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aplumpton
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Plaubel Makina 670, 80mm Nikkor, exposure time unrecorded on Konica750 nm film, deep orange filter, f8

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© copying only upon request

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Very dynamic landscape. Clouds make an oval rhythm with the mountains, like some kind of circling, disappearing in the most distant point of the over all mountains.
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Hi Kristina. Thank you for your comment. Cloud systems change so rapidly in the mountains, so I was lucky to be able to spot this one (and be there). It was raining on the right slope, but sunny in the foreground and way down the valley. I was quite happy that a sculptor friend, much better known than myself, wanted to place one of his wood and curved wire sculptures close to this photo in my seasonal art gallery (he rarely comments on anything other artists do, so I was quite happy).
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Thanks, Laura. I am a lone tree contemplating the marvellous and endless mountain valley. The clouds and shower reflect a turbulent mind.
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Raining on the right mountain; quickly changing cloud formation; high contrast (Konica

750nm IR flm), but seems to work best when printed that way (Ilford multigrade paper;

original shot with a Makina 670 camera, tripoded, but exposure unrecorded.

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Speaking of lone trees, the one in the foreground is nicely placed to point the way to the real subject in the background. A very dramatic scene in it's own right, I bet, but greatly enhanced by the IR film coupled with the orange filter. The darker areas appear a bit too dark on my screen but my guess is that they are full of details in a print. Tough to take a different looking photo of such a popular scene but you've managed quite nicely. Being in the right place at the right time to capture the unique atmospherics is a real bonus, icing on the cake if you will. Luck is good! Best, LM.
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Thanks very much, Annabella and Ken. Ken, you have a good point about the detail inthe darker areas of forest trees. It has bothered me too. I may have used a too heavy hand in the darkroom in wanting to boost the sky contrast, sacrificing the darker areas below. I intend to have another go at this one (maybe my 6th to date) by selectively printing the darker trees with a softer grade filter and for less time. The presence of rain in some of those areas and the ability of evergreens to sap up light make it difficult to lighten these areas, but it is certainlty worth another try. Thanks.
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