Solidifying Gitzo G0011 head

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by tropdude, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. Gitzo G0011 table tripod:
    Any trick to make sure the head (D0011.11) does NOT move at all and feels as a one, single rock-solid piece with the rest of the tripod?
    The small movement that is very annoying comes from the fact that the center column's two screw-rings (DB453 and DB455) and top screw (D01.110) can not be tightened to perfection by hand, so if loading with a heavy camera, the center column will rotate - a fraction of a degree, but that is destructive enough - clockwise or counterclockwise. This is despite that there is a small peg sticking out on the top of the tripod that fits to the socket on the bottom of D0011.11 meant to prevent this exact rotation. Since the socket is too big for the peg, the head will feel and act loose.
    I am looking for ways, preferably not by welding permanently, to eliminate this movement. (I used to put gaffer tape onto the socket thus making it tighter and force the peg into it, a temporary solution.)
    https://www.manfrottospares.com/download/pdfs/G0011.pdf
    http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTYwMFg5NTA=/z/eKEAAOxy3NBSnAEL/$_21.JPG?set_id=880000500F
     
  2. If the tripod is reasonably level there is no turning force between the head and column, regardless of the weight or position of the camera.
    I have several Gitzo tripods, none of which are keyed to the head. A single screw and platform suffice.


    Gitzo ball heads are a different matter. None of the lock tightly enough to hold an heavy camera at a steep angle, and the cameras rotate
    on their attaching screw.


    The solution is a better head with an Arca type QR system. An RRS BH-25 is a suggestion for a table top or extremely light tripod.
     
  3. It's not entirely clear what is rotating, but it appears from the illustrations I've looked at that there is a peg on the top of the tripod legs, which is supposed to engage a hole in the column flange when the column is all the way down, and that this peg is smaller than the hole. And thus that the entire column is rotating slightly in the legs. Is this correct?
    Various possibilities arise here, but most that involve making a pin that's a tighter fit also make it harder to pull apart again. If you intend never to remove it again, an alternative to welding might be to turn the rig upside down pour a little epoxy glue into the hole, and put it together to dry.
    If you can drill through the pin, a common way to snug up gib screws and the like in machine tools might work: find some nylon trimmer line of a suitable diameter, and a drill bit that is just a gnat's hair smaller. Cross drill the pin, and then pull through some line. You can file or trim it to a taper if you need to start it in the hole. Cut the line off so that it is just a tiny bit proud of the diameter of the pin, and when you insert it in the flange hole, it should be nice and snug, but still not too hard to pull out. You can make the plastic protrude more or less as needed, and replace it if it wears.
    I'd also investigate whether the threads on the locking collars can be limbered up, perhaps with very sparing lubrication, so that they are easier to lock. And if you're going to leave it in one position (as you would have to if you welded it) try tightening the collars with water pump (AKA Channellock) pliers first.
     
  4. Correct!
    "...it appears from the illustrations I've looked at that there is a peg on the top of the tripod legs, which is supposed to engage a hole in the column flange when the column is all the way down, and that this peg is smaller than the hole. And thus that the entire column is rotating slightly in the legs. Is this correct?"
    Thank you for your take on the possible solutions!
     
  5. Fitting a pin that is the same size as the hole without play, an H0 fitting, will make it just about impossible to use that pin and hole. Gitzo provided another way to make sure things are so tight that you need tools to get things moving again: the locking collar.<br>By the way: if you want to "solidify" the tripod, using a tripod a bit more solid than this table top thing will help. ;-)
     
  6. I have a Gitzo 026 which also has a pin and matching hole in the bottom of the plate.
    I have never had the issue you mention primarily because even if there is a fraction of a degree of play I never apply sufficient torque between shots to cause rotation to occur. Even if at an angle for the weight of camera and lens to create sufficienct torque, once the small rotation occurs it becomes stable in that direction.
    That said I just played around with the tripod for a few minutes and a temporary fix is to put a small ball of aluminum foil in the hole and then push the pin into it. It took all of about 20 seconds. Too much foil and the pin won't fit, too little and the play remains. Replace as needed. You'll need to experiment.
     
  7. "Even if at an angle for the weight of camera and lens to create sufficienct torque, once the small rotation occurs it becomes stable in that direction."

    I use heavy Nikon Ds, big lenses, 1-3 h time-lapse exposure, so it must be rock solid. (Yes, I know it was not designed for that, but this is one of the few options for select extreme travels.)
    Alufoil is a VERY smart suggestion! Easy to carry, replace, adjust, etc. Will try.
     
  8. ZT:
    Let me know if you're still interested in a few dollars solution purchased from B&H. You can also email me at fotonut_65@yahoo.com.

    Ken
     

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