Photography in Nagoya (Japan)

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by pensacolaphoto, Mar 30, 2005.

  1. I will be spending 6 weeks in Nagoya this summer. My family will
    also be with me there. I posted a while ago about the possibility of
    teaching US students in Japan a course on quality control and a
    course on Japanese culture and Photography. This is where I would
    benefit from your input. I will be teaching 5 students a basic
    course on using photography to capture images that illustrate
    aspects of the Japanese culture. I have the following questions:
    1. What type of equipment should I require of my students? Does it
    matter if all students [and myself] use film based or digital
    cameras? What about rangefinder vs. SLR? It may be difficult to
    require students to buy rangefinder cameras at this stage.
    <br> <br>
    2. If a film based camera is used, should I require B&W film, color
    or both? I am thinking of having a weekly critique session of their
    work.
    <br> <br>
    3. Is a textbook necessary for such a course? I could easily teach
    them the basics of photography and have then write photo essays
    (journalistic style) on what they see.
    <br><br>
    4. Is a 50mm lens sufficient? Is a tripod needed? Is there any
    particular equipment that you would suggest?
    <br><br>
    5. To save students some money, should they all buy Fuji film here
    or in Nagoya? Xray is a possible problem in airports.
    <br><br>
    6. Do you know about certain aspects of Japanes life that "must" be
    captured? Any useful information will certainly be appreciated.
     
  2. A nice point and shoot with a fixed lens would be more than adequate, unless they want to invest more money. Should use C-41 film because of developing ease - anywhere. Buy film in the US and place in xray pouch for protection, then refill at will. Pouch may be needed for return trip as well. 1 lens should be in the 35mm focal length range for newbees. Go to Barnes & Noble for a "textbook" - a simple text on how to photograph - there are many inexpensive goods ones. Try to choose one of travel size. Aloha
     
  3. And you suppose to teach other people about photography, an art form that looks like you have no idea about it! What a joke! But no problem, you can always ask for help on photo.net and next day impress them again with your knowledge and vast cultural education. Do they pay you, too?
     
  4. I'm wondering what you'll teach them on Japanese culture...
     
  5. Man there are some snarky people on this forum.

    Raid, this is for a college 6 week study abroad thing right? I'm assuming that you know which students will be participating. Why not contact them, and ask them what they have in terms of equipment? I'd think an slr with manual controls available and a 50 or a short zoom would be a pretty reasonable base line. Maybe make a recomendation about where to get a cheap (used) one for those on a budget. As for film, I think it's been established that 400 speed film travels pretty safe. Tell them all to go out and buy a couple of 4 packs of fuji 400. Skip the black and white unless you want to do c41 stuff. Skip the text book.
     
  6. A little snarky perhaps, but the questions asked suggest Raid does not have a very good handle on things, certainly not enough to be a qualified teacher on the topic.
     
  7. Raid,

    Some folks have already commented about the equipment. Your project to capture "certain aspects of Japanese life" or "Japanese culture" would be a different matter, more akin to travel photography. "Spirit of Place" by Bob Krist would make for a good reading suggestion. Susan McCartney's "Travel Photography" is a good one, as well. You may also want to post at the Travel Photography forum. People familiar with Japan, especially locals, would be able to give you good advice regarding places to shoot, buying and processing film, and the like. Most of the people in that forum, I find, are genuinely helpful, and usually post replies only when they have something to actually contribute.

    Good luck!
     
  8. T o some of you:Take it easy. I have plenty of knowledge and experience on teaching photography. If I want to get the "best information" from photographers who hopefully live around Nagoya, there is no need to be sarcastic about it. This is a website to learn from. As a university professor I never give up the wish to learn "even more".
    Maybe I should not have asked individuals who don't want to share their experiences. Maybe you have none?
     
  9. Paul: I haven't yet been informed who will be enrolled in my class, but I will make your suggested choice a possible option if it is "impossible" for any student to come up with an SLR.


    "A nice point and shoot with a fixed lens would be more than adequate, unless they want to invest more money. Should use C-41 film because of developing ease - anywhere. Buy film in the US and place in xray pouch for protection, then refill at will. Pouch may be needed for return trip as well. 1 lens should be in the 35mm focal length range for newbees. Go to Barnes & Noble for a "textbook" - a simple text on how to photograph - there are many inexpensive goods ones. Try to choose one of travel size. Aloha"
     
  10. Mihaela: I have over 25 years experience in photography and in being an educator. Your conclusion : "And you suppose to teach other people about photography, an art form that looks like you have no idea about it!" is rather misplaced. If you want to contribute in a constructive manner, post your suggestions to my questions.
     
