Question about shooting continuosly with timer on Nikon D700

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by khiem_le|1, Feb 22, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I am practicing shooting multiple photos to combine at the end and make a HDR photo with my D700. My preference is to shoot about 7 or 9 photos with BKT.
    However, I found out that pressing the shutter release button at every single photo increases the chance of vibration. I usually use the "timer" function to shoot without touching the camera. However, that just shoots a single shot, not continuosly 9 shots.
    Is there any way to make the camera shoots 9 shot continuosly with the BKT setting? Can the D700 do this?
    I understand that there's an alternative option for this is to use the Nikon MC-36 cable release. I've ordered that and still waiting it to arrive. In the meantime, I just wonder if the d700 is capable of doing this.
    Thanks, guys!
    P.S: Below is the photo that I took with my D700 ;). Still practising!
    00YH21-334861584.jpg
     
  2. Cable release MC-30
    [​IMG]
     
  3. The D700 has a built in intervalometer that lets you set up repeating shots like groups of 6 shots every 2 minutes for 20 groups. I don't know if the Bracket settings effect the exposure used on each set of shots.
     
  4. The D700 will shoot all shots at once as specified in bracketing mode if you set the shooting mode to either CL or CH, that is Continuous Low or Continuous High. Just hold the shutter release down until all shots have fired. The CL/CH setting is on the knob on the top left.
     
  5. Thanks, everyone for your answer.
    @Dan: As in my post, I'm ordering a MC-36 cable and still waiting for it to come ;). This gonna help me alot ;)
    @Lorne: Do you know how exactly to use it, i don't have the manual with me here now so a bit confused about this :-s
    @Jeff: Yes you are right, but unless you keep pressing the shutter release button, it won't shoot continuously for, say, 9 photos. If each photo is about 2 or 3 minutes long, then keep pressing it for a long time will sure introduce some vibration.
     
  6. The d700 has a function called "bracketing burst" that may be assigned to a button. See Custom Settings Menu options f5, f6 & f7. When active all the shots in the currently programmed bracketing sequence will be taken after a single press of the shutter release.
    It doesn't specify if the mirror returns after each shot, or remains up (which would be preferrable). I haven't tried it yet to see.
     
  7. When active all the shots in the currently programmed bracketing sequence will be taken after a single press of the shutter release.​
    This is what I want! Can we use this with the "Timer" function? Say set the timer, and when it shoots, it will shoot continuously until the BKT sequence finishes?
    It doesn't specify if the mirror returns after each shot, or remains up (which would be preferrable). I haven't tried it yet to see.​
    I don't quite understand this bit here, why would the mirror remains up be preferable? I think at the end of any shot, the mirror should return to its original position, which is "down". Please correct if I'm wrong.
    Thanks
     
  8. The on-board intervalometer will work with bracketing - just be sure to allow enough time between shots for any long exposures (in other words, don't out-quick the shutter speed with the interval timer). As Jeff said, Cl or Ch shooting will also work. I find the MC-36 very convenient to use as a release or a timer, and IMO it sure beats menu-diving for the intervalometer function.
    In the pic, the bridge seems rather dark for HDRI. You might want to think about getting the 'middle' (i.e. bracketing start) exposure lighter. The darks will usually take care of themselves, and are quite easy to dial in with post if you need to darken them as opposed to having to lighten them. It helps to shoot RAW and have all the in-camera jpg settings as neutral as possible as well, since the LCD review is based on the jpg settings. It also helps to block the viewfinder to keep stray light from affecting the exposure.
    I don't quite understand this bit here, why would the mirror remains up be preferable? I think at the end of any shot, the mirror should return to its original position, which is "down". Please correct if I'm wrong.​
    If shooting a sequence using a tripod, the composition won't change, so the mirror is unnecessary until the sequence is finished. With slower shutter speeds, its slapping up and down can introduce unwanted vibration and affect image sharpness, but I don't think Nikons can keep the mirror up for all the exposures in a bracketing sequence. HTH.
     
  9. Thank you DBCooper for your advise. Now I understand why there is a viewfinder block :)!
    Yea, your explaination abuout the mirror makes sense, therefire it's great if the mirror is up and the sensor just cuts the power itself to finish each exposure. But is it really UP for the whole series or it will just slap down at the end of each photo? Have you ever tested?
    I found the intervalometer is a bit complicated to set up so its great if the bracketing burst works with the Timer.
     
  10. This is what I want! Can we use this with the "Timer" function? Say set the timer, and when it shoots, it will shoot continuously until the BKT sequence finishes?​
    Doubt if it will work with the timer function. The chosen button for bracketing burst must be continuously pressed while the shutter is released. But give it a try.
     
