Transfering pictures from my Canon EOS Rebel 300d to my computer

Discussion in 'Beginner Questions' started by staci_albright, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. How do I do this, What do I need? All I have in my posession is the camera body, batteries, and memory cards but I dont have anything else. I am in the process of buying a 18-55mm IS lens so I am mainly wondering what other things do i need? I'm going to start with only one lens for now. other than lenses and a camera bag, what else do i need? I know i need the software but I dont know what type (if there is a certain type specially for my camera). If you could give me tips on what cites I could find these things (possibly as cheap as possible, but good quality) that would be great.
     
  2. My recommendation is:
    1. Install Google's free Picasa tool for now. Let it download the photos from the memory card reader for you. It should organize your photos into a date-based folder structure.
    2. Get a Compact Flash card reader. Take the cards out of the camera and put them in there when you're ready to download.
     
  3. I solved this problem last week when my wife's card was full and my big cards wouldn't work in her rather early camera which she loves .... my 'second camera' which I lent her was "too heavy". Lighter than yours :)
    I bought a card reader which accepts SDHC cards and then fits into the USB socket of her laptop.
    There are also other readers about 2" square which handle CF cards and other kinds which you may need for your camera's cards. The little Kodak SD reader cost about US$17 from Radio Shack, about the same was the cost of the SD/CF reader back in NZ. Both work well and come up in Windows as an external source [ don't know how Apple works :) ] for files to be accessed and transferred into your computer.
     
  4. There is no need to get any programme because Windows Explorer will do it all for you. Been doing so for me for the past decade or so.
     
  5. [[There is no need to get any programme because Windows Explorer will do it all for you. Been doing so for me for the past decade or so.]]
    There is a need to get a program, because it's starts you thinking about organization. I can't count how many times people have come to me (or that I've seen here on photo.net) with a complete mess of photo organization. The time spent trying to sort it all out is a complete loss.
    A program such as Picasa (and there are others, of course) will centralize the images, index them, and provide a coherent directory structure that can be used by other image management program. It has the added bonus of also being an entry level non-destructive editor.
     
  6. Regardless of what program you use (and Canon's own that came with the camera works pretty well for the first step of getting the image over), the main thing is that it is usually a lot more convenient, frequently faster, and generally less hassle to use a card reader. However, you should have got a USB cable to connect the camera directly, if you choose to go that route. The manual has details. If you don't have the manual, download one from the Canon USA (e.g., link) or other national site. The other software is usually available in the same general area for your model.

    The card readers are available incredibly cheaply, post paid, from China on eBay - usually called something like a USB All-in-One card reader. It can take from a week to several weeks for the China to US (if that's where you are) mails to operate.
     
  7. With Picasa, will my personal photos be uploaded for anyone to see or do I have an option? to post pics or not?
     
  8. [[(and Canon's own that came with the camera works pretty well for the first step of getting the image over]]
    The OP purchased the camera used. I assumed the list of included items was complete and that the disks were not part of the purchase. Given the effort it takes to get the software installed if you don't have the original disks and are less than familiar with such things as registry entries, I chose to leave that discussion for another time.
     
  9. [[With Picasa, will my personal photos be uploaded for anyone to see or do I have an option? to post pics or not?]]
    Picasa will not upload any photos anywhere until you specifically select photos and push the Share button.
     
  10. okay. And you havnt had any problems with installing it from the internet? Im very paranoid about installing or downloading anything from the internet
     
  11. The card I have for my Canon EOS Rebel 300d is a Sandisk ultra compactflash 30mb/s* 4GB. What card reader or cord will I need to transfer to my computer?
     
  12. [[And you havnt had any problems with installing it from the internet? Im very paranoid about installing or downloading anything from the internet]]
    When you consider risk, you should include in that consideration, the source. I can't help you "trust" that Google produces a decent, safe, software product. That's something you're going to have to do research on. All I can tell you is that I use it, my employer uses it, many in my family use it, friends use it, etc. It's not the perfect solution, but it is a good entry-level one and it's free. If you don't like it, uninstall it.
     
  13. on the left side of my camera i have a spot for a video out cord, a digital, and something else. the digital one looks like it is a usb connection. If that is correct, couldnt I get pictures from my camera to my laptop that way as well as a card reader?
     
  14. Staci,
    If you choose to buy a reader, as I stated in my original reply: you would need a reader that takes Compact Flash (CF) cards. You could purchase a reader that can take other card types as well, but it must at least be able to take Compact Flash cards.
    For example, this link should take you to B&H and show you card readers that take CF sorted by most reviews.
    http://lnk.nu/bhphotovideo.com/25th
    These are readers that connect to your computer via USB port.
     
  15. [[If that is correct, couldnt I get pictures from my camera to my laptop that way as well as a card reader?]]
    Yes, you can, and many people do. I personally find it easier to download with a card reader because:
    1) there's less risk of the cord being snagged by someone/something and pulling the camera down to the floor
    2) I can charge the battery in the charger while downloading with a reader. With a cord, the camera has to be on and the battery in.
    3) I find my reader to be faster at downloading.
    4) A few times I have needed to download a card while continuing to shoot. A card reader allows that. A cord means your camera is tied up.
     
  16. on the left side of my camera i have a spot for a video out cord, a digital, and something else. the digital one looks like it is a usb connection. If that is correct, couldn't I get pictures from my camera to my laptop that way as well as a card reader?​
    Yes you could, but you need the appropriate cable and software. With a card reader you just take the card out of the camera, put it in the reader, and it shows up on your computer like a memory stick or another drive. Card readers are available from $2.99. $3.99 buy you a fancy red one. In my opinion it's the easiest way to go.
    Personally I don't use any software, for organizing, but after what Rob said, I might have to give Picasa a try. My image collection is a mess! For editing, I use GIMP. It's the next best thing to Photoshop, and since it's free it seems like a no-brainer for those who can't afford Photoshop.
     
  17. Will that product accept CF cards? Yes. Will it actually work? Based on some of the reviews it looks iffy.
     
  18. The one you found on Amazon is $4.00 including shipping, and it works only with CF cards. The ones I pointed to on eBay are cheaper - even the fancy red one! - and they work with CF cards as well as other cards, which might be useful if you ever upgrade your camera.
     
  19. Okay thanks a lot I do like the red one lol
     
  20. You don't want to rely on the camera's USB connection to upload your photos. The 300D supported only USB 1.0, which is painfully slow. Just get an inexpensive card reader and use that.
    <Chas>
     
  21. 'The Red One' is both inexpensive and supports USB 2.0, which means it fits Charles' requirements. Unless your computer shopping budget is in an entirely different league as your camera spending money, there is no way you have a computer that supports the recently introduced - and still very pricey - USB 3.0.
    USB 2.0 should be all you need in a card reader.
     

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