  11. Roland: Your reply:" I'm wondering what you'll teach them on Japanese culture..."
    There are professionals involved who specialize in Japanese culture, some of which are Japanese. I will focus on my expertise area (quality control) and photography.
     
  12. Matt: I appreciate seeing a reply from a "mature minded" person here.

    "Man there are some snarky people on this forum. "
    ==> Yes, I have noted so. That's OK. I don't need their arrogance.

    I agree with you that most likely C-41 film is the way to go. Since most labs in Japan provide a faster turn around for Fuji film, I may as well require Fuji. I still don't know who is enrolled since this is a special exchange program that is being handled by a center that handles programs with Japan. If I knew, I would have required us to meet several times to work out issues related to the course.


    "Raid, this is for a college 6 week study abroad thing right? I'm assuming that you know which students will be participating. Why not contact them, and ask them what they have in terms of equipment? I'd think an slr with manual controls available and a 50 or a short zoom would be a pretty reasonable base line. Maybe make a recomendation about where to get a cheap (used) one for those on a budget. As for film, I think it's been established that 400 speed film travels pretty safe. Tell them all to go out and buy a couple of 4 packs of fuji 400. Skip the black and white unless you want to do c41 stuff. Skip the text book."
     
  13. Frank: I am by no means "lost" and would not survive without answers to my questions. I asked the simplest questions to get some feedback. As a distinguished researcher and a photographer with published photo essays and many award winning exhbits, I am quite confident about my ability to deliver a first class course when asked to do so.

    "A little snarky perhaps, but the questions asked suggest Raid does not have a very good handle on things, certainly not enough to be a qualified teacher on the topic."
     
  14. Re the snarky comments near the beginning of the post, anybody who's been around academia know that you don't have to be from a certain culture in order to teach a course on it. If you have the most academic knowledge, you are the 'expert.' Perhaps Raid has, e.g., a good grasp on Japanese culture pre-Kyoto-Edo power transition that many students could learn from. Regards
     
  15. You might have handled a camera or two for this 25 years but this doesn't make a photographer. Nor if you bought 2 Leica bodies for $10000. And if you are as good college or high school teacher as you are a photographer you are teaching some idiots full of self esteem and empty headed. Lost time and energy. IT"S ALL ABOUT THE LIGHT!!! It?s not about lenses, cameras, films or processing. I attached few images shot with Ricoh GR1 and Olympus Infinity Stylus. Critiques are welcome.
     
  16. Another one
     
  17. Last one
     
  18. Some of your questions are a bit odd. Why on earth would you restrict students to rangefinder/slr or tlr cameras? If you are teaching technical aspects of photography just make sure shutter and aperture can be manually set. If you are just teaching people to see creatively any camera is fine.

    Nagoya's a great place. I got all my stuff developed at Marmo in Irinaka- it's a couple blocks up from the subway station towards Nanzan. You can find cheap Fuji consumer film anywhere- check out the photo shops under Nagoya station for some very cheap prices.
    B&W is expensive to develop commercially. Will you be somewhere where you can develop it yourself, like at a school?

    You need a tripod for night shots. Nagoya's safe so if you are going to teach people low-light or night shots encourage them to get tripods.

    #6 is a question that students should answer with their pictures. It's up to them.

    Have fun at Aichi Expo 2005, too.
     
  19. "There are professionals involved who specialize in Japanese culture, some of which are
    Japanese. I will focus on my expertise area (quality control) and photography."
    Great! Have fun and good luck!
     
  20. Hi Raid, I also use a Fujica G690BL. If I were a student on your course I would prefer to use the Fujica for quality control, given the format and price. A digicam would be useful as a lightmeter.... The chance to shoot in Japan seems wonderful too. I think the Japanese culture is seen differently by the west than in Japan. Perhaps the students will prefer digital capture because of it's popularity in the west. Perhaps the west prefers film to capture the ancient spirit of the East. I think the basic principles learned when using a rangefinder and light meter are valuable and lasting memories. However, I do sympathise that some students will only have digital point and shoots so really there is much to span in your shoes, good luck. Perhaps giving the students the choice of using what tools they want to shoot will be easiest for them, but not for you! Maybe the students will learn from each other too, if they are all using slightly different tools. Of course your own choice of photographic tools will be interesting for the students too, so if you can cram all that into a basic course, then great!

