NEC PA242W-BK vs EIZO CS240

Discussion in 'Digital Darkroom' started by giovanni_allievi|1, Dec 23, 2014.

  1. Hi,

    I'd like to upgrade to a wide gamut monitor.
    I've narrowed the choice down to the NEC PA242W-BK and the EIZO CS240.
    What are the main differencies between the two ?
    I like the NEC Picture by Picture feature that allows to see the same image on screen rendered side by side
    each with its selectable color space (i.e: sRGB vs native gamut). Seems cool to predict immediately how the web version would render.
    Besides this feature, which I don't seem to find in the EIZO, they seem similar to me (ok, the NEC costs about 200€ more and I'd get the SpectraView SW for the NEC too)

    Your thoughts ?

    Thanks,
    Giovanni
     
  2. EricM

    EricM Planet Eric

    Nice choices! And my thoughts are that for a fraction of the cost, another option is the 10 bit Adobe RGB Dell u2711. They are only found on the used market though and don't come up often.
     
  3. Besides this feature, which I don't seem to find in the EIZO, they seem similar to me (ok, the NEC costs about 200€ more and I'd get the SpectraView SW for the NEC too)​
    And you do want that software option! Don’t even think about using anything but the NEC software to calibrate this system, you’ll cripple it’s capabilities. You could use the free MultiProfiler but you’ll have more control over the process if you use their SpectraView software (which is different in the US than Europe although that’s starting to change. The US Product is IMHO a better solution but both take full capability of the display hardware).
    The Dell mentioned isn’t close to the NEC in terms of it’s technology. One huge difference is the Dell is a CCFL (Fluorescent) blacklight, the NEC is GB-R LED. In terms of calibration, GB-R LED is vastly preferable. It uses less energy and will last much longer due to this backlit technology. You get what you pay for.
     
  4. Thanks Andrew.
    About the SpectraView: I can only see one download link, not differentiated between US/non US
    (http://www.necdisplay.com/support-and-services/spectra-view-II/Downloads).
    Out of curiosity: why do you say the US version is better ?
    Anyway, any big differences between the two (NEC/EIZO) that you know of ?
    Thanks
     
  5. The European software is BasICColor which is a good product but I prefer SpectraView. Better GUI (not that either are award winners), better control over setting White Point visually with a slider. I think you may have to stick with the BasICColor version if you buy a PA in Europe. It will certainly do the job for you well and most importantly, is built to take advantage of the display electronics which no other products can do.
     
  6. The Eizo CS240 is the entry level/budget model in the 24" Coloredge series. In terms of value for money it's an incredibly good deal, IMO impossible to beat in today's market.
    The NEC PA242 is probably a better monitor overall, but also more expensive. The comparable Eizo model is CX241, at roughly the same price.
    Dell is a whole other ballgame. Half the price and worth it.
    As Andrew said (it can't be said often enough) - whatever you end up with, make sure you get the edition that has calibration software included, or factor in the cost of buying it separately. That's NEC Spectraview II (in the US), or Eizo Colornavigator.
     
  7. First, I tried to obtain the Dell monitor. They shipped it, recalled it before delivery, and I was forced to contact the card company to get the money back. Terrible customer service by phone too. I even wrote to Michael Dell to find out why they never delivered the monitor but did not get an answer. I will never own a Dell product given my first attempt at buying one of their products.
    At this point I ordered the NEC 24" model. It took a while to arrive from B&H but it was worth the wait. It only takes a few minutes to set up along with the calibration materials. Every cable you can think of comes with it but you only need the basic connectors.
    It was a replacement for a junky Samsung I was forced to use for a year due to a lack of money. Finally, no yellow color cast, and real whites. The subtlety of the image as adjustments are made are a pleasure to see. One thing that did give me pause is with a current project and green toned images. I always work in RGB for preparing an image. But I discovered the sRGB look to the green, because of the smaller color space, was faded and off from the RGB look. So much so that I had to contact Bay Photo before I turned the material into a photo book. It turns out they want the images with the sRGB profile. At the same time I learned they do not use the Indigo Printers for the books. They are actually two-sided inkjet prints. I am still thinking about how to deal with the green variation before going to print. At least this monitor will allow me to get the image color tone to where I need them.
     
