New Nikon ES-2 Film Digitizing Adapter

Discussion in 'Film and Processing' started by iosif_astrukov, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. Older Nikon 60 mm Micro lenses had a 52 mm thread. The newest versions have a 62 mm thread. The straight end of the longer tube slides into the ES-2 and is used to adjust the focus, held by the thumb screw (the ES-1 is only held by friction). The shorter tube is probably a 52-62 step-up adapter.

    The film strip holder looks very much like the cheaper versions I bought, hoping to use them in the ES-1. They're still handy for use on a flatbed, a copy table or my Novoflex copy setup. I'll know more when my ES-2 arrives.
     
  2. Yeah, I remember that you told me in the other thread that for DX cameras, you have to add a tube between the 1:1 macro lens and the slide adapter. In the review by Rockwell (Nikon 40mm f/2.8 DX Micro-NIKKOR) we see that it can photograph until 24mm long, well, in fact 23mm, but we need to take a picture of a 36mm frame, don't we? So why doesn’t the Nikon employee of the Q&A page mention this?

    Tom Halfhill, when you use the 40mm with the ES-1, do you see the whole frame, including the borders, or the frame is cropped?
     
  3. Tom Halfhill - I personally don't like 'adjusting' such things myself, like you described and 'handmade' it… but… everyone is deciding for themselves

    I guess Nikon added extenders and adapters so that you can use the ES-2 set with all kind of lenses and bodies - DX/FX, & 40, 60, 85, 105 micro and etc… depending on what you have

    the ES-1 has ability to extend also, but for example not enough to use the 105 micro lens - beside the 1:1 magnification (that all new micro Nikon lenses have) the closest focusing distance mind too… also if you decide to use an FX lens on a DX body… I guess the new ES-2 set cover all options, including all kind of film (35mm)
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
  4. It's a slip tube, so you have to adjust it every time you put it on the camera, both for focus and angle. The set screw should help (the ES-1 doesn't have that), but I suspect it will still get knocked out of alignment.

    Focusing is easy if you have live view, especially with magnification for fine focusing. At 1:1 the focus ring on the lens is useless. The only means of focusing is the slide adapter. If you are willing to part with a millimeter or so of the film frame, you can defocus the lens, adjust the slide holder, then touch up the focus with the lens helix. You want it grain-sharp, which can be difficult to achieve with the film holder alone. Even so, the cardboard mount still crops more than using less than 1:1.

    For those who are compulsive about seeing the sprocket holes, these devices won't work. Get a life, or get a different film holder ;)

    You would need at least 3" of extension to use a 105 mm macro. That would require two complete sets of Nikon K tubes. theoretically you would need 4" extension, but the Nikon 105 shortens the focal length as you get closer, in order to keep the lens "growth" to a minimum. At 1:1, it's something like 75 MM, not 105. I don't think extensions would be necessary for a 40 mm DX, 55 FX or 60 FX.

    The Nikon Q&A page doesn't answer questions unless someone asks. That's where PNEt comes in.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
  5. For 40 years the only filter sizes I needed was 39 mm (Leica) and 52 mm (Nikon). Nikon's f/2.8 zooms are all 77 mm. Now I'm faced with 39, 52, 62, 67, 72, 77, 82, 93 ... I've lost count. You can count on the Japanese to use the same turn signal/headlight dimmer configuration on all makes of car, but Sony changes filter sizes like I change socks.
     
  6. I am personally not interested in seeing the sprocket holes, but I like to see the borders of the negative frames. I don’t like a piece of plastic to crop who knows where inside the image. Call it OCD, I don’t get offended. Do Nikon holders show you the borders, or do they crop by themselves? My Epson holders, for example, show me the borders, and they don’t have vertical plastic separations between frames. But they are not compatible with slide adapters. Also, Epson’s are not good when the negative is bent, they don’t hold it flat enough. In this respect, I read that Plustek’s are good, and also Better Scanning’s. But I don’t know about the Nikon ones.

    So, in conclusion, as far as I understood, extension is needed, but the one that the adapter offers is enough, even though the information given by the Nikon page is incomplete, and despite the fact that, previously, you thought extension tubes were needed. Is this correct?

    It would be interesting that Tom confirms us this suspicion.
     
  7. There seems to be much confusion about using the ES-1 with a Nikkor 40mm f/2.8 macro lens on a DX body. I'm seeing misguided advice from people who apparently have never used this combination. Let me clarify:

    1. No adapters, extension tubes, or additional gizmos of any kind are required to copy mounted slides. The ES-1 screws directly into the lens' 52mm filter thread. All you need is a DX body, the 40mm lens, and the ES-1. Nothing else. Really!

    2. When I said this combination enables 1:1 or better copies, I meant the entire 35mm frame can be copied, with or without cropping. If you want to see the slide mount or the film sprockets for some reason, you can do that. If you want to crop the image, you can do that, too.