    Here is what I would do given the chance:

    Work out what the students want to shoot, and what I want to shoot.
    Then work out what I can teach them about doing that. I would use my Fujica G690BL with all the lenses and extras I am still saving for! I would use tripod and non-tripod techniques. I would shoot my own style and let them shoot theirs simultaneously, but instructing as to the similarities and differences between our tools and objectives consitently. Perhaps most importantly I would encourage the students to participate with each other as much as possible and not to simply copy what I do. I would aim for a goal on the last day, perhaps making a large print of a subject we had all shot. So as a group of like minded people we could then appraise each others efforts objectively.


    I am a beginner and as such I appreciate the chance to learn from experienced folks like you, cheers.
     
  21. Ditto Range Flounder re-academia, and what a great screen name, made me laugh!
     
  22. Raid W. Amin , mar 30, 2005; 01:10 p.m.
    Frank: I am by no means "lost" and would not survive without answers to my questions. I asked the simplest questions to get some feedback. As a distinguished researcher and a photographer with published photo essays and many award winning exhbits, I am quite confident about my ability to deliver a first class course when asked to do so.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    Read this response carefully.
     
  23. Frank,
    Why don't you clarify your comment.
     
  24. Mihaela: How do you infer that I am not a photographer? Has it occured to you that a person can be both a professor and a professional photographer?


    "You might have handled a camera or two for this 25 years but this doesn't make a photographer"
     
  25. Roger: I said "SLR" and not "TLR".
     
  26. Range: I will not teach anything about the Japanese culture.
    I will teach a course on quality control, which is my area of expertise, and I will overlook a course on travel photography in Japan. It's basically this.



    "Re the snarky comments near the beginning of the post, anybody who's been around academia know that you don't have to be from a certain culture in order to teach a course on it. If you have the most academic knowledge, you are the 'expert.' Perhaps Raid has, e.g., a good grasp on Japanese culture pre-Kyoto-Edo power transition that many students could learn from. Regards"
     
  27. Wow Raid, you're really getting the third degree here! Maybe you should teach an on-line course in culture to these NON-SUBSCRIBING photo.net drive-by muggers.

    I hope you and your family have a wonderful time in Japan. I'm sure everything will go perfectly. When you return, please put up some pictures and let us know the lovely things you experienced.

    PS. Have you thought about taking all that classic "New in the Box" Leica gear that you discovered in your closet. Lots of Yen waiting for your gear.

    Sayonara!
     
  28. "...NON-SUBSCRIBING photo.net drive-by muggers..."

    I'm so sorry!
     
  29. Raid,

    "...and (I) would not survive without answers to my questions."
    At least you're not saying you're an English professor.

    Raid, sorry to be rude, but the kind of questions you were asking suggested to me that you did not have a good grasp of what you were being asked to teach. Another poster also suggested that your questions were "odd". Given your stated experience and credentials, the questions you asked do sound odd to me. It is as if an English professor asking others how to write an essay, for example. It struck me that the "quality" of your questions is not consistent with your stated experience and credentials. Do you see what I'm trying to say?
     
  30. Japanese airports and taking film through under 800 speed will be no problem at all. Buy your film there from Yodobashi or Bic. The prices are very near to US now and that way, you don't have to schlep it in.

    You will not need lead bags. They are a nuisance for there are no problems about the x-ray carry-on scanners but never, ever put film in checked luggage or it's a goner. If you feel you must, you can request a hand-check and get it.

    Conni
     
  31. Well, Raid - I think your project isn't about equipment at all. What counts is your visual eye
    and your pedagogic abilities.
     
  32. Frank: Maybe I was trying not to sound like a professor who knows what he is talking about.
     
  33. Roland: You are 100% correct here.
    By the way, my photos are marketed in Asia by Mega Press (one of the most prestigious stock agencies in Japan).
     
  34. That' s fine, Amin. By the way, I never had problems with xray, even with 3200ASA films.
     
  35. Vic: Thank you very much for your friendly comments. As for the Leica stuff, I will think about selling some it during the summer months.
     
  36. Mihaela: not bad. But I recommend you to visit one of Amin's workshops one day.
     
  37. You can be whatever you like to be, or what you let people know you are. Question is how good you can be? Please read your own questions again and again and again and think back of all your published work and credentials, etc. Now does it sound to you that are you qualified enough to teach others about photography? I mean, come on! Admit it: you have no clue about it. But you?ll gonna do it anyway, because that's all about self esteem. Doesn't matter how good you are or qualified you are, once you have the opportunity you can and you'll do it. Problem is self esteem knocks out common sense, which is more important to some of us, common sense that makes you ask yourself if you are right or wrong every second of your life.

