What are you reading these days?

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by lee_shively, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. It's Friday afternoon. I've caught up with my work for the week,
    I've checked all the PN forums of interest and now I'm bored.
    Thought I'd see what the forum members are reading these days, photo
    bookwise.

    Personally, I recently ordered 4-5 books on Paul Strand's work
    through Amazon. When I went home at lunch today, "Paul Strand:
    Essays on His Life and Work" was in the mailbox. I'm about to start
    it in a few minutes since my office is pretty much deserted this
    afternoon. What are you reading?
     
  2. vogue, ikea catalogue, russian phrase book
     
  3. Just got the brand new Lodima Press "Edward Weston: Life Work." Virtually perfect life-size reproduction of Weston's prints, (overseen by Michael A.Smith).
     
  4. I am re-reading Richard Zakia's Perception & Imaging. This is the best photography book I have ever read, and it doesn't even deal directly or exclusively with photography.
     
  5. National Geographic, "Big Russ and Me," "The Da Vinci Code", Russian Life
     
  6. i read and re-read 'the negative' and 'the print' as far as camera stuff is concerned.

    for fiction, i have been reading haruki murakami: 'wind up bird chronicle', which restored my faith in modern literature, and now 'norwegian wood' and 'wild sheep chase' - i can't recommend him highly enough.

    also finished in the last two months: 'vernon god little', 'the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime', 'geek love' and 'middlesex', all enjoyable.
     
  7. Today? Leica Manuals from the 1930's and 1940's to answer a querry here about an old Leica Exposure meter made by Weston.
     
  8. currently Mark Twain "Life on the Missisippi"

    during breaks View Camera Magazine.
     
  9. kerouac, mostly....and photo books of course...
     
  10. Non-fiction = Japan Unbound
    Fiction = Conspirators
    Photography = Still working my way through Bystanders
    Work = Quality Management and Supply Chain Management with Philip Kotler's new Marketing Management book for fun

    Conni
     
  11. I'm a product of pubic edjamecation so I ain't big on book learnen. Most recent picture book - Susan Meiselas, Carnival Strippers
     
  12. I find that there's only so much one can read about photography. It's not something I feel that can be written about that much. Talking about it though, that's another story!

    Hope you enjoy the da Vinci code, Bob. Even if only 10% of it is factual it will make you think twice. ;-)

    I'm thinking of reading Cecil Beaton's Photobiography again. ATM I'm reading about IP chains in Linux.
     
  13. Photo Book: Photo Nomad by David Douglas Duncan

    Non-fiction: Leica, Witness to a Century

    Political fiction: Clinton's autobiography

    Science Ficton: Leica Lens Compendium by Erwin Puts

    Children's Humor: photonet Leica forum
     
  14. Hitler versus Stalin - the Second World War in the Eastern Front in Photographs - does that count?
     
  15. Ron Chernow's biography of Alexander Hamilton.
     
  16. Beautiful. Yet another thread peed on by our own resident class
    clown, Jay.

    Weren't you banned? Didn't you learn anything? Oops! The
    whole notion of "learning" admits the possibility of growth and
    change, and an internet icon can't allow that, can he?

    Oh yeah, reading material:

    "Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides
     
  17. Just finished two by Bharti Kirchner: "Darjeeling" and "Pastries." Now starting "Uniform Justice" by Donna Leon. And, of course, PN's Leica Forum ...
     
  18. Just borrowed from the local library Richard Whelan's biography of Stieglitz after watching the library's DVD copy of the American Masters program on that fascinating individual. Paul Strand, another interesting character, was part of Stieglitz's coterie of artists and photographers.

    Also poring through a recently-acquired copy of "Bystander."
     
  19. Karim, you read "IP chains in Linux" ? My God, do you suffer from insomnia or something?
    ;)

    I'm about to get me "Da Vinci code". Now, the only problem is time to read it. I have yet to
    finish HCB's bio by Assouline which I started reading... two years ago. Photo magazines
    while eating. Lots of them.
     
  20. I have Eugene Richards' "Americans We" on my dining room table, open to a page at random, evryy few days I move on to another page.


    In what we Canadians delicately call the "washroom" I have a small reading table.On it I have an old issue of Wallpaper magazine, a picture/text book on the Renaissance, and book from 1937 by William Mortensen, a Hollywood portraitist from that era. He's an incredibly intelligent and witty writer, and the portaits and explanations are quite lucid. I got it at a Goodwill store for $.75 last year. I look at one or the other of these about 1/2 hour per day, when "seated".
     
