Photo lab with decent scan?

Discussion in 'Film and Processing' started by _yvind_f., Aug 26, 2014.

  1. I'm tried a couple of the big comercial companies and they only seem to develop and scan "standard" 1024x786 small .jpg's.

    Do you guys know of a company that scans bigger, or does this cost your left arm + kidney?
     
  2. The Darkroom in California does pretty well - I don't remember the pixel dimensions, but the enhanced scans are quite nice. Costs an additional $5. Their website explains all their scanning options (I think thay have a level above enhanced).
     
  3. That looks sweet mate, thanks!
     
  4. http://www.saugus.net/Photos/scanning.shtml
    http://www.yelp.com/biz/dijifi-brooklyn
     
  5. Try North Coast Photo in Carlsbad CA.
     
  6. Livingston Camera in Livingston, NJ does excellent High Resolution scans. When I get back from my vacation I will be getting some.
     
  7. Jeff: That can't be the old Livingston Camera that I went to when I was growing up there? They fixed my Dad's Leica when I didn't know about three-ply threads. :)
     
  8. Referenced is a sample of The Darkroom scans at their best resolution. They deliver in .jpg. I think .Tif would have been better. Then when Flickr posts, the file goes through the jpeg process again. The scan you get from The Darkroom is better than what you see on Flickr by a little bit.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/94056000@N06/14360837313/sizes/o/
    I quote the poster:
    The Scanner is a Noritsu fitted to a QSS-32_33 processor/printer:
    This scanner is rated at 4600 PPI and in fact has that many sensors in the array. However, due to software or the lens (I suspect the lens) there is only about 3000 PPI worth of information in the scan in .jpg form. Some of the flatbed scanners have the same problem with lenses and are infamous for not resolving the potential of the sensor count. Most under $2000.00 flatbed scanners only give 40% to 60% of their rating. I would have thought Noritsu would do a better job. I’ve found that in order to scan over 4000 true PPI which the Nikons would approach (except for the out-of-production Minolta 5400 II), one has to get a true drum scan and with a talented operator to boot.
    Moderator: Yes, I have the permission from A. T. Burke to quote and reference his work.
     
  9. The two I use:
    - North Coast Photographic Services
    - Precision Photo in Austin TX.
    These two outfits use the same equipment and produce really good high resolution jpeg files. With a lot of effort I can do a little better with my Coolscan, but these are darn good.
     
  10. Most times if you get scans with your film process and print, the scan sizes will be the size to make the prints. So, e.g., for 4x6 inch prints, the scans are often about 1218x1827 pixels.
    Last couple of times I had a whole roll of 35mm film scanned (which was with processing and printing), I used Lakeside Camera in the New Orleans area. They appear to offer an option of 2000x3000 pixel scans.
    http://lakesidecamera.com/index.php/services/C45
     
  11. I've had good scans from Dwayne's in Kansas. They provide approx. 8 MP scans, but I can't remember the numbers, having sent them off.
     
  12. Try Northcoast Photographic.
    http://northcoastphoto.com/film_developing_scans.html
    I have not used them since I do my own scanning, but heard good things about them. They offer "Budget Scans" and "Enhanced Scans"
    Good luck.
     
  13. I noticed that both Darkroom Lab and North Coast Lab offers film processing and high resolution scanning.
    Has anyone had any issues mailing film to them for processing in the Hot Summer months and also the warmer environment of transporting there? I saw a mention of using USPS Priority Mail, just not sure if the heat in the truck will "cook" the film..
    I will be mailing from the East Coast to the West Coast.
    I was notify by my local lab that they will be discontinuing C-41 film processing. E-6 has been discontinued and shipped out to a 3rd Party that they will reveal. It took me 10-15 days before my film was return to me...
    Evan
     

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