help find a pocket nice camera for street photography

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by ivan_vilches, May 4, 2015.

  1. Hello guys first of all i am not sure if this is the place for post this question, if not sorry about that,
    i am researching about to find a pocket camera for street photography and Manual controls on 35mm film, i want something up to 100 dollars, i saw this list on ebay are cheap, not sure which of all that are manual and with good optic?, thanks for share your wisdom and sorry for my bad english.
    Voigtlander Vitomatic
    canonet ql17
    minox 35 gt
    yashica electro
    rollei 35
    olympus 35 rc
    konica s3
    konica s2
    zeiss ikon contaflex
    zeiss ikon contessa
    zeiss contina
    werra zeiss jena
     
  2. Minox GT is aperture priority / program mode.
    I'd prefer the Voigtländer Vito II for pocketability (tiny folder with squinty finder. Comes either in metric or Imperial (? - ft...) engraving) if it has to be a Voigtländer
    Kodak Retina II is also a pocketable folder and even a rangefinder.
    Contaflex might be a bit dim and heavy? - I'd go for a fantastic plastic SLR like Ricoh KR5 instead.
     
  3. Konica S3, or several other identical cameras with their own brands. Minolta particularly comes to mind, as they made the came camera with more manual adjustments. The Konica lens is every bit as good as my Leica Summicron-C 40mm. (I still have three brand-new ones put away, never expecting that the digital revolution would render them obsolete.)
     
  4. Konica S3, or several other identical cameras with their own brands. Minolta particularly comes to mind, as they made the came camera with more manual adjustments. The Konica lens is every bit as good as my Leica Summicron-C 40mm. (I still have three brand-new ones put away, never expecting that the digital revolution would render them obsolete.)
     
  5. konica s3 is manual too?
     
  6. I haven't tried the Konicas, which look pretty good. The smallest compact camera I've owned with fully functional manual overrides, rangefinder focusing, etc., is the Olympus 35 RC. I've had two. Good lens, good design, well made if not quite as solid feeling as the Canonet. The meter and auto exposure are reasonably useful but it's fully functional without batteries if you're comfortable with a handheld meter or guesstimating exposure.
    If it was any smaller it would be difficult to operate. The top mounted shutter speed dial helps relieving some crowding around the lens barrel, although it's still a challenge to adjust the aperture without also turning the focus ring - but not vice versa. Click stops on the aperture ring minimize the risk of accidental shifting while refocusing.
    The Canonet GIII QL17 is a great compact rangefinder, but I wished the shutter speed dial were on top. Even though the camera and lens barrel are larger it's still cramped trying to adjust only the shutter speed or only the aperture ring without accidentally shifting the other.
    Keep in mind that it's becoming more challenging to find fully functional compact rangefinders for less than $100. These cameras are decades old and prone to gummy old lubes jamming the leaf shutters. A CLA will usually cost more than $100, and doing it yourself can be difficult without certain tools. For example, the Canonet must be disassembled from the rear of the lens, through the body, to repair a gummed up shutter.
     
  7. Look for a Ricoh 500G like mine HERE. Crisp lens, rangefinder, super compact. Be sure rear seals are good. They tend to get gummy but Jon Goodman still has seal kits for these.
    The Beauty Super II is less common but a wonderful, compact shooter HERE. One in great condition might tax your budget, however.
    The Aires 35-III has, IMHO, the best lens of any fixed lens RF camera ever made HERE
    The Konica Auto S2 is a bigger camera but also has a top notch lens and can often be found for reasonable prices HERE
    There are many camera that would fit your needs. But, as Lex mentioned, condition is king.
     
  8. "are manual and with good optic" Ivan V.
    I'm with Louis M. on the Aires choice, but for compact automation that also goes full "manual", I love the Olympus 35RC as a choice.
    What's not to like about it?
    1. Super compact
    2. Durable/hearty construction
    3. RF focusing
    4. Conventional control positions & loading of film
    5. High sharpness with a perfect focal length lens
    6. If you go automatic, exposures are very accurate
    7. Guide number exposure flash system, etc.
    8. Review <<< click If you're patient, they can still be had for less than $100.
    00dH6E-556627284.JPG
     
  9. There are a number of good models in that list and outside of it but the most important consideration is CONDITION. Secondly, many older models need battery upgrades so you will need to look into that. Also, shades are enormously difficult to find.
     