    And I attached some more samples of my work, maybe you need them to show to those Japanese students. Photos made by somebody not represented by the most prestigious agency in Japan.
     
  38. Some more...
     
  39. More...
     
  40. That's it.
     
  41. http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=428207
     
  42. You guys here are weird. Raid, why not contact Karen Nakamura, the photoethnography.com lady? This question is right up her alley.
     
  43. Dave: Thanks for your tip. Some people here move up from being B-holes to A-holes, so I won't bother with them. On the other hand, many people here are very nice and helpful.
     
  44. Mihaela,
    Have you ever been fishing?
    Maybe you would like to train as a Baitor. This is guy putting the bait on the hook. After some training you may become a Senior Baitor. After even more training you'll be a Master Baitor. Maybe you already are one?
     
  45. Your last reply just showed who you really are and those other people opinions don't matter to you unless they say how great you are and approve all your ideas and actions. Oh, great!
     
  46. Raid, I don't envy what you've been put through the past few hours. One idiot posting dozens of photos that look like they were probably ripped off from another photographer, or photographers? A photo.ne subscriber for 4 or 5 years and 98% of their postings on this one thread? Don't make no sense! (Intentional bad grammar.)

    I'd go along with a C-41 medium to high speed (ISO 200 or 400) film, either color or B&W. The camera should be capable of setting distance, aperture and shutter speed otherwise there's really no way to teach the basics. That pretty much limits you to film cameras. I don't see where it really matters if it's rangefinder or SLR or TLR, 35mm or medium format. Forget the tripod. A normal (50mm) lens would teach more "seeing" discipline than using a zoom. The quality would likely be better too.
     
  47. "I'd go along with a C-41 medium to high speed (ISO 200 or 400) film, either color or B&W. The camera should be capable of setting distance, aperture and shutter speed otherwise there's really no way to teach the basics. That pretty much limits you to film cameras. I don't see where it really matters if it's rangefinder or SLR or TLR, 35mm or medium format. Forget the tripod. A normal (50mm) lens would teach more "seeing" discipline than using a zoom. The quality would likely be better too."

    Very good advice, Al, but don't YOU think it's odd that someone as experienced and credentialled as Raid would need such basic and common sense advice?

    I am not a poster who has attacked Raid, I've just pointed out the incongruency of his questions with his stated experience. Doesn't anyone else notice this?
     
  48. Mr. Kaplan, nobody called you names. And I don't remember seeing your photos in any of the folders on photo.net. All the posted photos belong to me, believe it or not. The wine rule, older means better doesn't apply to humans. Too bad. But Mr. Amin just was the cherry on the cake with his questions today. By the way, there is another president now, go and shake his hand, too.
    00BgHA-22606984.jpg
     
  49. Al,
    I also have this preference myself; a 50mm lens allows you to focus on composition and it allows the students and myself to have critique sessions of work done with the same focal length. I initially favored 200ASA film, but will also ask for 400ASA film for situations when light is dim. The reason I asked about tripod use is the fact that Japan's cities can be very crowded, and carrying a tripod could become a burden. While I usually use a heavy tripod in my photography, I don't see a real reason, other than available light photography, where it is a must. Thanks for your inpuit, Al.
     
  50. Raid never said that he didn't know what the F*** he was doing. He only asked for input and suggestions, nothing wrong with that. As he's the first to admit, he doesn't know everything and life is an ongoing learning experience. Why that should result in so much unrestrained negativity is puzzling to me. I suppose that its easier to tear down than to build up, but I always thought that we came here to learn and to share knowledge in a civilized way. Let's try to keep it that way. Lighten up, put a smile on your face, and extend a hand to your fellow photographers.
     
  51. Frank,
    I should have mentioned in my posting that I already have obtained in another posting very useful information on film developing in Japan and also on Japanese photographers and books. I just wanted to feel out what photographers is the [experienced] Leica Forum would suggest to me in response to my very basic questions. I on purpose asked very simple questions. This was not done by mistake. I know, this could sound strange, but I wanted direct responses here and not an evaluation of my professional degrees.

    I have never taught a photography course outside the USA, and that's why I have been collecting useful information on how to lecture a course from a different perspective than a typical arts/photography course would be offered at a college or university. Instructions were to include "somehow" the Japanese culture. Your comments and the comments of a few others were not helpful in this regard. I competed with other professors through a thorough process to get the Japan Program trip. I have over 25 years of experience in photography, but I have never taught a course like this before where emphasis has to be on the culture of the country being visited.
     
