Wednesday Landscapes, 8 August 2018

Discussion in 'Landscape' started by Leslie Reid, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. You are invited to upload one or more of your landscape photos and, if you’d like, to accompany your image with some commentary: challenges you faced in making the image? your intent for the image? settings? post-processing decisions? why you did what you did? the place and time? or an aspect you’d like feedback on? And please feel free to ask questions of others who have posted images or to join the discussion. If you don’t feel like using words, that’s OK too—unaccompanied images (or unaccompanied words, for that matter) are also very much welcomed. As for the technicalities, the usual forum guidelines apply: files < 1 MB; image size <1000 px maximum dimension.

    This one has been bouncing back and forth between color and black and white for quite awhile now, and it finally landed on color—I liked the little tinges of color that enliven the brights, and I was finally persuaded by the way the yellow-greens anchor the lower right corner and get picked up slightly by the trees. I think the weak point of the image is how the pampas grass trails off the frame to the left. I spent some time trying to figure out how to frame the shot most gracefully, and didn't come up with any good solutions--this patch just got messier and messier off to the left.

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  2. [QUOTE="Leslie Reid, post: 5685782,......

    .... finally landed on color—I liked the little tinges of color that enliven the brights, and I was finally persuaded by the way the yellow-greens anchor the lower right corner and get picked up slightly by the trees. I think the weak point of the image is how the pampas grass trails off the frame to the left. I spent some time trying to figure out how to frame the shot most gracefully, and didn't come up with any good solutions--this patch just got messier and messier off to the left.

    Nice; largely the result of good choices. The colour and tonality are !
    As far as I'm concerned, the pampas grass enters from the left, leading us in and the subtler angle shadows lift us up.
     
    Leslie Reid and michaellinder like this.
  3. When it comes to shooting waterfalls, I usually don't follow the common trend to use long or ultralong shutter speeds to blur the living daylights out of the water so that it appears like foam, milk (or worse: shaving cream) but also try to avoid too short speeds that freeze the water movement totally. I aim to replicate the way it looks when viewed with the naked eye which usually means I have to try several shutter speeds that can range from 1/8s to 1/250s - the latter of which appeared to do the trick here.
    [​IMG]
    I most likely would have taken artistic liberty and clone some of the darker in-focus portions over the lighter pampas grass to create a small disconnect where the patch connects to the border of the frame; not much, just so that there's a small dark strip isolating the lit portion of the grass patch.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  4. Ray House

    Ray House Ray House

  5. Dieter, Amen.
     
  6. I think the weak point of the image is how the pampas grass trails off the frame to the left. I spent some time trying to figure out how to frame the shot most gracefully, and didn't come up with any good solutions--this patch just got messier and messier off to the left.

    I don't see the pampas grass on the left as a weak point. It opens up the right part of the photo for exploration. --Sally
     
  7. I chose an image that emphasizes a calm atmosphere, as I believe Leslie's does. fullsizeoutput_3193copy_edited-1.jpg
     
  8. Leslie and Dieter I love both images and I learn so much from your comments. What I like most about both images is how the subject is so easy to pick out. Something I am working on. This image is a vista in the Smoky Mountains National park and I tried to make the subject the fire damage from a few years ago.

    View attachment VistaSMG072018_1.jpg
     
    Glenn McCreery and Leslie Reid like this.
  9. teton river polar panorama 1 s.jpg
    In this weeks "Weekly Post Processing Challenge", Gerald Cafferty presents a "little planet" (polar) interpretation of his challenge photo and a link to the method used. I decided to try the method on a panoramic landscape image. Since I do not have any 360 degree panoramas to play with, matching the boundary edges proved to be difficult and required a bunch of cloning on the image chosen, a panoramic view of the Teton River and Teton Mountain Range in winter.
     
  10. For reference, here is the initial unmodified panorama. teton river panorama 1 1 s.jpg
     
  11. Wayne.....I love it.
     
  12. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Moderator Staff Member

    Glenn - An amazing, interesting effort (which I could in no way replicate!) Looking at this in comparison with the "little planet" suggests that there may be a type of feature set in the original image that makes this approach particularly effective. Something for me to think about. Thanks!
     
  13. Thanks Sandy - Having the horizon centered vertically helps. The height of the mountains on the right and left are similar, which also helps with alignment. I needed to clone parts of the clouds on the left to right side of the panorama and flip the cloned clouds horizontally to match up with the left side clouds at the junction. Then it took more cloning, plus dodging and burning, to make the junction look smooth. Like I said, making a 360 degree panorama with a level tripod head would have made thing much simpler. The actual technique of making a "little planet" is quite simple if you follow the link in Gerald Cafferty's post.
     
  14. Marvelous image, Mike!
     
  15. Burnt Over
    WY-Yellowstone-150512-027-burnt.jpg
    Yellowstone Spring 2015​
     
  16. JDM - Your photo reminds me of visiting Yellowstone soon after the 1988 fires. Driving was hazardous, especially when windy, because of burned trees falling across the road.
     
  17. Been photographing Monument Valley for many years. October, 1990, Rolleiflex 3.5F, Velvia, Epson 4990, Vuescan.

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  18. Morada, Penitente Brotherhood, Abiquiu, New Mexico, 2001. Canham DLC, 90mm Schneider f/8 Super Angulon, Velvia, CPL.

    I've been documenting small village churches (and other religious sites) throughout northern New Mexico for many years. I always try to photograph the sites to include as much of their natural surroundings as possible, so I hope this qualifies as a landscape.

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