  10. Thanks guys for your kind help, i have a few more question i like the oly 35 rc , konica s2 and aires 35 iii, you guys know what batteries use this cameras?
    thanks again .
     
  11. The Olympus and Konica use 625 mercury batteries. The Aries is all mechanical and only a few models appera to have been offered with a selenium meter that doesn't need a battery and is most likely dead as a hammer.
    I've used hearing aid batteries as a replacement for mercury batteries with no issue. There are other options available for sell. Also, just so you know, the S2 is going to be considerably larger than the Olympus.
     
  12. I would highly recommend the Canonet GIII QL17. A borrowed one was the first 35mm camera I ever used many, many years ago as a teenager and used it to shoot the first newspaper pictures I ever had published. Years later I bought one at a camera meet and for many years it was my walking around/vacation/family pictures camera when I didn't want to haul the full Nikon SLR outfit around. I've shot everything from family snapshots to Page One newspaper pictures with this camera and love it. Solidly built, very sharp lens, full manual control, even has both a hot shoe and PC terminal (not found on some current DSLRs). Bright, easy to use rangefinder/viewfinder. I think I actually like the viewfinder better than the one on my M3. Great camera.
     
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    Rollei 35S black
     
  14. With all due respect to Martin T., the Swiss made "CIA Watergate" Tessina, is a royal pain to use in practical terms
    (i.e. reloading your own film mini cassettes & relatively poor IQ etc.).
    The Minox, almost as "tiny" when folded, but the IQ is fantastic !
    00dHIh-556658984.JPG
     
  15. There is too much personality in this question for someone else to really answer it for you. I tried using the Minox 35GT as
    a carry around camera for landscapes. The lens is very good but the scale focusing makes getting really good focus
    problematic. Also, it's made pretty well but it won't stand up to a lot of use.

    I also tried the Contax T2 which is probably out of your price range. Great pictures, but not enough creative control and
    like the Minox, you were stuck with one focal length.

    I ultimately decided on (before I went digital) a Leica CL. Not all that collectable, not expensive as Leicas go but way
    more than $100 with the baseline 40mm lens. But it's a great carry around camera. Perfect creative control, good meter,
    excellent rangefinder, and well made.

    If you're looking for quirky fun, the Minox or the Rollei or most of the others will do fine and there IS something magic
    about taking pictures with a cheap camera.
     
  16. ivan vilches , May 04, 2015; 09:42 p.m. ...i am researching about to find a pocket camera for street photography and Manual controls on 35mm film, i want something up to 100 dollars, i saw this list on ebay are cheap, not sure which of all that are manual and with good optic?...​
    Hello Ivan, have you considered the Argus C3 (also known as the "Brick")? Although not exactly pocketable and a bit weighty, I picked one up for $15 at a local antiques co-op and am thrilled at its performance. The 50mm Cintar lens is actually quite good. Good luck with your choice. Some samples...
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  17. Dont worry about batteries! Get an Olympus Pen EE2 - I love it to load a standard roll and get 72 shots - use B/w Kodak Tmax and resolution is just fine!
     
  18. SCL

    SCL

    All the above are good choices, several of which I've owned over the years (I've handled but never used the Tessina), depending on condition, availability and price. My vote leans toward the Minox if you're good at zone focusing, but let me make a plug for the Yashica Electro. It is bigger and heavier than many of the others, and many had electrical issues, but: it has a terrific viewfinder, focuses fast, has a large aperture lens (great for low light), and is razor sharp. You'll need a roomy pocket however.
     
  19. I can only comment on cameras that I have used. If you want manual control the Canonet QL17 or the Rollei 35 are good choices. If you want auto the Canonet 28 or the Yashica Electro GS or GSN are good.
     
  20. I've had excellent luck with a Rollei 35S. Accurate meter, sharp lens and bright viewfinder for 40mm lens. No rangefinder but estimating distance isn't that hard. I don't worry about the meter as I use my phone light meter app. I tend to use it as a backup camera. Good flash sync too.
     

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