Too many cameras

Discussion in 'Casual Photo Conversations' started by joe_hodge, Aug 25, 2017.

  1. Given the truth of much of PapaTango's comments above, I still wonder

     
    AJG and Sandy Vongries like this.
  2. In vino veritas?! ;)
     
    PapaTango likes this.
  3. PapaTango

    PapaTango Itinerant Philosopher

    No, in IPA shitfaced... :confused:
     
  4. Yeah, well....at some point in age, one attains a certain expertise in transforming alcoholic beverages into urine.:cool:.
     
  5. PapaTango

    PapaTango Itinerant Philosopher

    Yeah well, I have mastered that subject over 40 year ago... :cool:

    The trick is not to wet your pants. o_O
     
    Sandy Vongries likes this.
  6. What is this concept of "too many cameras" mentioned in the thread title? :)

    I've floated the idea before that maybe I have too many systems, but then I never go far with thinking either. Heck, I could almost say that when it comes to Nikons I really have four systems(pre-AI, AI, AF, and Digital) although there is significant overlap between those systems-especially with Pre-AI and AI, then AF and Digital. Then there's the Canon FD/FL/R system, the Bronica focal plane system(I don't know of a cohesive term for it, although mine is built around S2a bodies), the Bronica SQ system, Bronica ETR system, and Mamiya RB67. Oh, there's also large format, a small collection of LTM stuff, scattered Rolleiflexes, and other stuff I'm forgetting about. I even flirted with Canon EOS for digital, but sold out of all but one body and lens.
     
  7. Since this thread inspired me to get rid of a bunch of camera equipment I didn't really need, I decided to give an update on my progress.

    My goal was to have one DSLR, one medium format camera, and one SLR. I chose to move to Olympus's OM platform for the SLR since they are fairly compact and I thought that would also allow me to do without my rangefinder. The OM lenses also adapt well to Canon DSLRs while Canon's own FD lenses do not.

    So far I've managed to divest myself of 2 cameras and 3 lenses. So now I'm down to 8 cameras after having 6 about a month ago... Yes, you read that right. I did sell two cameras but I've somehow managed to purchase 4 more. o_O

    This pruning thing is harder than I thought. To be fair, in 2 of those cases, I wasn't interested in the camera, it was just part of the lot. One of others was just too good a deal to pass up, and the last was the OM-2S that I've decided is going to be my SLR of choice. Or at least I'm going to audition it to be my SLR of choice.

    Besides learning that I suck at downsizing, I've picked up a few more tidbits of wisdom. One is that every major camera brand's fans think that their lenses are the best. Whether it's Nikon, Canon, Minolta, or whoever. They same is true of Olympus. The Oly fans think that Olympus lenses are top notch, - and some are indeed very good. What I've found though is that many Olympus lenses are pretty average, and that even in the same line there's quite a variation in quality. The 50mm 1.8 or 1.4 for example. In the Canon FD world, there's some variance too, but pretty much any 50mm 1.4 is a nice sharp lens. With the Olympus lenses you need to pay attention to things like serial numbers and whether the lens says "Made in Japan" or just "Japan" to know whether or not you're getting a good one. One reason I think is that Olympus really tried to keep their lenses as compact as possible and trade-offs were made.

    So while finding the right lenses has been a little complicated for me, the lineup of Olympus manual focus film cameras is pretty straightforward. I have two at the moment but will likely only keep one. I've now got a pretty decent set of Olympus lenses so there's no more reason for me to buy a camera just to get the lenses that come with it. So next month I'm confident that the camera count will actually go down. ;)

    To demonstrate that I've actually made emotional progress in this quest, last night I decided not to go to a police auction to bid on a Hasselblad. Of course I ended up running too late to get there, but it's a step in the right direction.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
  8. After reading Papa Tango's posting, I can identify fully, except that I am no longer 60, but in my early seventies. My mother used to tell me that a person should spend the first two thirds of their life acquiring things and the last third getting rid of them. Of course she did not follow her own advise, and left my sister and I the house that we grew up in full of her "precious" belongings to deal with. According to her rule, I am well behind schedule.

    It is always so much more easier and fun to buy a new piece of equipment than to try to sell it. But, if I do sell, or give away, or donate, something that I have grown attached to, I almost never miss it after it is gone. As an extreme example, in about 1969 or 1970, I purchased a 1952 Mercedes for about $500 and got it running. I intended to restore it, but never had the time. Then for years, I thought that restoring it would be a retirement project. When I finally (semi-) retired in 2008, I realized that I never wanted to do the work or spend the money, so I sold it. It was a big relief when it was finally gone, and although I have fond memories of driving the car, I would never want it back.

    Now, concerning darkroom equipment, I have a nice medium format Omega B8 enlarger with a SuperChromega head, Rodenstock and Schneider lenses, timer, black and white multi-contrast filters, several hundred dollars worth of black and white enlarging paper, and just about everything else needed to equip a darkroom, that I will give away free to anyone reading this. The only catch is that you must pick it up at my house in Idaho Falls, Idaho.
     
  9. Blah blah blah.

    Why would it matter a monkeys left testicular how many cams you have? Isn't it about what you do with them what matters?

    Okay, real bad boy photographers only have one camera and lens.... sort of a thinking " they are up their own arse special photographers".

    Hey,arse dreams.

    Just a thought.
     
  10. Allen, great to see you back -- are you out for the week end? :D
     
  11. Sandy, Im sort of a busy folk turning a few gold coins. Pretty boring really.

    But enjoy popping in.

    Expensive running that Jag.
     
  12. post.jpg Hey, being a executive is not easily...it keeps you on your feet.
     
  13. As they say, I served my time, now retired, just work for myself. We do enjoy having you - me and the mouse in my pocket - a response to the imperial "We".
    Best, S
     
  14. Enjoy your retirement, Sandy...you have worked for it.. . I take photos for the fun of it.

    I work to enjoy the fun of it.

    Neither do I have to do..
     
    Sandy Vongries likes this.
  15. Folks love talking about gear.

    Nothing wrong with that they are enjoying themselves. However, I maybe wrong,, but talking about photos might be even more enjoyable.

    A link which might be as enjoyable as talking about gear. Maybe..

    http://www.citysnaps.net/showkase/
     
  16. post.jpg Buddhism and Photography.
     
  17. The old timers had it right. If you need to carry two cameras, they should be identical to avoid any momentary confusion. Maybe one black and one chrome but otherwise the same. I have to relearn minor things even when switching between two Fuji cameras that are operationally 90% the same. Still, if I had the bucks, I can think of of half dozen new cameras I'd like to own.
     
  18. "The old timers had it right"

    Most folk on PN are old timers who tend to nod off when you are talking to them. Or, they are totally lost in the cobwebs of time....occasionally there is the slight movement of a walking stick thrust forward.

    I love them all. Just the same as I love my old Grandad.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
  19. Dam' Old folks - I guess so, but you might be surprised at what we can do -- and your time is coming, bucko! :eek:
     

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