What cameras did Eisenstaedt use ?

Discussion in 'Casual Photo Conversations' started by anthony_brookes|5, Apr 19, 2014.

  1. I understood that his famous picture of the sailor kissing the girl in the white dress was taken with a Rollei
    and that he finished his career using a Leica M. I don't know if these two facts are true; does anyone know ?
     
  2. According to one site, it was a Leica IIIa:
    http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/04/19/For-sale-signed-print-of-Eisenstaedts-Kiss-in-Times-Square-and-Leica
     
  3. Thanks for the link. It was a Rollei fan who gave me the info so perhaps his enthusiasm overcame him. Does anyone know if he used any cameras other than Leica ?
     
  4. It looks like he mostly shot with Leicas. But, if it makes your friend feel any better, this site has one shot of him with a Rolleiflex. It even shows his first, a Kodak folding camera...
     
  5. All of his war coverage was shot with Leicas including his infamous shot of a scowling (at him) Joseph Goebbels. He was one of the early PJ's using 35MM equipment.
    Since he lived till 1995 one has to presume he crossed paths with many Rollei's? I'm sure there are examples or pictures of him with one out there some where? I know he shot 90 covers for LIFE during his almost 40 year career.
    http://life.time.com/history/goebbels-in-geneva-1933-behind-a-classic-alfred-eisenstaedt-photo/#1
     
  6. He was a photographer. He probably used a dozen different cameras, choosing whatever seemed appropriate at the time.
     
  7. I have one book of Eisenstaedt's photos, Aberdeen, which is, you guessed it, a collection of street and documentary photos of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    There's a photo of Eisenstaedt himself in it, with two Leica M cameras around his neck: one white metal, and one black. The notes in the book gush, in fanboy fashion, about how he has the Leica camera with serial number 1000001. (Of course, Eisenstaedt didn't write this.)
     
  8. He probably used a dozen different cameras ...
    I gain the impression from the "Witness To Our Time" book that some of his early work (for example, the "skiing waiter" story) was done on a 9x12 cm press camera with a filmpack back (very likely the "Goertz Anschütz" type.
     

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