using available light; I like making portraits; I like indoor architecture – these are all a lot easier with my 24 to 105/4 IS on a 5D series camera, than using the SX40HS. I do use the movie facility of the Powershot, rather than making movie with the DSLR.
    Some of these are shot in Italy: http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=1051323
    As you might note – shooting Available Light you can quickly get to the region of F/4 @ 1/8th @ ISO3200.
    WW
     
  26. Just to emphasize key points: flash is not allowed for inside shooting; anything that looks like a large bag or backpack, sometimes even a very small one, will have to be checked when you enter a museum, some public buildings, etc. Hence the recommendations above to go small and light in Italian cities, and other European cities too. If you want to take a longer lens, use it in the early am or late afternoon. I would not take it with me during the day as it will make your kit too large.
    Joe Smith
     
  27. Just to emphasize key points: flash is not allowed for inside shooting; anything that looks like a large bag or backpack, sometimes even a very small one, will have to be checked when you enter a museum, some public buildings, etc. Hence the recommendations above to go small and light in Italian cities, and other European cities too. If you want to take a longer lens, use it in the early am or late afternoon. I would not take it with me during the day as it will make your kit too large.
    Joe Smith
     
  28. david_henderson

    david_henderson www.photography001.com

    I can't see the point of buying quality equipment if you don't take it to places where you're likely to get good photographs. That said I'd pare down the kit to that which I could keep in one medium sized bag- one dslr, a compact or similar for backup and whenever a dslr prejudices the ability to photograph , and two lenses. Its not a question of whether the locations demand a longer lens, its a question of whether you do. Personally I find a longer zoom very useful in cities but I have the f4 70-200 IS which is smaller and lighter than your equivalent.
    Tripod? Well I always take one and for landscapes etc I use it all the time. In cities it tends to stay in my hotel unless I need it. I'll often carry a tripod on dawn/evening walks but leave it behing if I've got bright light to play with or if I'm going to locations where a tripod is likely to create issues for me.
    Anyway much of this depends oon whether you'll be walking alone or with a tour group or even with a group of family/friends that will dictate your pace. If the latter two I've never felt able to photograph as I would like and either not photograph or settle for a compact.
     
  29. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

    I've have had no problems in public buildings in Europe with a Lowepro Slingshot Bag: the fact that one can sling and carry it on the belly excludes it from being prohibited in buildings where "backpacks" are prohibited.
    WW
     
  30. I know Venice very well and have visited many times in all seasons. Winters can be very bright and very cold or a dank mist can settle on the place. I cancelled one December trip because 70% of the pavements were under water following torrential rain and a particularly high acqua alta! But Venice remains the most beautiful and enchanting city. One thing is sure. You get your best experience walking, especially off the beaten track. Get a vaporetto ticket for 3 days or a week and jump on and off as often as you like. But most of the time you will be on small side canals away from the vap routes. When I go now, I usually spend a few days and never go anywhere near St Mark's or the Rialto, preferring to stick to non-tourist districts. If you want to see St Mark's get there early in the morning, especially if there are any ghastly cruise ships in port! I usually take one DSLR and a couple of lenses covering wide angle to standard and standard to say 135mm. I always have a backup (now a Fuji X100). You will learn that there are 3 prices for most things in Venice. Cheap for Venetians, a little more for non-Venetian Italians and much more for non-Italians! A fun place to sit out in the evening and enjoy a spritzer is the Campo Santa Margherita in the University area. 25% of the price of St Mark's square and full of locals.
    00cBYf-543780584.jpg
     
  31. 7D 17-55 and 70-300mm - you're done. If you must, take the G12 as backup.
    Another alternative is the 10-22 and 24-105mm combination. I would like the f2.8 at least somewhere though. Certainly, the 300mm of the 70-300mm is unlikely to get much use. I've been to Italy a lot in the past.
    You don't need flashes.
     
  32. If you end up taking a DSLR, I've been impressed by the modern sling straps like the Black Rapid ones that let you sling the SLR to your side, even under your coat and have it seem a bit less heavy and awkward. I have some pretty bad back problem, and I experimented last weekend slinging the Canon 5D and 24-105 on the Cotton Carrier belt strap and it felt pretty good. I also tried it on the Black Rapid and it was much less of a strain on my back than it would have been around my neck. The belt system from Cotton Carrier was easiest on my back but the Black Rapid was faster to bring up and take a shot.
    If I was traveling, I would leave the neck straps behind and take something better.
     
