Scan fullframe?

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by sarah_michelle_larsen, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. Hi.
    I would love to scan my negatives full frmae so that I get the frame around it.
    How is that possible?
    Do ou know any scanner that can do it?
    Right now I dont have a scanner, but will buy one soon.
    Thank you.
     
  2. Sarah, if you use a flatbed scanner, like the Epsons, you can put a 35mm film into a medium format holder.
     
  3. Are you trying to say you want the 35mm sprocket holes in the scan? Why? Scanners seem to be in short supply these days. The prevailing wisdom always was to use a dedicated 35mm scanner like the Nikon Coolscan V ED, but now that that is no longer sold, I think people are turning to the Epson Perfection series of flatbeds. They get good reviews but it's hard to believe they do as good a job. I guess there is just not a market anymore.
     
  4. Get a flat bed scanner and put it on the glass. [​IMG]
     
  5. Oh, and that 35mm film was shot in a medium format camera - thus the image out all the way to the edge.
     
  6. Sheldon, that's a nice scan. Care to elaborate? Which scanner, how do you hold the negative flat, and how do you compensate for the sprocket holes affecting exposure & WB?
    I've used a an Epson v500 with a piece of 4x5 AN glass to hold the negative flat. I find I need to adjust the gamma/contrast after the scan to account for the sprocket holes. This is an example from a Kodak Brownie Starmite II 127 camera:
    00VyWA-228299584.jpg
     
  7. Thank you for all the tips.
    It's not just the sprocket holes. It's the entire black frame around the image I think looks great. But the flatbed thing with the mediumformat holder is a good idea. I will try it out.
    Thanks again.
     
  8. To the best of my knowledge ther is no film scanner dedicated to 35mm film that will alow a full frame scan which includes unexposed negative on all four sides of the negative. It is the unexposed negative that give rise to the black border. I print 35mm film full frame with black borders to indicate that i print all-in full frame. This is one of the reasons I don't scan my 35mm negatives.
     
  9. "Sheldon, that's a nice scan. Care to elaborate? Which scanner, how do you hold the negative flat, and how do you compensate for the sprocket holes affecting exposure & WB?"
    Thanks. It's an Epson 4180 scanner. I've been happy w/it, and have used it to scan up to 6x12 negs/chromes. As to the 35mm negs, I just lay them emulsion side down. I guess that I've been lucky in that I've not had to deal w/any that were too curled. As far as exposure comp & WB, for 99% of the things that I've scanned w/this scanner, I went w/the auto settings, and then tweaked the levels a little bit (in the scanner UI/software) then did the final sizing and sharpening in Photoshop. Some more here - http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=725736
     
  10. Well in the darkroom we used to file out the inside negative carrier edges to expose the negative edges. I bet you could do the same with a plastic film holder for any scanner.
     
  11. David W. Griffin [​IMG][​IMG], Mar 11, 2010; 08:45 a.m.
    ................. They get good reviews but it's hard to believe they do as good a job. I guess there is just not a market anymore.​
    I am here to tell you David that the Epson flatbed scanners fall on their sword compared to the dedicated scanners. I used an Epson V700 for a good while and was generally pleased with the results. Then on day I scanned a negative on a Nikon Super Coolscan LS-8000 ED and my jaw hit the floor. I went back and scanned the same negative on the Epson, using all the same parameters. I posted the comparison between the two, using a crop out of a 100% projection here on PN. The original thread is at http://www.photo.net/casual-conversations-forum/00Vdgs but unfortunately I must have deleted the original image on Photobucket (bigger than PN would allow) and I cannot find it on my desktop.
    I sold the Epson the next day and got a used LS-8000 on Fleabay and have never looked back.
     
  12. Thanks for that observation, Scott, it pretty much confirms my impressions from having viewed dozens of high resolution scans of 35mm from various Epson Vxxx models. The scans were certainly competent and better than previous generations of flatbed hybrids, but didn't seem to compare with dedicated film scanners. Especially with b&w, there was usually some odd chunky patterns in continuous tone areas such as skies where there should have been fine gradation. Hard to describe, but it looked like the scanner or software couldn't quite make sense of the fine patterns of grain and created something resembling the difference between a JPEG and raw version of a blue sky.
     

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