  11. Doubt if it will work with the timer function. The chosen button for bracketing burst must be continuously pressed while the shutter is released. But give it a try.
    Well if the chosen button for BKTburst must be continuosly pressed then it's pretty much the same with using the C-h or C-l function. Let me try & I'll keep you posted :). Cheers bro!
     
  12. Now I understand why there is a viewfinder block :)!​
    It's also useful for any long exposure, like using an ND filter to get silky flowing water or long night shots.
    But is it really UP for the whole series or it will just slap down at the end of each photo? Have you ever tested?​
    I haven't found a way yet to keep the mirror up for anything beyond a single shot. :(
     
  13. Don't remember which menu it is but there's a setting called "Exposure Delay". After the mirror has gone up, there will be a delay before the shutter opens. This gives a chance for vibrations caused by the mirror slap to settle down.
     
  14. ....there's a setting called "Exposure Delay"...​
    Ah... that's what it does, hmm, I've learned one more thing :)
    I have tested the function called "BKT burst" and that does not do what I want. It's just the option that allow us to shoot the whole BKT sequence by pressing down and holding the shutter-release. Yes, we have to keep pressing down until the sequence of BKT is finished :-(.
    However, I found the Interval shooting is kinda interesting and very useful in my case. It's easy to use as well! All I need to do is set an interval, say 5 seconds; then how many intervals and number of photos that I want to be taken at each interval.
    For example: 3 intervals x 3 photos, each interval is 5 seconds apart mean: it will automatically take 3 photos with the pre-set exposure (this works for BKT with multiple exposure setting as well) at the first interval, then it waits for 5 seconds and take another interval then 5 secs and another interval, etc. (I hope I'm making sense here)
    Anyway, it works for me now :). What I need to do is to test if the "Exposure delay" works with this Interval shooting.
    Oh, if possible, would you please share more tips or your valuable experience for the Long exposure/night shooting? I've learnt a lot in this thread! ;)
    Thanks, guys!
     
  15. I went through this whole thing recently and found it easier to buy one of the inexpensive wireless remotes from Vivitar. Just use continuous, and bracket.
     
  16. Save yourself some money over the Nikon release and get a Yong-Nuo or similar Chinese made copy - after all it's only an electrical lead with a couple of switches at the end. At 1/10th the cost of Nikon's overpriced offering it's well worth the saving. I've been using a Y-N cable release for a couple of years now without any problem, as well as a Chinese-made radio release.
    OK, Nikon's article has a slightly better finish and is made of thicker plastic, but as long as you're not going to throw it against a wall or step on it, the Y-N release is perfectly serviceable. (Plus the cheapness of the Y-N release meant that I didn't feel bad about cutting it in half and adding a couple of 3.5mm stereo sockets to extend its range.)
     
  17. The cheap remote releases are extremely unreliable. It's not a question of making just a cable with a couple of wires inside. It needs to be flexible so that turning the cable in your hand imparts no forces on the camera body. You will pack it in the bag in a tight pocket repeatedly probably hundreds of times over its lifetime, and the cables have to withstand this. The Nikon MC-30 does, and the cheap knock-offs don't last more than a couple of times and function reliably (if even then). That's why there is a price difference. It may seem like a simple device but there is a huge quality gap between the products and in this case it translates to a difference to the user.
     
  18. Save yourself some money over the Nikon release and get a Yong-Nuo or similar Chinese made copy - after all it's only an electrical lead with a couple of switches at the end. At 1/10th the cost of Nikon's overpriced offering it's well worth the saving. I've been using a Y-N cable release for a couple of years now without any problem, as well as a Chinese-made radio release.​
    Thanks for the recommendation. Yes, the one that I ordered on ebay was kinda a replica of the MC-36 that looks exactly like the MC-36.
    [​IMG]
    I haven't received it yet, but hope that it will work perfectly as the original.
     
  19. Khiem, are you happy with that release?
    Do you mind sharing its model specs?
    how about using remote flash triggers to do the same job? From some search I found Yongnuo and Meike to have quite well reviewed options for under $40 which can also function as transceivers for off camera flash photography.
    Any thoughts?
     
  20. Khiem, are you happy with that release?
    Do you mind sharing its model specs?
    how about using remote flash triggers to do the same job? From some search I found Yongnuo and Meike to have quite well reviewed options for under $40 which can also function as transceivers for off camera flash photography. (not sure if it's ok to put the product links).
    Any thoughts?
     

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