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    • There is a thread already in Photonet (2003) about the Dacora Royal, however it is very brief and I wish to post a more detailed description of this light weight, easily handled camera, easy once the lever advance is mastered. I bought the camera believing that one stroke of the lever, as well as cocking the shutter, also indexed the image frames, but that wasn't the case. The lever cocks the shutter at the very end of it's stroke, and it pulls the film through at the same time, but not to the next frame number. The lever must be continually rotated to bring the next frame number to view in the red window at the back of the camera. The cocking mechanism is quite ingenious, a lot of thought must have gone into it. It starts out with rotation of the winding lever spindle, which actuates an intermediate pressed metal bar, rotating on it's axis, and finally this bar pushes on a pivoting quadrant, which has a pin on it pressing against the shutter's cocking lever. As the quadrant moves across, it takes the cocking lever with it. When cocking the shutter, the resistance on the film winding lever, at the end of it's stroke, is considerable. A new owner would be forgiven if the winding lever was thought to be at the end of it's stroke when that resistance was first felt. If the shutter cocking is missed, there is ample chance to cock the shutter before the next frame number appears in the red window, but it must be done before then, otherwise a frame is lost. The Dacora Royal has an uncoupled rangefinder, worked by a dial wheel as seen just in front of the winding lever handle, which is notched so the distance numbers on the dial can be more easily viewed, and of course, the readings are manually transferred to the front cell of the lens. Double exposures are possible if the thin cocking lever can be pushed over to cock the shutter using a tooth pick or similar, it's quite easy to push over. The shutter button is fairly smooth to press, it's a nice action that doesn't cause any camera shake. There is also a self-timer for getting in your own picture, which I often do, or for eliminating camera shake while the camera is on a tripod and a cable release may not be available at the time.   Two recent pics from this rather well kept 6x6 Dacora Royal, home processed   I should mention the Royal has a three element Dignar coated lens. Shutter has top speed 200 and f4.5 to f16
    • Laughing Gull  
    • Canon GR 80TP
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