  52. People please!!! Why the need to descend to a mental and emotional hell. The really weird thing is that "Leica" was not even the subject matter.

    Even experienced photographers can learn from each other. What's wrong with asking some questions, which to the Einsteins would appear basic? There are many giants of photography here, and they willingly share the wealth of knowledge and experience that they have built up over the years. Why mug someone for asking a question?

    Hey Michaela, your pictures are good! Please post some more. I can't believe you're not published yet.
     
  53. Mihaela, up until 2 weeks ago the pic on my profile page showed me shaking hands with the "new" president's brother Jeb a year or so ago. I have another shot with him 16 years ago. Why bring that up? You tell us nothing about yourself. My life is an open book. I've nothing to hide. I switched pix there because too many people were asking me if I was a Republican. Maybe I should put both photos there. It's nobody's business which way I cast my vote. But I do vote.
     
  54. Al,
    I appreciate what you're trying to do here. <br>
    I will enjoy my trip to Japan, and I will give my students excellent training in photography and in quality control.
    We will have site visits to the Toyota company in Nagoya and three other companies. This way, my students will have hands on experience on the use of statistical quality control and total quality management techniques used in Japan. We will also be toured in Japan to major cultural and historical sites. This will enable my students to capture parts of the Japanese culture on film [hopefully].
     
  55. Michaela, thanks for posting that link to the photo of Bill Clinton and myself. Today I attended the funeral of my long time friend Jeff Mell who died a couple days ago at age 51. He worked for many years for our local congressman, Bill Lehman, until Bill retired, and then last week Bill died at age 91. We expected that. We were shocked when Jeff died. Too young!

    Jeff was the one who called me to set up shoots for everything from the dedication of a new post office to a fund raiser for a presidential candidate. You might think me old but I've tried to be part of my community also, I've tried to make things better. I don't know how many thousands of unpaid hours I've given to volunteer work, serving on municipal advisory boards and not-for-profits' boards of directors. Along the way I've met and shook hands with many dignitaries. Don't find fault with people who are trying to make life better for everyone. I know, we photographers are supposed to be like flies on the wall, just observing and recording. But I'm not talking journalism here. I don't have to be unbiased. I can still have ethics, unlike some who come to visit here and fancy themselves flies on carrion...
     
  56. I think that maybe the reason I reacted negatively to Raid's post of basic questions can be explained by "sour grapes". His basic questions lead me to the assumption that he wasn't all that competent. (If you re-read what was asked, do you not ask yourself: How can this guy teach this?) I would love to have the assignment that Raid has been given. (I couldn't in reality do it due to family and employment responsibilities.) I have 30 years experience in photography, I have taught photography at the community college level, and I spent a year in Japan (teaching English). So, I see an amazing job go to someone whose quality of questions made me, and apparently others, question Raid's ability to do the job, and due to sour grapes, I point out the fact based on his questioning, he maybe isn't up to the task. I agree that I haven't added anything positive to this thread, other than the fact that it has become pretty entertaining to read, and I haven't called anybody any names.
     
  57. And since we're looking at each others' pictures, you can see some of my stuff here:

    http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php/cat/500/ppuser/575
     
  58. OK gentlemen, the apologies are noted and I'm sure accepted by Raid. Let's stop the bickering. If anyone has something constructive to post that might help Raid, great. Otherwise it's time to move on to another subject. Time perhaps to end this thread.
     
  59. My apologies if I was out of line in any way.
     
  60. I certainly have a "thick skin", being originally from Iraq. A few negative comments will not discourage me. I may also spend one semester in Egypt soon [not photography] as I may be invited to teach at the German University in Cairo, and I am planning to come back with plenty of story telling photographs. My statistics training has taught me to always ask questions, and that's what I do to get the best possible information. If my questions seemed "unworthy" to some, then this is not my problem. I have always enjoyed photo.net for exchange of information and opinions regarding photography related issues. Let's keep personal attacks out of here.

    Frank: I could have elected to teach two statistics courses instead, but I am willing to take a risk to give our students something they will enjoy more than statistics and something that may result in a visual record of how my stents "saw" Japan.
     
  61. Raid,

    Remember the axiom: Those who can, DO. Those who can't, TEACH!

    I lived and worked in Japan in the 1980's and 90's. Things may have
    changed since then.

    Jerry
     
  62. Jerry: I do ... and then I also teach. Your axiom does not apply here.

    Raid,
    "Remember the axiom: Those who can, DO. Those who can't, TEACH!

    I lived and worked in Japan in the 1980's and 90's. Things may have changed since then.

