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A request for some advice


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I normally only use the leica and rangefinder forum. But I have what I think is a 1935/6 super ikonta 530/2 ( a 6 x 9). I've put one roll of very old HP5 thru it. Focussing is very, very stiff - I suspect congealed lubricant in the focussing helicoid. Does anyone have either 1) a link on how to relubricate; or more sensibly, 2) some recommendations on who can repair it. The bellows seem light tight. I'm in Australia. I have bought from certo6 previously, but understand that is no longer the original Jurgen. Any advice greatly appreciated. Regards, Arthur (apiarist1). Here's a shot from it (which I think I posted to the rangefinder forum):

 

ikonta2.jpg.5ada980e3436a347395fb709b454e1f3.jpg

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First up, you could try seeping some lighter fluid into where the focusing mechanism gears are. Just a few drops to start with, then work the focus wheel. Repeat a few times but if it doesn't loosen up, a bit of disassembly will be necessary to expose the gears for cleaning them in situ - it can be disastrous if gears are taken out, or they fall out, and they are not put back in their correct sequence. Persist with the lighter fluid first, I'm sure it will work.
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First up, you could try seeping some lighter fluid into where the focusing mechanism gears are. Just a few drops to start with, then work the focus wheel. Repeat a few times but if it doesn't loosen up, a bit of disassembly will be necessary to expose the gears for cleaning them in situ - it can be disastrous if gears are taken out, or they fall out, and they are not put back in their correct sequence. Persist with the lighter fluid first, I'm sure it will work.

Thanks kmac, much appreciated. Where do I put the lighter fluid in? Regards, Arthur (apiarist1)

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Thanks kmac, much appreciated. Where do I put the lighter fluid in?

 

Look for gaps around the front black cover which is held on by three tiny screws and has the f stop markings on it. Drip some lighter fluid in any gap you see. Also behind the thumb wheel and the join where the swinging arm meets the body. Before you do this, check the tightness of the front lens unit, the grease may have hardened in the thread. You can check for stiffness by rotating the lens cell itself, back and forth ... rather than using the thumb wheel. There should be slight back-lash and you'll get a feel for any stiffness within that back-lash. If it is tight, extend the lens cell out as far as it can go and drip some lighter fluid down into the thread. Use sparingly, as Chuck said, but it does evaporate, so repeating the process may be necessary.

 

Let's know how you go with it, it might yet need a drop of light oil, which is what I used years ago on my 531/2 ... but I had it partially disassembled and that made it easier to free things up. Just lately though, I've been bringing "Parts/Repair" film cameras back to full life just by using lighter fluid, pouring it in anywhere I could see a space for both shutters and self-timers.

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I've had little success with freeing up the focus on the Super Ikontas without at least a partial tear down.

 

You can attempt to get oil/lighter fluid into the focus helicoid with a needle, when you turn the lens to the closest focus distance. put it in the gap between the lens bezel and the front cover of the shutter.

You might get a bit of lubricant/lighter fluid into the smaller gears of the rotating rangefinder prisms by removing the small back cover.

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Look for gaps around the front black cover which is held on by three tiny screws and has the f stop markings on it. Drip some lighter fluid in any gap you see. Also behind the thumb wheel and the join where the swinging arm meets the body. Before you do this, check the tightness of the front lens unit, the grease may have hardened in the thread. You can check for stiffness by rotating the lens cell itself, back and forth ... rather than using the thumb wheel. There should be slight back-lash and you'll get a feel for any stiffness within that back-lash. If it is tight, extend the lens cell out as far as it can go and drip some lighter fluid down into the thread. Use sparingly, as Chuck said, but it does evaporate, so repeating the process may be necessary.

 

Let's know how you go with it, it might yet need a drop of light oil, which is what I used years ago on my 531/2 ... but I had it partially disassembled and that made it easier to free things up. Just lately though, I've been bringing "Parts/Repair" film cameras back to full life just by using lighter fluid, pouring it in anywhere I could see a space for both shutters and self-timers.

 

Yes well, it worked. And thank you. The focussing is now smoother - at least it will not shred skin. I'm wondering how long it will last? And then I did a foolish thing - tried the delayed shutter device - it has seized on me. Locked in. Shutter won't fire. Unless I can think of something, I think I'll have to take it to a technician. And yours was good advice. Thanks kmac. Regards, Arthur (apiarist1)

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I've had little success with freeing up the focus on the Super Ikontas without at least a partial tear down.

 

You can attempt to get oil/lighter fluid into the focus helicoid with a needle, when you turn the lens to the closest focus distance. put it in the gap between the lens bezel and the front cover of the shutter.