  33. Forgive me if somebody's already said this, but if you want there to be another wedding anniversary, leave it all at home and concentrate on the reason you're there -- your spouse. If my wife and I went on a trip like this and I spent the entire time taking pictures, I'd be taking the next trip by myself. :)
     
  34. If we went on a once-in-a-lifetime trip to a place like Venice it would be my wife who was all over me about what camera I was bringing and would want to make sure I was well-armed, and would be upset with me if I didn't have one handy to record something she wanted to remember. It's about the partnership - don't forget to ask your spouse what they want.
     
  35. Yes, as Harry said "acqua alta" (high water = flooding) can be a major problem in Venice in winter. Unfortunately it is completely unpredictable, unless with a few hours' warning. If it is relatively mild (say, no more than 20-30cm above the pavement), you can simply buy (NOT IN VENICE!!!) a pair of rubber boots, but if it goes higher then a trip to Venice becomes highly unpractical. If you already are in the area and must skip Venice, then please be aware that the neighbouring towns (Verona, Padua, Mantua, to a lesser degree Vicenza) are also very beautiful tourists' attractions on their own.
     
  36. I would take one body and your two best lenses. Concentrates the mind.​
    Great advice!
    In my view, ultra-wides are not a must.​
    Agreed. They distort architecture badly. A lightweight telephoto for capturing portraits and distant details would be more useful.
    As mentioned by others, here's another good reason to pack lightly. Venice floods.
    Also, many of the big tourist sites in Italy won't let you in with a backpack. Whatever camera gear you want to carry, you'll need to carry by hand.
    00cC1a-543838584.jpg
     
  37. Thank you all so much for your continued feedback.
    The more I think about things (especially this being my anniversary trip and not a photography excursion), the less inclined I am to bring my 7D and, instead, to stick with something simple. My reasons for this include: (a) I don't want to have to worry about changing lenses while touring, (b) I don't want to carry the weight and bulk of the 7D and lenses, and (c) I don't want to be concerned about bag restrictions. At this point, the only reasons why I would bring the 7D are: (a) using a fast lens like my 17-55 f/2.8, I could take photos indoors without a flash and (b) using the Tamron 18-270, I could cover a large focal range.
    This morning I was doing a little pre-Black Friday window shopping online and discovered that Canon has made, what appear to be, some significant upgrades to the s-line since I bought my s95 and to the G-line since I bought my G12 (I really haven't been following the camera market the last few years). In particular, the G16 and s120 have caught my eye (I also notice that B&H has really good deals on the G15 and s110). So, now I am thinking that perhaps if I upgrade the s95 or the G12 and just bring the new camera, that would suffice for my purposes (at this point, keepsake photos that, perhaps, I would want to blow up to 20x30 and frame to hang in my house).
    With all that in mind, I greatly would appreciate your input as to whether an s-Series or G-Series camera would suffice for the trip. Some specific questions I have are:
    1. Will I notice a difference between the s95 and the s120 or between the G12 and the G16? Is the difference worth the price of the upgrade costs?
    2. Between the s120 and the G16, which would you recommend purchasing and why? (At this point, I'm leaning toward the G16 because at f/1.8 (W) - 2.8 (T) versus f/1.8 (W)- f/5.7 (T) for the s120, the G16 should be better in low light situations, which is I concern I have.)
    3. Is there any point to me considering the G15 ($299 at B&H this weekend) or s110 ($249 at B&H this weekend) instead of the G16 or s120? If so, which one?
    4. If I were to bring a G16 (or my G12 if I don't upgrade) or the s120 (or my s95 if I don't upgrade) to Italy and leave my DSLRs at home, would you recommend I bring the HS260 or SX40 too just to cover long distances if need be? (Conveniently, the SX40 and G16 use the same battery :))
    Any other input you have regarding these cameras would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you all again for your responses. Happy Thanksgiving!
     