    Jerry"
     
  63. Before ending the thread, I'll answer some of your questions. I'm an immigrant, now US resident who did a lot of odd jobs, found photography at an early age and realized that nothing else matters. "Lost" time in technical college in Europe for 6 years, everything was so easy that I wonder how I could resist for so long. After school I learned five languages, building computers and restoring classic cars. I traveled a lot and saw almost all the countries in the world. I published some of my work in some magazines in Europe and US, but that was long time ago. I was hired by some modeling agencies in Europe to provide portfolios for their models and some companies for advertising, especially construction and real estate. Found out that there is not much creativity left behind the scenes, so once that I disagreed with the director of photography, I quit even in the middle of an assignment. Life is too short to take crap from anybody. Unfulfilled dreams? I have a project I never finished because of different reasons. Got married, have a family and so on. Why I didn't post anything until now? Simply because I have no time. But I got sick seeing stupid photos taken with $3500 rare lenses that tell you nothing without a long caption next to, and their authors being proud. Everybody should remember that a picture is more than a thousand words and photography is a form of art, so try to be at your best every time you depress that shutter release button. At least I try every time. And doesn?t really matters the camera or the lens as long as you know their qualities and limits. What I like: photos that don't let you indifferent even if are not my style, smart people with great ideas and cameras that don't need repairs in the middle of an assignment. What I dislike: stupid photos that let you indifferent, people that can't reply in an elegant, educated manner and those who can ever think that I'll show somebody else work and say it's mine. Here is the last batch and I promise I'll never bother you all with my photos again.
    00BgKL-22608484.jpg
     
  64. If you are going to Nagoya, watch the movie "GOZU" by Takashi Miike.
    It's an excellent movie entirely shot in Nagoya area. Netflix have
    it. You can see a glimpse of life in Nagoya from that movie. Also,
    Nagoya is famous for Fried Shrimp, or in Japanese, "Ebi Furai". I
    hope you enjoy Japan!
     
  65. Hello Syuji,

    Thank you very much for your tip to see the movie GOZU.<br> I will try to get a copy of it and view the movie. I am sure that my wife and I will enjoy trying out Ebi Furai. <br>I am looking forward to visiting Japan.
     
  66. Some nice photos of your son there! Thanks for sharing them with us. But don't walk off in a huff, never to return. Visit or stick around, your choice. Try to add something constructive since it seems that you do have the background and qualifications. As for the people with $3500 cameras, why not? They can afford them, or at least are willing to sacrifice owning other things so they can enjoy owning one. Some people also live in five million dollar homes, drive one hundred thousand dollar cars, wear expensive suits and shoes, because they can afford them also. None of which has anything to do with Raid's upcoming trip to Japan, or how he's going to teach the course.

    There is some truth to the old saw about "those who can, do, those who can't, teach" but it isn't a universal truth. Partly it's due to academia's insistance on "credentials" in the form of degrees rather than experience and demonstrated skils in a given field. Partly it's due to the fact that there are plenty of people who are far from the greatest in their field but have a gift for imparting that knowledge that they do have to others. Not everyone is a great teacher, no matter how good they are at what they know and do. Not every one of Raid's students is going to be National Geographic material when they finish that 6 week course. If they learn the basics of photography and a better understanding of another culture Raid will have done what he set out to do. I'm sure that he'll do a fine job.
     
  67. Sorry Raid that I do not have any suggestions for you. This thread is a great example of how not to respond to a question. It should be placed on the front page as a sticky in the learning section. I guess the anonymity the written word gives a person also gives that person the courage to be destructive. All we can do is pray for people like Mihaela T. And in helping to keep the Peace, I am enclosing a picture of a baby. This baby was 21 hours old when I took this photo. Remember that we are all babies in one way or the other. We all have a lot of growing up to do. Some more so than others.
    00BgPu-22610384.jpg
     
  68. Michaela - your posted photos are in general okay but far from perfect. They want too much to look nice and visually pleasing but have compositional problems in the same time. Let's not talk about the colours, which are way oversaturated. This for my taste, anyway; i'm sure lots of people will like them, and they can make it to the photo.net top pages any time. Reading again and again the questions of Raid, i still cannot see the reason why you answered him at all.

    Raid, good luck with the courses.
     
