Resources for inspiration, education and 'how-to' tutorials

Discussion in 'Education' started by mikemorrell, May 18, 2020.

  1. There are very many different books, e-learning courses, websites and Youtube channels that give useful tips on photography and post-processing. You can find all of them via an internet search engine, depending on what you're looking for. After a couple of years, I've found that I prefer some authors, websites and Youtube channels to others. Because - to my taste - they consistently offer high-quality, concise and easy-to-follow tutorials.

    My first thought was to post a list of my personal favourite 'go to' websites and Youtube channels for photography and especially post-processing. I will do this and I do hope that other members will add their favourite books and online resources to this thread too!

    But of course, there are already 'best photography resource' lists out there that include most of the ones I was going to link to anyway. Just by quickly browsing just a sample these others look really good too. So I'm kicking off this thread with links to these lists. BEar in mind that for each Youtube channel, you do need to look at their various 'Playlists' to find topics that interest you. One Playlist may include interviews with photographers, Others may include photography tips for different genres and another may include post-processing tips.

    Disclaimer: I have no idea whether these lists are the 'best ones' out there. I cannot personally vouch for the selection of links on each list (I do note some glaring omissions). But I like at least some of the ones they've included. On the lists of books and Youtube channels, it's well worth comparing lists and looking at those that are highly rated on multiple lists.

    Feel free to discuss, add to, recommend or criticize any of the resources in these lists!

    Mike

    Books:
    - best 2020 photography book list at digitalcameraworld.com
    - best photography book list at pixpa.com
    - list of best photography books of all time at phlearn.com
    - list best photography books at shotkit.com

    Free on-line learning courses: list at vocal.media

    Websites:list at creativebloq.com

    YouTube channels:
    - list at format.com
    - list at halfhalftravel.com
     
  2. OK now I can add my personal preferences:

    Books:
    My personal favourites are 'The Photographer's Eye' (mentioned in multiple lists) and 'The photographer's vision' by Michael Freeman. There may be well be better books but these two books have inspired me - and have had a greater influence on my photography - than any other books that I've come across, courses that I've followed, websites that I've visited or YouTube videos that I've watched. The first book focuses mainly on composition, framing and timing. The second - following a short but illuminating review of 'the qualities of a truly great photo' focuses more on the photographers 'vision', intention and how he/she step-by-step transforms this into a photo (or photo-series). Freeman's books are non-technical but discuss the intentional and compositional aspects of photography and full of examples that illustrate his points. One of the things I like is that he also includes very similar photos that didn't quite make the grade. He discusses why and how he made the 'final grade' selection..Another thing I like about Freeman's book is that they are not ego-trips but are written from a genuine wish to share his personal knowledge beliefs and experience in photography. At no point does he pretend that he has 'the answer' or 'the method'. He just shares his insights, opinions an experience. As a Brit (as is Freeman) I found it so refreshing to find his books that are centred not him as a 'well-known photographer' but on photography.

    Photography

    To be honest, I don't visit many photography websites other than photo.net and the (valuable) links that members share. Ye, I also have 500px, Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest, and Tumblr accounts too. From time to time I dip into these too. Personally, I seldom find these inspirational. Usually''more of the same'. I also have Twitter and Facebook accounts that sometimes lead me to photography websites. Via Twitter, (for photography) I most often end up on Fstoppers or Petapixel.com. This is completely arbitrary. Somewhere along the line I decided to 'follow' these two feeds. If others had been 'recommended' by Twitter I would have followed them too. But photography is not my main interest on Twitter (or Facebook or Instagram or Facebook).

    Post Processing (PP)
    I take exclusively digital, neutral, RAW photos and I always do some PP on the best of these. Yes, I really should have taken extensive courses on how best to use Lightroom and Photoshop but I stubbornly persisted that I could just 'learn by doing'. To a large extent this has worked. Whenever I ran into something that I didn't quite know how to do, I j ust ''googled' my question and found an answer. 'Adobe and PHlearn (YouTube) quickly became my 'go to' resources on PP. Of course I still 'google' questions that these sources don't answer. I've never yet posed a question via internet that didn't (eventually) turn up an effective answer/solution via YouTube.

    Using a search engine to find out what you what to find out is always good - I much prefer the 'learning by doing' approach for many reasons - but I also see its limitations. At a certain point, you'll discover PP opportunities that 'learning by doing' didn't indicate. Then's the time (IMHO) to back up and get a wider perspective of what's possible with PP. With this overview you can then then better zoon in on the 'how to' tutorials.

    Mke
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2020

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