My new lens doesn't fit my 10D camera?

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by jane_winfer, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. I have a Canon EOS 10D camera, and I have just bought a Canon EFS 55-250mm lens for it (MkII). However, I can't seem to get it to fit my camera, however much I follow the instructions.
    Am I just being ham-fisted, or have I bought a lens which is incompatible with my camera?
     
  2. I am stealing Bob's thunder but he wrote an article about this some time ago. In essence the issue is that the 10D pre-
    dates the EFS lens mount. In order to protect the full frame and APS-H camera mirrors a new mount was made for EFS
    so they could not fit on full frame. Your body does not have this issue but it has the full frame mount. Bob's article
    explains what you can do

    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/tutorials/efs-10d.html
     
  3. Good grief, this looks far too technical for a mere female! ;-)
    Does anyone know which lenses actually WILL fit a 10D? I'm going round in circles trying to find out!
     
  4. Any canon EF lens will fit but the EF-S and EF-M lenses will not. Just writing this statement it sounds like Canon may be
    heading down the Nikon track with complex tables of body / lens combinations and functionality!
     
  5. The closest lenses in price and range will be the 70-300 and 75-300 options
     
  6. Jane, what you need is a lens with the EF designation, not EFS. Some cameras, like the 20D, will mount both types of lens, but not the 10D. If you look at the front of the camera with the lens off, you'll see a red dot monting guide. An EOS camera which mounts EFS lenses will have a white dot guide. Cameras that take both lenses with have both a red and a white guide dot. Hope this helps...
     
  7. Thank you very much to everyone - and how stupid am I for not checking beforehand! :-/
    What I'm actually after is a decent zoom lens (to fit my 10D of course!) for street photography - that won't break the bank, as my funds are fairly limited. Philip mentions the 70-300 and 75-300 - I wonder which would be the best?
     
  8. Some EF-S lenses can be modified to fit and work properly on the 10D, by removing the plastic protruding part at the rear. I do not know if this applies to the 55~250, but since you have the lens it would be worth finding out.
     
  9. Thanks Robin, but I'm not taking the chance (Mrs Butterfingers here!) - I'd rather return it and buy a lens that fits properly! :)
     
  10. [[What I'm actually after is a decent zoom lens (to fit my 10D of course!) for street photography -]]
    I don't know many people that shoot with a telephoto zoom for street photography. It's done, I'm sure, but generally speaking, people tend to gravitate towards wider angle (relative to the telephoto) and larger aperture lenses. Is there a particular reason you're going for the telephoto side of things?
     
  11. Oh dear, I'm showing my lack of knowledge here. I have a friend who's a good street photographer - he zooms in on people from a very long way off, which produces lovely natural images. I asked him how he got such good results, and he said, "A good zoom lens!" - so, here I am!
    Let's be honest here - I thought there were only zoom lenses, not 'telephoto zoom' lenses too! What's the difference? And what should I be looking at for this type of shooting? (Any suggestions gratefully appreciated!)
     
  12. That focal range is on the long side for most, but not all well-kown SP'ers. You have to find your own way through this, dealing with your own energies. Look at a lot of work, and try different things.
     
  13. The 55-250 won't fit on your 10D, but many third-party lenses designed for 'crop sensor' cameras will. Check out whether there is a competing zoom lens made by Sigma or Tamron.
     
  14. [[Let's be honest here - I thought there were only zoom lenses, not 'telephoto zoom' lenses too! What's the difference? And what should I be looking at for this type of shooting? (Any suggestions gratefully appreciated!)]]
    "zoom" describes its functionality whereas "telephoto" describes its (generalized) focal length range.
    If I have a lens that changes focal length from 8mm to 16mm it is a zoom lens, however the focal length range it "zooms" through is not telephoto, but wide-angle.
    Similarly, a lens that zooms from 70mm to 300mm is using focal lengths in the telephoto range, therefore it is a telephoto zoom.
    Zoom just describes a technological function that gives you the ability to change focal length without putting on a different lens.
     
  15. Because of my budget, I think I'll go for the Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens (found a decently-priced one on eBay, that stacks up well against other lenses). My funds are really dictating my choice here, but I think it'll do the job! :)
    Thanks everyone, for helping a poor silly woman through this maze....... ;-)
     
  16. Jane, first of all, please stop saying stuff like this:
    Good grief, this looks far too technical for a mere female! ;-)​
    ... sigh
    OK, if you don't want to modify the lens (and many MALE photographers would be just as squeamish about any lens modification), you can either buy an EF lens, or...
    Just sell your 10D and buy a 20D. The 20D is compatible with EF-S lenses. You'll probably lose about $70 in the bargain, but you'll have a somewhat better camera that can take the less expensive EF-S lenses.
    Oh, and your question about telephoto zooms: "Zoom" just means the lens has a ring to adjust the focal length (or loosely, the magnification). They are loosely categorized as ultrawide angle, wide angle, normal, telephoto, and supertelephoto zooms. Think of a telephoto lens like a pair of binoculars and a supertelephoto like a telescope. Oh, and if a lens isn't a zoom lens, it's a "prime" lens, which means it only has one focal length. An old-fashioned 50mm lens is an example of a normal prime lens (when used on an SLR film camera or a "full frame" digital camera). A 24-105mm lens is an example of a normal zoom lens (when used on an SLR film camera or a "full frame" digital camera). On your camera, which has a smaller sensor, "normal" is more in the neighborhood of 30mm, so an EF-S 18-55mm lens would be a "normal zoom."
     
