Need Best Polarizer for Canon 24-70 that Won't Vignette and Will Take Lens Cap

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by william_h._wiley, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. I want to buy a very high quality circular polarizer to use with my Canon 24-70 L lens (and other lenses that take a 77mm mount) that will accomplish 2 things:
    1. Not cause vignetting at 24mm (or even wider)
    2. Will accept a lens cap.
    I've considered the Heliopan 77mm Circular Polarizer Multi-coated (SH-PMC) filter, but it appears that all of their high quality filters don't have an external thread and won't accept a lens cap. I do nature and wildlife photography and want to be able to put a lens cap on for protection.
    Are their other options for a high quality multi-coated polarizer that will allow me to accomplish both things?
    Thanks in advance, Bill
     
  2. consider the Nikon CPL II which is very thin w/ threads.
     
  3. "I've considered the Heliopan 77mm Circular Polarizer Multi-coated (SH-PMC) filter, but it appears that all of their high quality filters don't have an external thread and won't accept a lens cap. "
    ======

    You can buy a special lens cap that fits the ultra-thin Heliopan polarizer filter, at least that's what I did. I think I purchased it from B&H.
     
  4. Which camera do you use?
     
  5. I think a regular B+W CP would just be ok with the 24-70, even if you're full frame. Why don't you just go to a regular camera store and try some out?
     
  6. The 'B+W 77mm Kaeseman Circular Polarizing Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) Glass Filter (Slim)' it comes with a slip on lens cap (fits over filter). This is a very high quality filter. There regular slim filter might also come with a cap I'm not sure.
     
  7. William you do not need thin filters for the 24-70. Any quality polariser you want will do fine, even on ff there is no vignetting with regular thickness filters with regular threads on the outside. Do not pay a premium for a thin filter on this lens.
     
  8. I doubt that a regular filter will vignette on the 24-105. At least mine does not. That being said, if you want a thin filter it will probably not have threads. Consider a neoprene sock as a cap. They are great protection. I use one when I use thin filters. There are a couple of brands out there, available in different sizes. Much better than the press on vinyl caps made for these filters. They never seem to stay on very well.
     
  9. Have you considered HOYA HD?
    It is thin and it has threads for lens cap.
     
  10. david_henderson

    david_henderson www.photography001.com

    The Hoya Pro ! is a good polariser, is slim and won't vignette, and will take a Canon lens cap.
    However I have two other suggestions.
    • Buy a slim B+W MRC filter with no front threads and get into the habit of taking the polariser off after you've taken a shot with it. Otherwise you may get into a habit of using the polariser on all your shots rather than selectively. I've been there, it doesn't help.
    • Check out the comment that a regular polariser won't vignette with your lens and if so get the regular B+W MRC coated polariser.
    B+W are a lot easier to clean than the Hoya and the coating will last longer.
     
  11. david_henderson

    david_henderson www.photography001.com

    The Hoya Pro ! is a good polariser, is slim and won't vignette, and will take a Canon lens cap.
    However I have two other suggestions.
    • Buy a slim B+W MRC filter with no front threads and get into the habit of taking the polariser off after you've taken a shot with it. Otherwise you may get into a habit of using the polariser on all your shots rather than selectively. I've been there, it doesn't help.
    • Check out the comment that a regular polariser won't vignette with your lens and if so get the regular B+W MRC coated polariser.
    B+W are a lot easier to clean than the Hoya and the coating will last longer.
     
  12. "Consider a neoprene sock as a cap. They are great protection."​
    Sounds interesting. Are these made specifically for use on lenses, and does anyone have a link to those neoprene socks?
     
  13. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    You can get OpTech hood hats at a reasonable price from the usual mail order places (I buy mine from Adorama), these are essentially neoprene socks. I use them, and with a hood on, you don't bother with a lens cap. I don't bother with a lens cap on a lens with a filter anyway, but the filters I use are to keep blood, sweat and spit off the lens.
     
  14. Neoprene holds grit, we use neoprene covers on our dive camera housing ports, we have to be very careful what side is the lens side and really baby them, also they offer no knock protection. Good idea but not the best solution.
     
  15. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    If you put them over a hood, they're perfectly good protection.
     
  16. I agree, over a hood they are a good idea, against the glass, front element or filter they aren't. But it is the hood that offers the knock protection in that case.
     
  17. Jeff & Scott, thanks for your input.
    I can see the drawbacks, but they certainly seem to have their uses, especially when strapped onto a hood. I find the hard lens caps often too fiddly under these circumstances.
     
  18. I'll add my vote for the Hoya Pro HD. I picked one up a few months ago and have been very impressed. I haven't seen a circ polarizer that is slimmer. Even the ones with no threads that I have looked at are not as slim. Takes a Canon lens cap with no problem and I can thread my slot filter holder onto it with no problem.
     
  19. Another vote for the Hoya HD. It is thin, works well even with WA lenses, blocks less light than B+W Kaesemann.
     
  20. David Henderson wrote:
    B+W are a lot easier to clean than the Hoya and the coating will last longer.​
    I can understand that one coating can be tougher-wearing than another, but how come the B+W are easier to clean than Hoya?
     
  21. I second that the Hoya MRC coated filter is harder to clean. My brother bought a Hoya MRC filter, and I purchased a B+W MRC filter. I've cleaned them both, and the B+W is much easier to clean. Don't know why, but it's true. - My 2 cents.
     
  22. david_henderson

    david_henderson www.photography001.com

    Can't answer "how come" but affirm that the cleaning difference exists across the 3 Hoya and 3 B+W MRC polarisers I have for various systems. There's been a lot of stuff on here about this, and I'm sure some of it will be accessible by a search.
     
  23. I like the lee filter system the circular pol filter costs but it fantastic quality. You can use the holder with place for a single Grad and will not have problems of vignette. You need to remove the holder to fit a lens cap. But you can just remove the holder inbetween shots. Will save you money long term if you plan on using Grads or ND grads. The pol filter works best when its up front.
     
  24. I avoid the thin filters if possible because of the inability to use the lens cap (sometimes you need to leave the filter on for a day or so, so it is inconvenient to keep taking it off after each shot). I find the press on caps that come with the filters don't stay on and often end up lost. The hood hats are a good idea. Funny, I own three or four that I use to cushion lenses when I use a non-padded bag but, somehow, forgot to try them for their intended use!
     
  25. The Hoya HD has different coating than Pro 1. I have one Pro 1 filter and it is a nightmare to clean. Hoya HD is substantially easier to clean than the Pro 1 and I would say perhaps even easier than B+W Kaeseman.
    I have two Hoya HD polarizers and two B+W Kaesemann polarizers and my next polarizer will be Hoya HD again.
     
  26. This is the kind of feedback I need. Sounds like the general concensus is that vignetting is NOT an issue any of the filters mentioned and that most people like the Hoya Pro HD or the B+W MRC. Sounds like the Hoya will accept a filter; nothing was said about the B+W taking a filter but that options exist like the neoprene sock, etc. Great info that will help me make a smart choice. As all of you know, I'll probably have this filter for years to come, so I want to get the best one to meet my needs.
    I shoot a Canon 5DMK II and occasionally a 1DMK II. This would mainly be used on the 5DMK II though.
    Thanks everyone. Photo.net comes through again -- Bill
     

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