  38. "p.s. My wife edited this response"
    LOL
     
  39. With all that in mind, I greatly would appreciate your input as to whether an s-Series or G-Series camera would suffice for the trip.​
    There is no right or wrong answer to that - just your own personal preference. If you have decided not to take the DSLR and lenses then the G or S series cameras are reasonably capable. Personally , as a 5D II and G12 owner I would always take the DSLR on such a trip as I like to get the best possible quality images I can. I agree with David Henderson when he asks why own this gear and then not take it with you? I would only take the G12 where the DSLR would just be impractical.

    With the G12 I would miss the wide angles below 28mm and the telephoto beyong 140mm. I would also miss the top end of the ISO range. But the G12, for example, should get you some decent photos but perjaps not the best you could have got with the DSLR. But if the G12 or whatever, suits your priorities for the trip then that is what you should take.

    Whatever you decide have a great time!
     
  40. Leave the wife at home and take all the gear you own. :)
     
  41. @Jim Downs, although your response brought a smile to my face, I don't think my wife would be with me much longer if I did this. It's actually our 20th anniversary, and I promised her this trip something like 19 years ago (for our first anniverary)--we just never made. Because this trip is so special for her and because she puts up with me constantly dragging my collection of cameras and lenses pretty much wherever we go, I figure that for two weeks I could focus on her and not the photography. Hence, after some soul-searching, I have come to the conclusion that the photographs I take will be for our personal use, to remember the trip, not for my perfectionist tendancies. That is why I now am so heavily leaning against the 7D. Still trying to figure out whether it is worth buying a G16 and bringing that rather than going with the G12, S95, the SX160, or the SX40. I know all of those are slower in operation than the 7D but they are significantly lighter and take up far less space. From what I have read, the G16 is supposed to be much faster (not only in terms of aperture but also auto-focus and operation) than the prior G models so I'm hoping it will come closer to the 7D than what I've got with the other P&S cameras in my collection.
     
  42. Hi, All. I'm sorry if I'm beating a dead horse, but I need to make a decision as to whether I'm going to bring one of my existing cameras and buy something new.
    Today, I called Adorama to inquire about my options. When I placed the call, I was heavily leaning toward buying a G16 and bringing that, along with the SX40 (for distance shots), with me on the trip. However, the salesman recommended that I go with the G1 X instead so I now I'm really confused. The G1 X seems as though it generally has a better IQ than the G16 and might be better in low light (though I'm not certain if that's the case) but it apparently is not as fast with the autofocus and doesn't handle macro well (I love taking macro shots so that is a big minus). Any thoughts on the G16 vs. G1 X--which would be better for the trip and why?
    Thanks again!
     
  43. Did you have a look at a M4/3 camera. Not much bigger than the Canon G modells, larger sensor and excellent lenses.
     
  44. G1-X will be better in some ways as it has a larger sensor, but the lens is not so fast as the G16. Personally I don't see what's wrong with taking the 7D or the 40D with just the 17-55 f2.8 which you already own. There is no reason whatsoever to take more lenses if you don't want to. The 17-55 is really good and will cover pretty well everything you would want to take and, if it doesn't, you can't take the shot (so what? You probably couldn't take it with the G16 either). I think you are wasting brain power on a simple issue. If you don't want to change lenses: don't bring any others.
     
  45. I took the SX40 on my latest trip to Arizona, it was nice to travel light, did not miss a DSLR :)
     
  46. @Stefan T., I have not looked at the M4/3 cameras, in large part because I have considered them as money pits. I say that only because I am concerned that if I buy an M4/3, it only will lead me down the path of spending more money on lenses and other accessories.
    One of the reasons I am so attracted to the G16 and G1X is that I already have an assortment of compatible equipment, including extra batteries and chargers (the SX40, G16, and G1X all use the same battery) and Canon Speedlites. As a result, if I go with a G16 or G1X, I don't have to worry about buying those accessories. Plus, as an added bonus, if decide to go with just the G16 or G1X, I can bring along the SX40 and swap batteries.
     