You might get a bit of lubricant/lighter fluid into the smaller gears of the rotating rangefinder prisms by removing the small back cover.

 

Thanks Rick. Do you have some advice about a tearing down. The lighter fluid worked for focussing, at least temporarily, but now the shutter is 'locked'. I tried to use the delay button. All I've done is locked up the shutter - won't fire. The push pin that fires the shutter is in half way - won't work. Any advice, greatly appreciated. Regards, Arthur (Apiarist1).

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Sometimes if you've used too much lighter fluid in some parts of the mechanism it will temporarily lock up, particularly if it gets in between the shutter blades. This will generally resolve itself as the fluid evaporates. Otherwise the lighter fluid trick might release any sticking slow shutter speeds and self-timer workings of the shutter, but you have to be careful not to flush dirt onto the inner lens surfaces, so don't use large amounts. Generally a drop fed in with a syringe.

Then exercise the shutter speed dial and cocking lever/release.

 

Advice about tearing down the shutter on a Super Ikonta. If you've not worked on Compur shutters before I would suggest not attempting it in the first place.

Getting inside these cameras has the additional hurdle of having to remove the front cover that sits over the shutter and RF eye. This requires taking off the outer lens bezel (and that generally messes up the RF calibration if you're not careful).

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Sometimes if you've used too much lighter fluid in some parts of the mechanism it will temporarily lock up, particularly if it gets in between the shutter blades. This will generally resolve itself as the fluid evaporates. Otherwise the lighter fluid trick might release any sticking slow shutter speeds and self-timer workings of the shutter, but you have to be careful not to flush dirt onto the inner lens surfaces, so don't use large amounts. Generally a drop fed in with a syringe.

Then exercise the shutter speed dial and cocking lever/release.

 

Advice about tearing down the shutter on a Super Ikonta. If you've not worked on Compur shutters before I would suggest not attempting it in the first place.

Getting inside these cameras has the additional hurdle of having to remove the front cover that sits over the shutter and RF eye. This requires taking off the outer lens bezel (and that generally messes up the RF calibration if you're not careful).

 

Thanks Rick. I think I was foolish to try the self timer. Ahem. Off to someone who knows what they are doing. It is an enjoyable, if slow, camera to use. I'm not conversant with camera repairs, so will leave it to someone who is. At the moment, its shutter is cocked, the shutter lever is stuck half way in, and it won't fire. Ahem. Thanks again for your advice. Regards, Arthur (apiarist1).

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First of all, and although this may sound stupid:

 

- Please note that in most Super Ikontas I am aware of, and thus most probably your 530/2 as well, the self-timer will only work in the range 1sec to 1/200 (not B or faster speed).

- Please remember that your camera is fitted with a double exposure prevention interlock, and the shutter will thus not release unless film is advanced (even if the camera has no film in it, you must turn the advance knob until it stops or anyway for what would be an appropriate length).

 

This said, I assume ypour camera has the same self-timer mechanism as most other Super Ikontas, i.e. you cock it by pushing the shutter cocking lever a litte bit further forward then normal. If so, try this: put a few drops of lighter fluid into the cocking lever slot, and then try to gently push the lever back while at the same time pressing the shutter release button. If you hear the "wirring" sound of the clockwork mechanism, stop all action and see what happens.

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Also, the self timer could be tried again, even with the shutter stuck, just work the two levers and see if the shutter comes unstuck. Those little round self timer handles can break off, so go easy applying pressure when pulling it back, it only needs to be pulled back just enough to allow the cocking lever to travel that extra distance to set the self timer, but you've already done that and it got stuck, so just gently work the two levers again a number of times and see if it remains stuck, or comes free.
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Just to re-emphasize.

Use pure volatile spirit (like naphtha) in a well-ventilated space.

Use really tiny amounts in any one application - never flood the mechanism. The amount on the tip of a needle is about right.

Try to work the mechanism as you apply solvent.

 

Don't use devil's brew de-rust or other such caustic stuff (not WD-40). You want to loosen grease and such not corrode it away....

 

Lord Naptha, melter of white grease.

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MY experience with "delay " or self timers...especially on folders has been pretty good..as you said you tried it.. so you'Ve learned your lesson :)

On a positive note , I have found cocking firing and then gently pushing on the cocking lever in gthe release direction will return a very faint "tick" the kind of tick you hear on slow shutter speeds but when working the ticks are happening so fast, they "whirr" So gently push this to get a tick or two. cocking and firing in between gently pushing and tics will eventually be rewarded with the shuitter finally releasing... or not

I do not think anzthing with lighterfluid will help this... IMHO

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