Film Camera Week for July 17

Discussion in 'Classic Manual Cameras' started by Mike Gammill, Jul 16, 2020.

  1. Greetings all and welcome to our new thread. Post all the images you like from any film camera. I'll start with a few from a roll of Eastman 5222 (aka Double X) that I shot in my Minolta Hi Matic 7S.
    upload_2020-7-16_4-49-47.jpeg
    From balcony (where I run sound board) of my church. We're now allowing limited attendance, but still on the radio and Facebook live.
    The Hi Matic works well with a Wein cell and I usually leave it to choose exposure via programmed automation.
    upload_2020-7-16_4-52-28.jpeg
    one of several BBQ places in West Point
    upload_2020-7-16_4-53-29.jpeg
    exterior work to another local church. The 45mm f 1.7 delivers sharp results, even when cropped a little as in this photo.
    This, btw, is my last roll of Eastman 5222 for now. It has gotten too pricey for me. The Ilford films I use are less expensive. I miss the days when I could get 5222 for 5 cents a foot. (short ends) That would make a 100' roll cost five dollars.
    upload_2020-7-16_4-58-52.jpeg
    overcast morning on Main Street
    One more
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    signs and support structures
    The Hi Matic claims to have CLC metering, but I'm not sure how that's done with only a single CDS cell. I plan to make a few tests with the next roll I run through this camera.
    I look forward to seeing everyone's photos.
     
  2. Ogle Cabin, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA, 1991. Silver Print Copied with a Nikon D800. Zone VI view camera, Schneider 120mm Super Angulon lens. 2020 D 2 3326a.jpg
     
  3. Ogle Cabin, GSMNP, 1991, Silver Print. Zone VI 4x5 View Camera, Schneider 210 APO-Symmar lens. 2020 D 2 3329.jpg
     
  4. Crossing Log Cosby Creek, GSMNP, 1991, Silver Print. Zone VI view camera, 120mm lens. 2020 D 2 3332.jpg
     
  5. Cosby Creek, GSMNP, 1991, Silver Print. Zone VI 4x5 view camera, 120mm lens. 2020 D 2 3356.jpg
     
  6. Flume for Grist Mill on Roaring Fork Creek, GSMNP, 1991, Silver Print. Zone VI view camera, 120mm lens. 2020 D 2 3333.jpg
     
  7. [​IMG]

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    Contax I (v4) with 5cm f/2.8 Tessar + 1.5x Yellow filter, Fomapan 100
     
  8. You might find the answer in this Mike ....

    "FYI - CLC stands for "Contrast Light Compensation". This is a proprietary trademark Minolta used for their metering system. What it means is that the Minolta metering circuit was designed to give a little bit of bias toward calling for extra exposure when the reading in different parts of the frame varied widely - i.e. it's like an automatic backlight compensation circuit, but it's inherently simplistic in it's execution."

    Link: what does clc metering mean and what is a cds meter
     
    LMar likes this.
  9. Thanks for the link, kmac. I actually participated in that thread so I did a little more research. A quick, but not completely conclusive test for CLC (which not only could provide some backlighting compensation, but also could lessen effects of bright skies in landscape photos) is to compare meter readings with the camera in both horizontal and vertical positions. Averaging or center weighted meters would show little difference most of the time. I haven't thought about testing the 7S that way, but I plan to. Also, I read that a single CDS cell with proper baffles might mimic the CLC results under some conditions (don't quote this yet as I need to go back and find where I read this statement). I would conclude, based on my limited test photos, that the system seems to be more consistent in dealing with backlighting that one of its competitors, the Konica Auto S2. What I would do with the S2 is switch to manual exposure or use the AE lock. More tests coming soon.
     
  10. m42dave

    m42dave Dave E.

    Two from the Kowa SETR2, Kowa SER 35/2.8, Kodak ProImage 100 film.

    Blossoms 1, Kowa SETR2 Kowa SER 35 2.8.jpg

    Blossoms 1
     
  11. m42dave

    m42dave Dave E.

  12. Yep, I read that Wiki site after I posted, it said this: "The Hi-Matic cameras of the 1960s had a single light cell, but nevertheless bore a CLC badge, and the precise nature of the contrast light compensator is unclear."

    Minolta may have indulged in a bit of false advertising, it's hard to say, but with the 7s having just one cell, the meter may have been adjusted to overexpose slightly. I bought a mint Hi-matic 9 a year ago which I haven't used yet. I'll do some tests with that and check dark shadows for exposure and detail.
     
    Mike Gammill likes this.
  13. a couple of weeks ago on a hot afternoon...(argus c3, tx) ixxx500.jpg
     
  14. m42dave

    m42dave Dave E.

    Nice results from the Argus, Richard. It takes sharp pictures.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2020
  15. From my archive:
    Himatic_00012_Spiegel.jpg
    Minolta Himatic 7S (2013)
     
  16. Himatic_00013_Vrijmarkt.jpg
    Minolta Himatic 7S (2013)
     
  17. A great start to the thread, this week! Despite prevailing gloomy weather I managed to shoot a film with a Minolta Alpha 807si wearing a Minolta AF 35-70mm f/4 lens. The film was Arista EDU Ultra 100 developed in Pyrocat HD.

    Last Light #3

    Last Light #3 copy.jpg

    Seeing Double

    Seeing Double copy.jpg

    Sphere

    Sphere copy.jpg

    Last Light

    Last Light copy.jpg

    Fly

    Fly copy.jpg

    Weave

    Weave copy.jpg















     

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