Monday in Nature, 15 June 2020

Discussion in 'Nature' started by DavidTriplett, Jun 15, 2020.

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  1. Basic Guidelines: In the strictest sense, nature photography should not include "hand of man elements". Please refrain from images with buildings or human made structures like roads, fences, walls. Pets are not permitted. Captive subjects in zoos, arboretums, or aquariums are permitted, but must be declared, and must focus on the subject, not the captivity. Images with obvious human made elements will likely be deleted from the thread, with an explanation to the photographer. Guidelines are based on PSA rules governing Nature photography which also cover the Nature Forum. Keep your image at/under 1000 pixels on the long axis for in-line viewing. Note that this includes photos hosted off-site at Flicker, Photobucket, your own site, etc.

    Each member please post no more than just one image to this weekly thread per week.

    American Coot, Bear River MBR. These are ubiquitous in early spring, so much so one would think they would remain so through the summer. However, by this time of year they have become much less observable. Not sure why...
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    Last edited: Jun 15, 2020
  2. I was chased out of my backyard by a swarm of indignant yellow-jackets this morning, which brought to mind this image from several years ago: a new leaf which I had absolutely no intention of turning over.
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  3. Taken in Jack E. Hill Park, Elk Grove, CA 21 May 2020 @ 1:44 PM
    Nikon D750 1/1600 sec, f/8, ISO 450 (Auto) Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD A009N @ 200mm Range: 5.31 meters

    Please view full-size

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  4. Neon Skimmer in Austin, Texas DSC_5157.jpg
     
  5. Cruising the beach, Point Lobos, California. Nikon D200, 70-200 f2.8 VR Nikkor, ISO 320 Monterey 20060016AA0_0015.jpg
     
  6. Sea Lions
    Monterey 20d_Coast Guard Pier_Sea Lions_2.jpg
     
  7. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Administrator Staff Member

  8. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Hungry great egret chicks

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  9. Great shot; marvelous detail in the wings.

    What equipment did you use and what exposure, please?
     
  10. Eastern Box Turtle. My dog found a it at a dry rocky area of a trail. It was covered with dust and mud and I thought it was probably dead; but it felt heavy though. So I took it home, put it under a faucet, and it came "alive". After washing and brushing, it became a pretty Eastern Box Turtle. I believe it is at least some 30 years old because the rings on the shell are indeciperably dense. It drank quite a bit of water but did not eat anything solid that I provided. So, on the next morning, I took some photos of it walking on a natural area; then placed it back to where it was found but under some shade (glad it rained overnight). We went back there the next day and could not find it anymore. Have a good rest-of-life, Turtle! :) (By the way, this is the first time I seriously tried the Sigma 150mm maco lens with optical stablizer on the Nikon Z6.)
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    Last edited: Jun 15, 2020
  11. first time using my 100-300 mm 5.6 fdn canon zoom on my f1. new old camera pics 023.jpg
     
  12. 006NAT Cisne-Almazán N35-70.jpg Nikon FE. Nikkor AI 35-70. Kodak Gold 200
     
  13. Vincent Peri

    Vincent Peri Metairie, LA

    Hmm... God bless turtles...
    [​IMG]
     
    cameragary and Mary Doo like this.
  14. Nikon D850...600mm, f/8, ISO 2200, 1/640 sec
     
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  15. We have two loon chicks on our local lake for the first time in living memory.

    We have had nests four of the past five years, but the first three failed... two due to predation, one cause unknown.

    Mortality in chicks is high, but we'll keep our fingers crossed.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. It has lived for so long and I do pray that it will live out the rest of its life. I looked at the environment it came from and knew that I would not be able to survive given the situation. But it may be able to find insects, worms, mushrooms, and wild berries. Come to think of it, it might have eaten some of the blueberries I gave it.
     
  17. Thank you, Bill.
    Was that your Tamron 150-600 set at 600 or a different lens?

    With the orange color, the insect certainly lives up to the "Neon" part of its name.
     
  18. Looking at this image, I can almost hear the opening bars of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake.
     
    luis triguez likes this.
  19. It was my Tamron lens...
     
    bgelfand likes this.
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