General Purpose Lens

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by friskybongo, May 16, 2016.

  1. Hi All,
    Need your advice. I just received my Canon 80D(!) and want to purchase a general purpose walk around prime lens. Something small, lightweight, that I can use for family shots (including my 5 dogs) in the house plus outdoor pictures of general images – not landscapes. I guess something that approximates a normal 50mm lens on a crop body.
    I’m considering the 24mm STM, 40mm STM and 50mm f/1.8 STM but don’t want to duplicate ranges I already have with my current lenses: 10-22mm, 100mm macro, 70-200 f/4 and 400mm f/5.6. The 24mm might be too close to the tail end of the 10-22 and the 50mm might be too narrow plus I’ve read some bad things about the build quality although it does allow about 1.3 more stops over the 24mm and 40mm.
    I’m thinking the 40mm is the way to go but would welcome your expertise and experience.
    Thank you.
     
  2. The 40 is a great little lens that weighs nothing. It's good optically.
     
  3. As James mentions, the 40mm STM is a very good lens, but on a crop sensor body the 24mm STM might make more sense as a walk around lens.
    You might want to rent either the 24mm or the 40mm (or both for that matter) and try them out. I think your assessment of the 50mm f/1.8 is correct. Not as nice a lens and, for your purposes, a bit too long in my opinion.
    I went a slightly different route and got the EF 28mm f/2.8 IS. More expensive and slightly larger but better in every category if the focal length works for you.
    JD
     
  4. I owned the 40mm f/2.8 pancake as well as the original 35mm f/2 and the older 50mm f/1.8 II.
    I sold the 40mm as I liked the slightly wider, slightly faster 35mm more, despite the (relative) larger size compared to the 40. My next favorite lens on a crop sensor camera is indeed the 24mm f/2.8.
    I'd recommend the 35mm f/2 IS or the 24mm f/2.8 IS. Look for either used (from reputable sources) or refurbished from Canon for some cost savings.
     
  5. Don't forget the 2 x 28s: 28mm f1.8 and f2.8 IS. 1st is not very good on full frame but will probably be good on APS-C. The 28mm f2.8 IS is even better optically than the 24mm IS. 40mm pancake (64mm FOV on 80D) strikes me as a bit long for an everyday lens.
     
  6. Thanks everyone for your input. I've just ordered the 24mm STM.
    FYI: One thing I just noticed is that the 24mm STM is an EF-S lens while the 40mm STM is EF so will fit either crop or full frame bodies. Doesn't matter to me since I don't plan on upgrading to full frame. Just thought you should know.
     
  7. Personally I would find the 24 a little bit wide, even on the APS-C, but chacun à son goût.
    My own favorite APS-C prime is the 35mm f/2 lens(es).
    However, for a very considerable amount of flexibility in a single, all-purpose, "walk-around" lens, it's almost impossible to do better than the EF-S 15-85mm IS. It has many virtues and its few vices are easily fixed for the rare occasions where they do matter.
    Don't let questions of ritual purity impede your shooting....
     
  8. [[Personally I would find the 24 a little bit wide, even on the APS-C]]

    One of my favorite film cameras was the Canonet QL17 GIII which I think explains my preference for the 24mm on APS-C (over the 28mm)
     
  9. Might also want to consider the Youngnuo 35mm f2 lens. For under a hundred bucks, it's decent enough. Keep in mind that it's not a *great* lens and you'll enjoy it. I keep one mounted on my 20D or 30D and haven't yet had it let me down.
     
  10. i have the 24stm its a good lens and on my 100D/SL1 it will fit in a jacket pocket which it was fitted permanently
    until i get the 35mmF2is....if you are thinking of indoor shots you will find the extra light gathering of the F2 not to mention the IS on still subjects useful...35mm is about a standard lens on full frame
     
  11. I have the 24 stm as well. I use it when I just want to take snapshots and don't want to lug around on a lot of lenses. The camera becomes really slim and fits in a handbag or a big pocket.
     

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