  21. Yesterday: Cannery Row

    Today: Paris to the Moon by Adam Gopnik
     
  22. Talking Photography by Frank van Riper. Also re-studying Gradient Light by Eddie Ephraums.
     
  23. "Lisette Model", National Gallery of Canada. Great book, I would think it might be the best thing published on Model. Got the first copy of the MOMA series on Atget recently and I always have a history book on the go. Recently finished "The Search for Modern China" by Jonathan D. Spence and now wending my way through "The Columbia History of the World".
     
  24. To busy shooting Latinas on digital and HP5+, in between tunc by Lawrence Durell getting to nunquam next month
     
  25. <<Yet another thread peed on by our own resident class clown, Jay.>>

    It's a nice summer night Kevin...why not keep up the family tradition, grab a sixpack of Miller and take the family out for a joyride?
     
  26. Your brother's a lawyer, right Jay? I'll bet your Mom still loves you
    just as much as him, though. I mean it's no shame to be a
    dental technician.
     
  27. "Invitation to a Beheading" by V. Nabokov.
     
  28. Jamie: Is that Lisette Model book still in print? Took a course of hers at the New School--about 40 years ago.
     
  29. <<Your brother's a lawyer, right Jay? I'll bet your Mom still loves you just as much as him, though. I mean it's no shame to be a dental technician.>>

    That's true, and I respect them highly. But I already posted a scan of my dental license, so you've just made a fool of yourself...again.
     
  30. Literature-Ham on Rye,Charles Bukowski.
    Photography-Architecture Black and White Photography,Terry Hope.
    "Washroom"-Leica Fotographie International May 2004
     
  31. r s

    r s

    The book that was lying closest to me here on the couch was "Identifying Leica lenses" by Sartorius, right under it was the latest copy of "San Francisco Magazine".
     
  32. Kevin M,

    Lighten up, for god's sake. The first two books Jay mentioned are legitimate and are certainly appropriate to the Leica forum. I think it is wonderful that Duncan is still alive -- as a WW2 marine and a Korean War photog, he has had enough adventures for several lifetimes - he is one of my heroes. The other selections were made with a light and witty touch. We all have a tendency to overreact here.
     
  33. Just completed the collection, now I have all of the Phaidon 55 books.
     
  34. Um, this IS light. Stick around for the fireworks.
     
  35. House of Bush, House of Saud by Craig Unger

    Ben Hogan (An American Life) by James Dodson

    Baghdad Express: A Gulf War Memoir by Joel Turnipseed

    Bush Must Go: The Top Ten Reasons Why George Bush Doesn't Deserve a Second Term by Bill Press

    The Price of Loyalty: George W. Bush, the White House, and the Education of Paul O'Neill by Ron Suskind
     
  36. Arrivals and Departures - Garry Winogrand

    White Casket - Miwa Yanagi
     
  37. Re-reading "Letters from Deadman's Cay" by Nina Berkhout. I had given her a Rollei TLR E2 for this adventure, turned out very nice. And then I look at John Turnley's Fine Art Prints on his website. Great stuff, somewhat romantic.
     
  38. m_.

    m_.

    rereading Mario Vegas Llosa's Green House.
     
  39. m_.

    m_.

    The Green House, that is.
     
  40. Photo-related nonfiction: Armed with Cameras: The American Military Photographers of World War II, by Peter Maslowski.

    Other nonfiction: Seeing in the Dark: How Amateur Astronomers Are Discovering the Wonders of the Universe, by Timothy Ferris

    Through the Grand Canyon from Wyoming to Mexico, by Ellsworth Kolb.


    Political nonfiction: Democracy in America, by de Tocqueville (re-reading for first time since college)

    Fiction: The Godfather, by Mario Puzzo (for second time)
     
  41. "Jamie: Is that Lisette Model book still in print?"

    Bill, I just had a look over at abebooks.com and see a clean copy is selling for 75.00USD and up, so, no I guess it's not in print. The book is actually a catalogue for a Model show that toured in the early 90's. Highly recommended, about 100 pages of photos and text, then another 100 pages of photos only. Model sounds like quite a character, what was the class like?
     