  47. G1-X will be better in some ways as it has a larger sensor, but the lens is not so fast as the G16. Personally I don't see what's wrong with taking the 7D or the 40D with just the 17-55 f2.8 which you already own. There is no reason whatsoever to take more lenses if you don't want to. The 17-55 is really good and will cover pretty well everything you would want to take and, if it doesn't, you can't take the shot (so what? You probably couldn't take it with the G16 either). I think you are wasting brain power on a simple issue. If you don't want to change lenses: don't bring any others.​
    Thanks, Robin. I just listed all the responses so far that deal only with the equipment I already own. There is a strong consensus that I should bring the 7D and 17-55 f/2.8 (including two responses that I bring the G12 as a back-up). A second group has recommended the 7D, the 10-22 and the 24-105. Tomorrow or Friday, I'll take out the 7D, the 17-55, the 10-22, the 24-105, and (just for kicks) the 18-270 to see how they compare weight-wise. At this point, I'm guessing the 24-105 will simply be more weight than I want to carry (especially if I throw in the 10-22). I'm not sure how heavy the 17-55 will be so I'll want to give that a try. If I were to add a second lens with the 17-55, I think it would be the 18-270.
    My told me she wants to bring a camera herself. As I previously mentioned, she has claimed the G12 as hers so I am still toying with the idea of buying a G16 (or the s120) for myself and bringing it as my back-up and walk around camera in case I don't want to bring the 7D somewhere.
     
  48. I took the SX40 on my latest trip to Arizona, it was nice to travel light, did not miss a DSLR :)
    I've been pretty pleased with the SX40 as an all-purpose travel camera. When I went to California last September, I left everything at home except the SX40 and got some very nice shots at Hearst Castle. It especially does well outdoors.
     
  49. "@Stefan T., I have not looked at the M4/3 cameras, in large part because I have considered them as money pits. I say that only because I am concerned that if I buy an M4/3, it only will lead me down the path of spending more money on lenses and other accessories.
    One of the reasons I am so attracted to the G16 and G1X is that I already have an assortment of compatible equipment, including extra batteries and chargers (the SX40, G16, and G1X all use the same battery) and Canon Speedlites. As a result, if I go with a G16 or G1X, I don't have to worry about buying those accessories. Plus, as an added bonus, if decide to go with just the G16 or G1X, I can bring along the SX40 and swap batteries."
    That's a real good reason!
     
  50. I just came back fro Italy last month, with the same itinerary (Rome-Florence-Venice). All I needed was a Sony NEX6 and 16-50mm. I would suggest something similar, if not the same.
     
  51. Keith L, Dec 07, 2013; 12:36 p.m.
    I just came back fro Italy last month, with the same itinerary (Rome-Florence-Venice). All I needed was a Sony NEX6 and 16-50mm. I would suggest something similar, if not the same.​
    Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately, the NEX6 is more than I wanted to spend for what will end up being my fifth P&S camera purchased in the last four years or so (it appears to be about $750 for body and 16-50mm lens). After quite a bit of soul-searching, I decided to pull the trigger on the G16. I put the 17-55mm lens on the 7D and held it for awhile. I wouldn't feel comfortable bringing just the 17-55mm and thought I would want something else with more reach--either the SX40 or the Tamron 18-270 or Tamron 28-300. Ultimately, I concluded that was more bulk than what I wanted. After reading numerous reviews and comparing the specs, I believe (hope?) I will see a significant improvement between the G16 and the G12 and that the G16 will hold its own for most of my needs on the trip (if my wife weren't planning on using the G12, I might have gone ahead and just brought the G12). I do want to bring somethign with a bit more distance just in case so now I'm just deciding between the SX260 and the SX40. The SX260 has the advantage of being significantly smaller than the SX40; I often will wear it in a belt case. On the other hand, the SX40 has a much further reach, can take almost twice as many shots on one battery charge than the SX260 (400 vs. 230), and uses the same battery and charger as the G16 so I would only need to bring one battery charger and wouldn't have to worry about ever running out of juice (I already have two batteries for the SX40, and the G16 comes with two batteries). Hmmm....decisions, decisions, decision..... Thank you all again for your responses and input!
     
  52. Leave everything else than:
    • Canon 7D
    • Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM
     
  53. Late to this party, but without a doubt, I'd take the 10-22 and 18-270. That will give you any flexibility you'd need, and with the 7D's noise performance, you could crank your ISO as high as necessary and still get very useable personal shots.
     
  54. Travel VERY light. It will concentrate your mind and relieve your shoulder, feet, etc.
     

Share This Page