Ever get the feelng that you aren't charging enough?

Discussion in 'Business of Photography' started by ellis_vener_photography, Jan 25, 2015.

  1. You aren't alone. Far from it. I do too. While it's easier to blame clients, youare likely your #1 worst enemy when it comes to knowing
    what a reasonable and fair price is.

    http://blog.creativelive.com/how-to-set-rates-that-work/?utm_campaign=not-charging-
    enough&utm_medium=social&utm_source=cjfacebook&utm_content&utm_term
     
  2. You're probably right, because I suck at marketing, anyway. I do think a lot of it has to do with the venue. When we're working out of an art show where the visitors are mostly senior citizens (like us) with limited incomes, we're probably not going to kick the prices up to where they should be. On the other hand, in a gallery, or even a restaurant full of tourists with extra cash in their pockets, it's a whole different ball game...
     
  3. Yes. I actually had a customer tell me I'm not charging enough. lol. Wish I was able to resubmit my estimate.
     
  4. We ARE our own worst enemies. However I notice that demand for photography is relatively inelastic at different levels in different genres/markets.
    The real problem is that we are crawling about in the dark with respect to quoting.
    All markets are different and all clients are different. Tools such as Fotoquote are often cited as a good starting point for pricing. And just like battle plans, they never survive first contact with the enemy/client.
    The fact is that most of us do not deal with reps that sell us to agencies and get "industry standard" rates. We work with clients who are not interested in the quasi union-speak of industry practices. They want their pictures fast, great, and with unlimited use. If you aren't dancing to that tune you will be scratched off the list as they move to the next guy on their Google search.
    Just like wading in strange water you get a feel for pricing in your market over time. Sometimes you get lucky, sometimes you fall in a hole. Most of the time we shuffle along hoping we don't get hurt.
     

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