  69. GOZU is a little bit eccentric movie. So, don't show it to your
    children.
     
  70. Forget Gozu and watch Ichi the killer by the same director, that will give you a real taste of japanese everyday life. [​IMG]
     
  71. Pradeep: the photo of the baby is beautiful. It really shows a sense of "relief" to be there.
     
  72. Csab: Which two TLR cameras are in your posted photo of yourself?
     
  73. "Reading again and again the questions of Raid, i still cannot see the reason why you answered him at all. "

    Csab: I am glad that there still are open minded people here who felt OK to give their own advices regarding some of my questions. For example, Al's reply gave me in a nutshell useful hints.
     
  74. "Al's reply gave me in a nutshell useful hints."

    But Raid, did you not know that stuff already? If so, how can it be new and useful, and if not....
     
  75. Ok: We've now seen every photo Mihaela? has shot (most of them much too dark for my taste). Seems like every forum has at least one individual who seems better at shooting off their mouth than their camera. LOOK AT ME! HEY, HEY. LOOK AT ME!!

    Raid. Hope you have a wonderful trip. I'm outta here.
     
  76. Wayne: I wish I could just remove this posting. It has created more negative and bitter sounding feedback than I thought possible. I privately know many other professional photographers who can give me feedback offline, but I thought it would be nice to include fellow PN contributors.
     
  77. 1. What type of equipment should I require of my students? Does it matter if all students [and myself] use film based or digital cameras? What about rangefinder vs. SLR? It may be difficult to require students to buy rangefinder cameras at this stage.

    A; If the goal is to develop photographic seeing, then any kind of photo taking equipment is fine. If the goal is to teach photography basics, then cameras with manually adjustable apertures and shutter speeds would be necessary. Their style (slr, rangefinder) is not important as long as quick photofinishing can be obtained, which may rule out medium and large format cameras. Should you require your students to buy rangefinder cameras at this stage? No, that would be silly.

    2. If a film based camera is used, should I require B&W film, color or both? I am thinking of having a weekly critique session of their work.

    A: For fastest feedback time, colour neg would be best. If time allows, encourage students to at least try a roll of B+W.

    3. Is a textbook necessary for such a course? I could easily teach them the basics of photography and have then write photo essays (journalistic style) on what they see.

    A: A qualified photo instructor will be able to teach what is necessary. Providing a bibliography to furthur students own reading would be good.

    4. Is a 50mm lens sufficient? Is a tripod needed? Is there any particular equipment that you would suggest?

    5. To save students some money, should they all buy Fuji film here or in Nagoya? Xray is a possible problem in airports.

    A: Let them buy the film in Japan. The cost savings is not too great and you will support local business.

    6. Do you know about certain aspects of Japanes life that "must" be captured? Any useful information will certainly be appreciated.

    A: The daily life of every culture can be interesting photographically. Try not to overlook the mundane while persueing the unique aspects of Japanese culture such as the religious festivals, and the Buddist temples and Shinto shrines.


    There how's that? I fell somewhat embarassed giving such basic advice to such an experienced and credentialled photographer.
     
  78. Oops, missed question number 4.

    4. Is a 50mm lens sufficient? Is a tripod needed? Is there any particular equipment that you would suggest?

    A: A 50 mmlens would be sufficient, however other focal lengths can be used to achieve an effect not possible with a normal lens. A tripod is useful when using long lenses and for very low light photography. A flash is another useful photo accessory and the concept of daylight fill-flash is useful to teach to photography beginners.
     
  79. Frank: Thanks for your detailed response. Now why couldn't you have done this from the start? Thanks again.
     
  80. Did you really need help with these questions? A professor, 25 years of photography experience, numerous awards and citations, photo course teacher in the US, published phtographer, and represented by the most prestigious stock photo agency in Japan? It still doesn't make any sense to me, but hey, I'm glad I was helpful.
     
  81. Now why couldn't you have done this from the start?

    To put it bluntly, someone qualified to teach this shouldn't need to have to ask these questions. Sorry, but that's just how I feel.
     
  82. That's fine, Frank. People have different opinions every day.
     
  83. Frank, let it go. You're adding nothing constructive to the conversation. Raid isn't "to big" to ask others for advice or so "full of it" that he feels compelled to belittle others. We need people like Raid here. His query should have brought forth a bunch of suggestions that would be of use not only to him but to many others who come here seeking knowledge and advice. Instead, this thread was hijacked by not just one but several pompous individuals trying to shout from the roof tops "Look at ME!" by questioning Raids abilities and credentials. Raid, I wish you the best of success this summer. Try to post a few of your photos while you're there so we can get to meet your students, and see what they're doing and learning. Maybe post some of their work too. Thanks.
     
  84. "To put it bluntly, someone qualified to teach this shouldn't need to have to ask these questions. Sorry, but that's just how I feel."

