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Ricoh Diacord


skygzr
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Hi Everyone -

 

I got a Diacord about a year ago, and I have to say it's come to be

my favorite and most usable classic. Maybe I just got a good one,

but the lens is fabulous...sharp and contrasty. All I had to do

when I got it was flush the shutter with some lighter fluid and

clean the screen.

 

You quickly get used to the "two thumbs" method of focusing, and the

other ergonomics seem completely transparent.

 

I briefly had a Diacord L and found it hard to use. The meter still

worked and was fairly accurate in everything but dim light, but the

way it coupled with the shutter and aperture confused me every time

I tried to use it.

 

I have a Yashica-Mat and at one time had an Autocord. I'm sure the

others are fine cameras but to me there's no comparison.

 

Sorry to help drive the price up, Diacord fans! :-)<div>00FQl0-28459984.jpg.7cbe854d93c008e28de00adc9c8c4eb3.jpg</div>

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I've been a fan of the Diacord since it's introduction, yep, i'm that old, and I think it's probably one of the best kept secrets it photography. The Ls meter it frustrating but is unlinked so in no way effects the camers's performance. I gave my complete Diacord kit to a budding college photography student a few years ago and have really missed it. I think it's probably the best value on todays market for an entry level MF.
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Ditto to both you guys. In my opinion the Diacord is every bit as good as some of the more expensive TLRs from the past. Not having the snob appeal of the Rollei brand, nor having the benefit of Yashica's aggressive marketing campaigns means that the Diacords are still sleepers. My G model is my "serious" camera. I would not sell it or trade it for anything.
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Interesting. For 10 years now I've been shooting professionally with TLRs. In the mid-90s I began using my first one (a Rollei MX-EVS) but soon started mixing in models from Minolta, Yashica, Ricoh, the Kalloflex and other Rolleis. The TLR format worked for me because is was portable enough to fit into my motorcycle luggage, yet returned the big, life-size look that made my photography sell.

 

It took buying, trying and comparing four different Ricoh Diacords to find one that was even close to my best shooters. This isn't a rarity; out of all I've found a wider (optical quality) variance in Yashicas, followed by the Ricoh, Minolta and Kalloflex. I've never had one properly functioning Rolleiflex that didn't return stunning images.

 

I love the Diacord and its 'Duo' focusing system. They seem almost as sturdy and well built as the Minolta and can still be found affordably. I also think Ricoh take the prize for outstanding finish quality; even old, abused models seem to have more robust leatherette and highly wear-resistant paint. Very pretty!

 

Optically, if you have a 'good one' Kevin, cherish it. Believe me when I say Yashica and Kalloflex (the 'King Kong' of fixed lens TLRs) made some good ones too. But for me, when it comes to outstanding image quality, the Autocord and Rollei Tessar rule the day.<div>00FR5c-28471084.jpg.33d4e5893319d5aa47f8909b424e509a.jpg</div>

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Diacord prices wont go up, in fact the price of ALL film camera gear is dropping precipitously, except maybe a few special things like rare limited edition Leicas. If I sold my entire collection of cameras, I doubt whether I'd make money on any single item. And I did not overpay for anything.
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Yes there is variability. I had a Diacord but found it not quite as good optically as my Yashicamat. The build quality was indeed very good though. Still, my Yashie is 48 years old and hasn't fallen apart yet. I've also bought a MPP Microcord and the first results look good. I think perhaps these old TLRs are all individuals and it's hard to generalize about models.
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By the way, the picture I posted was a scanned print, not a negative. I tried to keep the color as close as I could get to the original print.

 

The paper is Kodak Polymax in polysulfide toner. I didn't try this combination until AFTER Kodak discontinued it, and sure enough, I really like it. Darn them anyway.

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David F. Stein: "...all else being equal the Ricoh is the only non-Rollei TLR to have an internal baffling equal to the Rolleiflex".

 

Hmm. I have my nose in these things all the time, so this statement piqued my interest. I don't have a Diacord handy (packed at home) but I do have a Rollei MX Type-II and a Kalloflex, so I popped the backs and looked inside.

 

If anything, the Kallo has a *more* sophisticated series of baffles, and they're deeper too. I also have my Autocord CdS III handy, and here David is right; the baffle ridges are both smaller and fewer than the other two pictured.

 

Not meaning to put David on the spot here, he's a great poster and really knowledgeable too. My real point is incredible build and optical quality is spread through the entire range of Japanese TLRs. If you have a good one...use it! Lots of good shooters out there-<div>00FRj8-28486884.jpg.59fc8cf7a3733f31d81c85b0b6acb282.jpg</div>

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