From my Watch collection

Discussion in 'Macro' started by Scarecrow Joe, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. [​IMG]269A8068 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A8547 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A8580-Edit by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A8593 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A8748 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A8885 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A9134 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A9244 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A9272 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A9349 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A9379 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A1413 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A1701 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A1753 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A2790 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A2956 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A3132 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A3392 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A3414-Edit by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    [​IMG]269A3432 by Oscar Baez Soria, on Flickr

    Hope you like. For more watch images check out my Flickr:
    Watch Collection
     
  2. Good pictures, but the only one of the watches that I'd ever want to be see wearing is the Tissot 1853.
     
  3. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Administrator Staff Member

    That it is what the thread is about.
     
  4. Watches can certainly make a fun macro subject. I photograph them a lot, both for cataloging my collection and for the challenge.

    Here's what I'd call a standard "catalog" shot. This was shot with 3 strobes-two overhead with shoot-through umbrellas, and one at lower power to the left about even with the table with a beauty dish. The "even left" trick was told to me by a collector friend who's also a professional photographer, and it can help "catch" details that otherwise flat lighting can hide. He initially suggested a beauty dish, which I didn't have at the time, but experimented a lot with different sized reflectors, snoots, barn doors, and even bare bulb(Norman heads). When I finally got a beauty dish, I had to agree with him that the difference was subtle but nice and worth it.

    I used a 105mm Micro handheld for this-something that my friend suggested and that I found actually works quite well.

    _DSC3285-1.jpg

    _DSC3285-1.jpg

    Here's more of an extreme macro-this is a non-magnetic balance wheel on an 1883. I don't remember the strobe configuration, but do know that I had the camera on a tripod with bellows and used a 55mm f/3.5 Micro. IIRC, this worked out to about 6x life size.

    balance wheel-lr.jpg

    _DSC3282-1.jpg
     
    bgelfand and charles_escott_new like this.
  5. These photos are always fun to take also.

    This one was made with a fairly primitive lighting set-up of two CFLs in clamp lights with paper over the reflectors and a large piece of poster board to act as something of a light tent. I definitely prefer the flexibility of strobes!

    This one was made from a tripod, of course, since the exposure time was quite long.

    [​IMG]
     
    ken_kuzenski likes this.
  6. To the OP:

    A little technical data would be nice. What lens, what camera, etc.

    Nice pictures.
     
  7. Thanks!

    For some of this I used natural light, carefully controlling for undesirable highlights. For others I used a portable studio with a self contained light source. I got it from amazon. I went with natural wood textures as a base for most of these which provided a rich, warm type of light and tones. I dont like that standard "catalog" style of images for these. They have character and deserve a bit of creativity, I try to make "portraits" out of them. The catalog look looks bland and boring, IMO. I prefer that type of light in contrast to a cold, sterile and flat look what some seem to prefer.

    As far as equipment I used:

    Canon 5d Mark IV camera
    Canon 100mm f/2.8 L Macro lens
    Lightroom (software)
    Photoshop (software)

    Again, thanks for looking and for the likes!
     
  8. Thank you very much for the information, Joe.
     
  9. Yeah, I guess I was out of line there. Thanks for reminding me.
     
  10. I did a bunch of watches a while ago, and of course now I can't find any. But i played a little tonight with a couple of different macro setups.

    Here's one with a "Compugraphic" typesetting lens, about 2:1, in a microscope adapter on a D7100:

    compugraphic 2x watch.jpg
     
    bgelfand likes this.
  11. One of the nice things about macros is that even cheap watches look kind of nice. You don't necessarily want stamped gears and rough milling in your pet timepiece, but for a picture...This with a 55 mm macro lens on a long extension.

    55 on 68 watch.jpg
     
  12. I've been having fun with different macro setups. Too many variations to show here, but here's a 50/F2AI reversed, and mounted on two K extension sets for a total of about 96 mm. The advantage of this setup is that one can stop down the lens and gain some depth of field, which is sorely lacking in the compugraphics.

    50 reversed and extended.jpg
     
    bgelfand and Sandy Vongries like this.
  13. For me, I just love mechanical devices. One of the reasons I collect old film cameras. I also like armored vehicles, so it's not purely a matter of scale. Nice watches and great shots of them.

    Imagine the ingenuity of the makers of these things.

    Berlin--T-34.jpg
    Old boy and his tank
     

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