    So why did you answer him?
     
  85. I wish I hadn't.
     
  86. rowlett

    rowlett Moderator

    Heh, I think a lot of people wish you hadn't.
     
  87. A friendly gentleman from Japan contacted me today. I don't know him, but he may have looked at what went on here in this posting discussion. Anyways, he offered to show me and my family around in Tokyo. I guess, this posting was in the end rewarding.
     
  88. Ben: I am sorry not to have responded earlier to you. The GL690 is a very heavy camera, and it may be unsuitable for travel overseas in my case since I also have to carry two babies on the plane. It is a very nice camera though. I use it often.

    I will try an approach similar to what you described by "letting students loose" and have them use their own creativity to capture interesting images. I made sure that I am not liable for their safety if anyone gets hurt. Such things can be very important when it comes to teaching and students performing activities in a class project.
     
  89. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    I think I will send my son to this thread to show him that drugs aren't necessary for teenagers to have an out-of-mind experience.
     
  90. Hi Raid,

    I can only share my own experience in Japan. When I first came here in fall of 2000 for a three week trip around the islands, I brought an M6 and a 35, 50 and a 90. I shot strictly provia. That was in Tokyo and Hokkaido. I got lots of very nice shots. On the way back down from Hokkaido to Tokyo, the Leica with 35mm asph flew out of my backpack which I had not zipped shut absentmindedly. I do this kind of thing all the time, like going to an atm and withdrawing money only to walk away with the receipt and leave the cash in the atm!<p>Anyway, the Leica became airborn and landed with a "thud," or was it "clunk" on the train station platform. The rewind lever was demolished, but everything else was fine on the camera. The lens though seemed stiff on the focus at the close range. Anway, this was halfway through my trip.<p>I took the 35 to a store in Tokyo and traded for an EOS 5 with a 28-105mm. The pics I got in Kyoto and Himeji with that EOS were much more interesting than the ones I got with the Leica. The only place the Canon lost was in sheer resolution and color. Otherwise I highly recommend the EOS.<p>For equipment I would recommend a good AF camera with a wide range zoom lens, and a 50mm as a low light back up. I would simply not bother with the technical side of photography. Who cares? When you look at a beautiful scene with your eye, do you need to be an expert on optics and the structure of the eye to appreciate beauty? No. It is not necessary to be a good technician to be a good photographer. What counts is one's eye. So I would encourage the students to use what ever camera they like. Then, I would critique their results based on your ability to help them improve in the area of capturing captivating images. Who care about equipment or material? The result is what counts.
     
  91. BANG! BANG! BANG!

    Peace is that glorious silence when everyone is pausing to reload.

    Sorry that this is not relevant to the topic at hand but I thought yet another irrelvant and non-constructive comment wouldn't hurt.
     
  92. You can also try "VISIOR Q" by Takashi Miike. It's a heart warming
    story on family value. Definitely, do not watch with your children.
     
  93. Claude, <br>
    I am more and more tilting to letting students choose their own type of cameras and lenses, with the condition of using a film-based camera so that direct comparisons are easier than if some use a digital and some a film based camera. I also agree that the most important factor in a good photographer is having a "good eye" for beautiful things. The technical aspects can be taught and learned easily.
     
  94. Syuji: Is your warning to keep kids away from the two suggested movies due to nudity and/or violence?
     
  95. Raid,

    Yes. The movie has both nudity and violence. They are very weired
    movie, but you can see some glimpse of extreme side of Japan.

    For the entire family, one of the recent Godzilla movie might be a
    good choice. Also, I think "Lost in Translation" captured modern
    Japan very well.
     
  96. Raid, you need to connect with a certain Mr. A. Shishin. I understand he is marginally familiar with Leica gear and resides in Japan, near a bridge.
     
  97. Vic: What do you know about Mr. Shishin?
    Is he a member of PN and does he post things in the Leica Forum?

    ======================
    "Raid, you need to connect with a certain Mr. A. Shishin. I understand he is marginally familiar with Leica gear and resides in Japan, near a bridge."
     
  98. Vic,
    Thanks for the tip. I will try to get in touch with him somehow.
     
  99. I apologize for my bull-headedness.
     
  100. Jeff: Let us know what your son thinks about this "out-of-mind experience". It certainly wasn't intended to be one.

    "I think I will send my son to this thread to show him that drugs aren't necessary for teenagers to have an out-of-mind experience."
     
  101. Vic: I am in the process of contacting Mr. Shishin. Maybe he can meet with my class.
     

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