  42. I have jsut finished up:
    The Poisonwood Bible by Barbary Kingsolver
    DTVI - Song of Sussanah by Stephen King (hardcore SK fan since I was 12)
    I am currently reading:
    History Lessons: How Textbooks from Around the World Portray U.S. History by Dana Lindaman & Kyle Ward
    Next on my list is:
    Good Omens by Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett
     
  43. Oh, and I read NG, Real Simple, Budget Living, Budget Travel, & LensWork<p>
    I also sit in Barnes & Noble & read books on local stuff while enjoying a cuppa joe. Lately I have been jotting notes from the Photoshop CS Bible & Real World Photoshop CS. Barnes & Noble's air conditioning is better than mine :)
     
  44. After reading for eight hours a day, five days a week at work, I'm lucky to get through the weekly Amateur Photographer and maybe a Carl Hiassen novel. Can't believe our Florida members haven't appeared in them yet. Or have they?
    Trying to get through Marc Reisner's "Cadillac Desert" again
     
    • Ralph Gibson: Overtones
    • Jorg Eikmann * Ulrich Vogt: Kameras fur Millionene
    • On The Other Side of the Mountains, Zhou Qu Fei, written in 1178 AD.
    • Li Qin Zhao : Complete Collection of Poems
    • Peter Lynch: Beating the Street
     
  45. Book of common prayer
     
  46. Read Camus' The Outsider last week. I'm in the middle of Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man right now, though I took a break from it to read Steinbeck's Tortilla Flat on my visa run to Japan a couple of days ago.
     
  47. Olivier, IP chains is actually quite simple (and fun!) as long as you aren't writing hundreds of lines for hundreds of networked computers. We're going to change back our gateway from IP tables as IP chains is actually more suitable (due to session time-outs and crap like that). I might even look into IPFW for Solaris just for a kick. ;-)

    Heather, nice going! I mean, they're just inviting you to exploit the system! :)

    Martin, you might appreciate that I read some of Chuang-Tzu's writing recently. What he wrote is amazing, and he put into words ideas which I haven't been able to express and refine properly. Recommended for all!

    Trevor, interesting, though apart from the Bible itself I know very little about church-specific literature save for the 39 articles. I guess the Prayer Book is mainly instructions for clergy on what to do and when?
     
  48. The last book I read was Dude Where Is My Country by Michael Moore. Now I am near the
    end of The River at the Center of the World by Simon Winchester (highly recommended!).
    On the plane tomorrow I'll be flipping through the Lonely Planet guide to Tokyo.
     
  49. like one commenter indicated above, after reading for my job (almost) 8 hours a day, reading at home is actually a chore.

    That said, I cant seem to stop picking up Robert Frank's, "The Americans"..........and not just for the images. That whole idea of travelling the country, long term, with a cam is starting to fascinate me.
     
  50. Great thread! Can you imagine what Carl Hiassen would do with our Florida members?!!! We need more blue-tongued voles. Jamie: As I recollect--this was 40 years ago!--Model's class was pretty straightforward: get out and shoot, come back and we'll talk. I'd like to think some of it stuck. I took another course with Joe Breitenbach, a German photographer on the staff of Life. The New School was--is--a treasure. Raymond: Thanks for the reminder about Simon Winchester--I love his work.
     
  51. Charles Fayette Taylor - The Internal Combustion Engine in Theory and Practice, Vol. 1 and 2
    Graham Robson - Cosworth
    Don DeLillo - Americana
    David Foster Wallace - Infinite Jest
    Douglas R. Hofstadter - G�del, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid
    Anton Szandor Lavey - Satanic Bible
     
  52. Burgundy--R.Gibson
     
  53. I see that a large portion of the repliers missed the "photo bookwise" part of Lee's question.
     
  54. EUROPEAN LITERATURE IN THE LATIN MIDDLE AGES, ERNST ROBERT CURTIUS
     
  55. FWIW, Photo book = Germaine Krull, Avantgarde als Ebenteuer (available at
    a bargain price from the Serpentine Gallery in London right now)<p> Just
    bought a friend Photo Nomad, great photos, shame about the typos, and the
    text running over the photos. <p>
    Non-fiction = Rembrandt by Simon Scharma, and Gibbon's Decline and Fall
    Of The Roman Empire and about to start Colossus by Niall ferguson. Recently
    finished Atomised and Mystery Of the Black Dog.... Currently reading and
    enjoying seeing Jay's posts antagonise people, whether or not he has a
    certificate.
     
