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Olympus OM2n - Photo Blur


jimnorwood
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(snip)

 

Environmental impact is an interesting theme which I know too little about. Has it been proven that buying and using a used film camera has greater environmental impact than the manufacture of a new digital film camera ? One would think so but I suspect it's not so clear cut.

 

(snip)

 

Maybe not, but there are plenty of used DSLRs around!

 

Not quite as low price as many film SLRs, but still plenty low enough.

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-- glen

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As mentioned above, it might be that the aperture isn't closing fast enough.

 

Or maybe sometimes it is and sometimes not. That would result in overexposure,

and also less depth of field.

 

With scanned negatives, or prints from negatives, it is hard to judge exposure.

If you look at the negatives, some might be very dark, and others not so dark.

 

There is also color correction in scanning or printing, which can be off, and

so cause not so blue sky.

 

We can't tell which part of the scene was meant to be in focus.

One reason SLRs work as well as they do, is that we usually focus with

the lens wide open, and then, often enough, expose stopped down.

 

The increased depth of field makes up for getting the focus a

little bit off. If it isn't closing down, or intentionally is at full

aperture, then less depth of field.

-- glen

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Maybe not, but there are plenty of used DSLRs around!

 

Not quite as low price as many film SLRs, but still plenty low enough.

Nikon D2X and an F6 were released the same time. The D2X was twice or more the price of the F6 at the time. Today in similar condition the F6 cost a lot more than the D2X.

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Last year, I bought a used D1X for $40. The original price was over $4000, so a 100x decrease.

(I already had the battery and charger, as that was not included.)

 

The camera I use most lately is a D200, though I have a D700.

Used D200 are in the $100 range. And the D200 has an AI

coupler, so you can use older lenses and practice manual focusing.

(My best deal on a used Nikon lens is an AI 80-200 zoom for $11.)

 

The D200 has plenty of bits for more everyday uses, family trips, and such.

The D1X is slightly bigger and heavier, one reason not to use it so much.

 

All mine us CF cards, which are not so easy to find new, but I have also

bought some used. (Some with pictures on them!)

 

There are also CF to SD adapters. I have used those, but now I

have enough actual CF cards.

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-- glen

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  • 3 weeks later...

Pictures look like film--which I suppose is a plus. They are perhaps a little overexposed or printed that way (I suspect more the latter). Most sharpness issues are camera shake. Shutter speeds are less than say 1/125th. Opening the aperture up will solve that, and keep an eye on the shutter speed. Make sure to hold the camera steady (there's is an art to it). Make sure the photographer can really see the screen (do they wear glasses? or are they long sighted?) they might need a viewfinder diopter to ensure the camera's focusing screen can be sharply imaged by their eye. Make sure the subject is in focus using the microprism spot (you have to be able to accurately image it in your eye otherwise your focus may not be precise enough).

Edited by Robin Smith
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Robin Smith
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