    3. I never focus by sliding the ES-1 tube. I slide the tube only to adjust magnification. I focus the 40mm macro lens normally, using autofocus through the viewfinder. It has no trouble locking focus in bright light, and the images are wire sharp. The film grain is easily visible. I usually shoot at f/11 or f/16 to ensure sharp focus at the edges and corners of my slides and negatives, which are often old and warped. Contrary to statements by people who apparently have never used this lens, there is virtually no visible loss of sharpness at f/11 or f/16 versus f/5.6 or f/8. The visible difference is that corners and edges are sometimes out of focus at those "ideal" middle apertures.

    4. To speed up slide copying, I wrap a wide rubber band around the ES-1 barrel. Sliding the tube against this rubber band instantly sets the tube for full-frame magnification. Of course, you must find a rubber band of the correct width and circumference for this purpose..
     
  8. No adapters, extension tubes, or additional gizmos of any kind are required to copy mounted slides. The ES-1 screws directly into the lens' 52mm filter thread. All you need is a DX body, the 40mm lens, and the ES-1. Nothing else. Really! - and for AF-S Micro 60mm & any FX body you need only BR-5 - 52-62mm, nothing else, for the old 55 micro you need extension tubes

    I never focus by sliding the ES-1 tube. I slide the tube only to adjust magnification. I focus the 40mm macro lens normally
    - exactly!

    Fiodor - if you want to see the full frame of the 35mm slide - you have to cut a little bit the edges of a single plastic frame - that's what I did, so that I could have the whole slide - from black to black
    the Coolscans also rely on the frame so you have automatically cropped file if you use normal frame, the negatives are full I think, I don't know how it would be the new holders of ES-2

    I use f8 and honestly I don't see any focus problem on the edges
     
  9. I'm pretty sure extensions will be needed for DX cameras, since the lens must be focused further, at 1:1.5 (2:3) reproduction ratio. I have several film strip holders which will show the borders of the frame, but other than the glass holder for my LS-8000, none can show the sprocket holes. I don't yet have the ES-2 device, and can't comment on the holders which come with it. I remain hopeful, however.

    The film usually needs adjusting once clamped in a frame, particularly to put the dividers squarely on the gaps between frames. Get a few pairs of cotton gloves used by photofinishing labs to do this without leaving fingerprints. (Latex gloves work, but are extremely uncomfortable after a while.) Even lint-free gloves leave lint at the pixel level, so clean the film after it's in position.

    @asrukov: Magnification is adjusted with the lens, and lens alone. The sliding adapter is used to focus the slide once the lens is set. I use slightly less than 1:1 ratio with the lens, which leaves me a little room to fine tune the focus using the lens*. Adjusting the adapter has NO EFFECT on magnification (Optics 101). And yes, a 55 mm macro needs an extension tube (27 mm, or PX13) to achieve 1:1 reproduction. I was referring to another the of extension ring, Nikon K tubes, which go between the filter ring and the slide adapter. The latter will be required to use the ES-2 with a DX or 4/3 camera, which require 1:1.5 or 1:2 magnification respectively, which increase the working distance of the lens.

    * I'm using a Sony A7ii or A7Rii which apply a 5x or 12x magnification to the electronic finder for fine focusing. This makes it easy to achieve grain-sharp focusing not possible with a DSLR unless you have live view with digital magnification. (All a loupe will do is magnify pixels of the screen itself. You can use a loupe (e.g., Hoodman) with an LCD screen, but only to shield from extraneous light at 1:1 magnification.)
     
  10. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Administrator Staff Member

    4. To speed up slide copying, I wrap a wide rubber band around the ES-1 barrel. Sliding the tube against this rubber band instantly sets the tube for full-frame magnification. Of course, you must find a rubber band of the correct width and circumference for this purpose..[/QUOTE]

    If you only use one setup / combination, blue painters tape works well also.
     
  11. The dividers are necessary to prevent curling or supping of the negatives. If the negatives were stored rolled up, you may have a lot of trouble scanning them. Mine are stored flat in "archival" pages, and after a while (days, weeks or months) become dead flat. You may not be able of fit these dividers to all the inter-frame spaces, Most cameras have irregular spacing, unless they actually pull the film with the sprockets rather than count pulses. The only cameras I have which do this are Leicas, or any of the single-digit Nikon F cameras.

    You can usually adjust at least one frame to fit the opening exactly. Use gloves and slide the film once the holder is closed. The film is never held too tightly to do this. If the film is curled, the cut ends must be held by the frame or spacers.

    Nikon scanners show the full frames with borders (no sprocket holes). I generally crop in the preview mode, before scanning, because too much border showing affects the exposure and color balance.
     
  12. My apologies to @Astrukov; You were quoting and responding to @Halfill.

    @Halfhill - Please note that DX and 4/3 cameras need special accommodations. 1:1 reproduction means just that, the image is the same size as the subject. This is independent of the lens or format size. At 1:1, a DX camera would only copy the center 2/3rds of the frame.
     
  13. Try KEH, the used camera dealer. They have a repair service. If they do not have the part, they may be able to take it off an unserviceable lens and replace yours.
     
