Odd Large Wooden Camera

Discussion in 'Extreme, Retro, Instant and More' started by brian_n._duram, Feb 21, 2016.

  1. [​IMG][​IMG]Hello, Helping a friend go through his fathers camera collection[​IMG]. This camera is Huge has an 8"x10" Curtain Folmer & Schwing Shutter and a 50cm Carl Zeiss Lens. Camera is roughly 27" long x 10" wide made of wood. It looks like an Aerial, but not sure. Any and all info would greatly be helpful. Sorry I can't figure out the image upload yet.[​IMG]
    Brian
     
  2. Seeing just the pictures I think: its obviously cobbled together from existing parts. The darker wood seems recently added. Since you have a ground glass I would try to figure out how close focusing the 2 inches bellows draw permit.
    The rest depends, Maybe another collector has an use or space for it or....
     
  3. 50cm is 500mm so yes the lens is about right I too believe this was home built with the back of an old 8x10 that the bellows went bad on. most likely some type of Macro setup.
     
  4. It looks like a WWI aerial camera that has been modified to take sheet film holders.
     
  5. The Graflex focal plane shutter is interesting. I know it was offered as an accessory for other cameras. Definitely looks like an aerial camera. That is where I would start. Could be WW1 or WW2 vintage. Remember in 1942 all resources were pushed to wartime production. It could be a 'need it now' bastard or someones hobby project.
    Chris
     
  6. I agree with you and Allen - very much the style of WWI aerial cameras though I would guess not one used in war but possibly a homemade version bulit for aerail surveying in the 1920's or so.
    In WWI aerial photography was almost the first aerial activity to become organised, before bombing or dog fighting, and it developed very rapidly. Aerial cameras were purpose built such as the one shown in the photo here :
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11667251
    and
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerial_reconnaissance_in_World_War_I#/media/File:RFC_aircraft_with_aerial_reconnaissance_camera.jpg

    Notice the reinforced corners on the wooden cone section and the way the cameras have bespoke handles for handheld shots or are mounted to the aircraft.

    So I am guessing someone in the 1920's or 30's wanted to do some aerial photography or survey work and adapted a focal plane shutter and plate film holder with a handmade wooden cone part and various door handles. But I can't see any reason why it should not have worked and produced successful aerial photos.
    If you could say what the Zeiss lens details are - serial number, aperture, any name such as tessar, protar etc we could give you a date for the lens.
     
  7. rdm

    rdm

    Would love to see some photos of the lense standard.
     

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