  56. I see that a large portion of the repliers missed the "photo bookwise" part of Lee's question
    Ah well, if you are going to be that pedantic, then who in the hell reads a book full of photographs?...
    :?)
     
  57. George, Invitation to a Beheading is probably my favorite novel of all time. Are you
    enjoying it?? Nabokov is a master of absurdity, not to mention the English language...I am
    trying to make my way through the original Russian version right now, but as a second
    language, I get a bit less of the beauty and nuance of the language than I do in his English
    version.
    <P>
    Anyway: Photo book: Ansel Adams, the Negative. My first time through the series. It is
    excellent.
    <P>
    Non-photo book: One Hundred Years of Solitude, by Marquez <P>
    Academic works: A bunch on Shinto, Buddhist and Christian relations in Meiji Japan.
     
  58. Ian wrote:

    for fiction, i have been reading haruki murakami: 'wind up bird chronicle', which restored
    my faith in modern literature, and now 'norwegian wood' and 'wild sheep chase' - i can't
    recommend him highly enough.


    Haruki Murakami is AWESOME. You've read some good ones. Try Hardboiled Wonderland
    and the End of the World next. ;-)

    Not all Murakami is surreal, but if you're in that mood after you've finished all his stuff,
    also try
    Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges, The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro, The Trial by Franz
    Kafka, and The Bridegroom was a Dog by Yoko Tawada.

    And to answer the question Lee asked, I'm currently reading a two-volume Congressional
    Quarterly thing about Watergate. ;-)
     
  59. Jay,

    If the "Leica: Witness to a Century" book you refer to is the recent one by Alessandro
    Pasi, I would be grateful if you could tell me about the reproduction values of that
    book. For example, I happen to know it contains a colour photo of two men (father
    and son?) in conversation at a caf頴able, with light streaming down from above. How
    large is this photograph in the book, and how good is the print quality? I am thinking
    of buying this book, but would like to know how good the photos are before doing
    so.
     
  60. Karim, I appreciate your effort in explaining but, as you probably suspected, I couldn't
    finish
    reading the three lines because I fell asleep before and my head violently hurt my desk.
    Thanks anyway ;)
     
  61. Gary, if you havn't already read it another powerful book on that conflict is Stalingrad the Faithful Siege. It is mostly text, but there is some amazing photographs in it as well. Its by Antony Bevor.
     
  62. >Ian wrote:

    >for fiction, i have been reading haruki murakami: 'wind up bird chronicle', which
    restored my faith in modern literature, and now 'norwegian wood' and 'wild sheep
    chase' - i can't recommend him highly enough.

    >Haruki Murakami is AWESOME. You've read some good ones. Try Hardboiled
    Wonderland and the End of the World next. ;-)

    >Not all Murakami is surreal, but if you're in that mood after you've finished all his
    stuff, also try Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges, The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro, The
    Trial by Franz Kafka, and The Bridegroom was a Dog by Yoko Tawada.

    Yeah, Murakami is on my list next. "Labyrinths" is very good--but go for the gold and
    pick up Borges' "Collected Fictions".

    Just finished Orwell's "1984". Very appropriate for this day and age. Also reading
    Naomi Kline's "No Logo". Sick, very sick.

    Two weeks ago it was "The Corporation". There is a documentary out on it by the
    same filmaker that did "Manufacturing Consent".

    Hmmm, I need some fiction...
     
  63. Jon wrote: "Hmmm, I need some fiction..."

    If you haven't read Jurassic Park yet, I seriously recommend it. It is not a crappy throw-away excuse for a movie deal. It is much much more absorbing than the film which is based on it.

    Disclosure is also a good read, but a bit lighter.

    Olivier, just for you:

    ipchains -A input -s 127.0.0.1 -p icmp -j DENY

    :)
     
  64. "Frontier Justice: weapons of mass destruction and the bushwhacking of America" by Scott Ritter
     
  65. Rabiger's extraordinary books on directing, not much else at the moment. I spend more time watching and rewatching films than reading these days. Another type of reading.
     
  66. Norwegian wood - does the book have any connection with theNorwegian Woord festival? Or is the other way around - that the festival is named after the book?
     
  67. Never mind - I've got it...it's from a Beatles song....well, the Beatles never was my thing really.....(and not the festival either).
     

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