  8. But I discovered the sRGB look to the green, because of the smaller color space, was faded and off from the RGB look. So much so that I had to contact Bay Photo before I turned the material into a photo book. It turns out they want the images with the sRGB profile.​
    Yes, bogus workflow. See: http://www.photo.net/digital-darkroom-forum/00d1fi
    It’s a reason some do prefer to work with a wide gamut display with wide gamut Working Spaces and green is the area of color space where the differences in just Adobe RGB (1998) and sRGB can be significant. With the NEC, you can produce a very good sRGB emulation too.
    At the same time I learned they do not use the Indigo Printers for the books. They are actually two-sided inkjet prints.​
    They are Toner based devices. That said, I’ve worked with all the major On-Demand printers (Nexpress, Xeikon and Indigo) and for image quality, Indigo is the best of the bunch. It does have an odd screening algorithm where if you print neutral’s, you’ll see purity shifting across the page.
     
  9. Matthew: I have a PA242W-BK with the SpectraView II (SVII). When I got it, I noticed that the selected sRGB (#2) that came from the factory didn't look right like anything I saw on my old monitor. NEC technician told me to ignore that selection (#2) and always use the SpectraView selection (#5) after you calibrate the monitor for sRGB with the SVII and NEC software.
     
  10. Hi Allen,
    I will check into this on my computer when I get home. Thanks for the tip about the different sRGB profile. I was not aware of this. Nor that Green was a problem.
    CHEERS...Mathew
     
  11. Anyone still interested in this question or know anymore about these monitors? I'm having my next monster Photoshop machine being built this week and this is the final decision that I have to make. The slight price difference does not bother me. B&H has these within a $100.00 of each other right now. I will be buying their proprietary puck and software for calibration regardless of which one I pick.
    To be honest, the wider color gamut is not what has me salivating because most of my work is done in sRGB. What attracts me to these two monitors is the quality, the hardware calibration, the 16 bit LUT, the accuracy and brightness and color screen uniformity. It IS important that their version of sRGB be right on because as I said, that's how I will be working most of the time.
    I am a freelance image editor but most of it for the web. Having the wider gamut though will be great for the occasional client that prints that way.

    I guess I really can't go wrong with either one but if anyone knows enough about these two monitors to lean one direction or the other, please speak up. I'd LOVE to end all of my decision making as of TODAY so I can finally rest ! This buying of a new system after 7 years on the same set up is mentally EXHAUSTING. I'm still on XP for crying out loud. : -)
     
  12. To be honest, the wider color gamut is not what has me salivating because most of my work is done in sRGB. What attracts me to these two monitors is the quality, the hardware calibration, the 16 bit LUT, the accuracy and brightness and color screen uniformity. It IS important that their version of sRGB be right on because as I said, that's how I will be working most of the time.​
    You can have both. So yes, all the above reasons and more are why such systems are so ideal.
    Do both bundles provide the same Colorimeter? US and European software from NEC was different (I heard that's going to change). That might be a consideration.
     
  13. I'm not sure if I understood your question correctly but they both have their own proprietary Colorimeters and software. I can't find many differences between these two choices. I guess I'll just flip a coin.

    Thanks Andrew
     
  14. I'm not sure if I understood your question correctly but they both have their own proprietary Colorimeters and software.​
    The NEC's use the X-rite i1Display-2 with their branding. Software is proprietary but I prefer the US product.
     
  15. OK, THERE you go. That might be the tipping factor. I actually HAVE the i1 Display-2. It doesn't say x-rite on it anywhere though. PANTONE Gretagmacbeth. Is that the same one you're talking about? If so, I could maybe save some money.
     
  16. It might work but again, depends on the software which depends on the country.
    See: http://www.necdisplay.com/support-and-services/spectra-view-II/Compatibility
    That's for the US software.
     
  17. Thanks Andrew,
    All of this pro monitor stuff may be a moot point without a very specific graphics card.
    Could you weigh in on this thread ?
    http://www.photo.net/digital-darkroom-forum/00d6hz
     
  18. I chose the Nec. Should be here tomorrow.
     

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