    Greg Fight likes this.
  14. At 1:1, a DX camera would only copy the center 2/3rds of the frame.

    if you use FX lens… the 40mm micro is DX lens… for DX bodies… NO PROBLEM with it…

    f you want to use other brands - like Sony, Olympus and etc, of course you have to take in mind the different ratio of the sensor

    This makes it easy to achieve grain-sharp focusing not possible with a DSLR unless you have live view with digital magnification

    I didn't get that AT ALL… I don't have ANY problem focusing SHARP without live view or other stuff…
     
  15. Someone mentioned virtualization for running a Nikon film scanner. I have Windows XP running on a Parallels virtual machine on my Mac that I run Nikon Scan in. Parallels can pass through USB devices to the virtual machine, and I think it can finally pass through Firewire devices. (Some Nikon scanners are Firewire-only. Be careful in choosing virtualization software if you need to access one of them.)

    I'd say it's probably a lot easier to get a legal copy of OS X to run inside the VM today, so one could use an OS X version that still has Rosetta. Getting a valid Windows XP disk and license key is getting hard. Although there is knowledge of how to get Nikon Scan running in newer Windows versions.

    If I need Digital ICE3, Nikon Scan is the only choice. But I also have SilverFast Ai, and there are many things it does better than Nikon Scan, like scanning Ektar 100 using the film profile. But for cranking through most C-41 films, Nikon Scan is much more productive.

    I do dread the possibility of my CoolScan V needing (unavailable) repair.

    If I have to start scanning film with a DSLR, I suspect my Pentax K-1 and Pentax-FA 50mm f/2.8 Macro would work fine with the ES-2. Lens goes to 1:1 and has 52mm filter thread. Could use the Pixel Shift to de-Bayer.

    Many folks now just use a dedicated computer for old scanners they want to keep working. I have a Windows XP laptop just to use the HP Scanjet 4600, which is fabulous for scanning pages from books.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2017
  16. "Magnification is adjusted with the lens, and lens alone."

    Nope. Magnification is adjusted by sliding the ES-1 tube back and forth. Sliding it closer to the camera enlarges the image. Sliding it further from the camera shrinks the image. It's easy to copy the whole 35mm frame or a smaller part of it.

    "The sliding adapter is used to focus the slide once the lens is set."

    Only if you want to drive yourself crazy trying to focus an image with a sliding tube and very shallow depth of field. It's much easier to adjust magnification by sliding the tube to the desired position, then autofocus the lens through the viewfinder, as usual. Just press the shutter release halfway -- presto! Sharp focus. Why not use AF when it's available?

    "Adjusting the adapter has NO EFFECT on magnification (Optics 101)."

    Oh, yes it does (Experience 101).
     
  17. Autofocus only works if the magnification is less than 1:1. That's probably okay because you can reduce the magnification and crop the image afterwards. Cardboard mounts crop quite a bit too, so if you frame to the borders, magnification will be less than 1:1.

    You can focus quite finely with the sliding tube if you twist it and gently push the adapter with your finger or thumbnail. It's not hard to straighten it without changing the length. The technique is similar to using a slide rule or vernier caliper. In practice, I leave the adapter about a millimeter long, which allows me to tune the focusing with the lens. In practice, it's what you're doing, but knowledge-based.

    For your homework, show mathematically that at 1:1, the subject is as close to the focal plane as it can ever get and be in focus. In other words, there is only one position where 1:1 magnification is possible. Hint: f = f'
     
  18. Tom, Iosif, Ed... thank you for the information and advice.
     
  19. Here are two example slide dupes using a Nikon D7200 body, Nikkor 40mm f/2.8 macro lens, and ES-1 slide copier. (No other accessories or adapters.) On the left is what you see in the viewfinder when the ES-1 tube is adjusted all the way forward (minimum magnification, maximum coverage). On the right is what you get when the ES-1 tube is adjusted all the way backward (maximum magnification, minimum coverage).

    It's hard to see in these web-resolution images, but the picture on the right is slightly cropped. The cropping is actually more extensive than it appears here, because the plastic mount on this slide already crops a few millimeters around the edges. When I use my converted ES-1 to copy unmounted film strips, I can't use maximum magnification without losing important detail in some pictures. (Not this one.) If for some reason you want to include the film sprockets, you can get them and much more, as the left-hand image demonstrates. The large black area is the slide mount.

    (The top of the right-hand image has some black area from the slide mount. Apparently the slide wasn't perfectly centered in the ES-1. Either I didn't notice it while shooting or my 100% viewfinder isn't really 100%.)

    Also not visible in these web-resolution images is the sharpness. I took multiple shots of this slide at f/5.6, f/8, and f/16. At 100% pixel peeping, I see no differences in center sharpness, but the f/16 image is definitely much sharper at the edges. And this slide isn't even as warped as many others I have copied. That's why I always shoot at f/16 instead of the "ideal" middle apertures. This lens is well optimized for small apertures, which is a valuable property for a macro lens, because depth of field at these dimensions is razor thin.
    ES-1_magnification.jpg
     

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