  17. Because of my budget, I think I'll go for the Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM​
    That's really not a good lens at all -- one of Canon's worst. The lens you already bought is far better. It just needs an EF-S compatible camera.
     
  18. If you feel compelled to keep the 10D and buy EF lenses for it, the 70-300 f/4-5.6 IS USM is quite good optically and is a bargain. It's more expensive, but it's well worth it.
     
  19. Eep! I hadn't thought of turning my 10D in for something better, but perhaps I should? This is going to require some thought, and a lot of knowledge-gathering, hmm.......
     
  20. [[Thanks everyone, for helping a poor silly woman through this maze....... ;-)]]
    It's not silly to be confused by new terminology. It can be quite complicated, especially when you're just starting out, because there is so much information all at once.
    With regards to the 75-300 Mark III lens. Yes, it is inexpensive (I own one from my film days and still use it on occasion with my digital cameras), and I completely understand about being on a budget, but there is one thing about the 55-250mm that is not on the 75-300 that you may find useful, and may change your mind about how you proceed with purchasing equipment.
    The 55-250mm lens has something called Image Stabilization (abbreviated as IS by Canon [and OS, VC, VR, etc. by other manufacturers]). Image Stabilization allows you to reduce the negative effects of your own body movement when shooting. This is most useful in low-light when the camera is forced to pick a shutter speed slower than you may naturally be able to be steady. It is also extremely helpful on telephoto and telephoto zoom lenses because the angle of view (i.e. what you see) is more narrow, and therefore more prone to showing small bits of movement.
    So, and this may sound a little backwards, what if you sold the 10D and bought a used Canon 20D rather than returning the 55-250mm and getting the 75-300mm? With the 20D you can use the 55-250mm and you get quite a good lens for the money with Image Stabilization.
     
  21. I think, sometimes, the derision of the 75-300mm Mark III is a little extreme. It's not like you're shooting through a block of cement. It is a budget lens, no doubt, but you can find compelling images made with it all over the web. The goal should be to balance your budget and your intended output (i.e. prints, web-only, etc) with your expectations.
    If you are simply learning, doing very little printing, and you truly are limited by budget, then buy the 75-300mm lens because you can't take pictures without a lens on the camera.
    However, as I mentioned before, if your budget is a little more loose, and you can fund a bit of it by selling the 10D, I would definitely recommend the 55-250mm over the 75-300mm.
    If, on the other hand, you're looking to produce 20 inch wide prints as soon as possible, well, then you, of course, should look at much better, and more expensive, lenses.
     
  22. Jane, the 20D is 8 MP, rather than 6.3 MP. It's faster, it's compatible with all Canon EF and EF-S lenses, and it will seem lightning fast in comparison to the 10D (e.g. faster to write an image to the CF card). Otherwise it will operate much like the 10D. In all of the xxD family of cameras have the same basic functionality, with features added to the more modern ones. EF-S lenses were developed for the 20D and onwards (30D, 40D, 50D, 60D)
    FAIW, I really like the 40D, but it may be outside of your budget. However, given your situation, an upgrade to a 20D or 30D would seem a reasonable and affordable move.
    Wikipedia always has good info. You might read here for a quick primer on Canon's EOS cameras and lenses:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_eos#EOS_cameras
    Good luck with your new system! I hope it serves you well! :)
     
  23. ^^^ very good advice from Rob about the IS (image stabilization)!
     
  24. Oh, Jane, one other bit of advice:
    Although Canon's EF-S lenses will not fit your 10D, third party lenses made for so-called "crop-frame" cameras like yours (also called APS-C) will fit the 10D. These manufacturers make lenses with a variety of mounts, so you have to be certain to get one with a Canon EF mount. Your choices would include manufacturers such as Sigma, Tokina, Tamron, etc. And to be clear, ANY of these lenses made for a Canon EF mount would fit your camera, regardless of whether they are designed for full frame or crop frame cameras. However, I still think the body upgrade is the magic ticket.
     
  25. I agree with Sarah - Upgrade your body from the 10D to 20D or 30D. It looks like on Craigslist 20D's are in the $225-$275 range and 30D's are in the $300-$350 range.
     
  26. Something else to keep in mind about the 10D is that it takes a second or two to wake up from sleep mode. If you're trying to do street
    photography, that second can be an eternity. Also, by comparison with later cameras, I found the metering in the 10D didn't deal with
    highlights all that well. For those two reasons, when I went from my 10D to a 20D, I thought I'd gone to heaven. For me, the jump in
    functionality between the 10D and the 20D was bigger than I've experienced since, and I'm now using a 5D Mark III.
     
  27. Thank you everyone for being so helpful! Rob, I DO already have a lens actually - a 28-135mm which has served me very well - AND it's an IS, so I know how great they are! :) I've had my trusty old 10D for years, and it's taken me successfully all through my photography exams - but that was a long while ago now.
    This all started out of an idle curiosity to have a crack at some street photography (I'm normally a portraitist), so I'm still wondering whether to burn my boats and undergo a complete camera change, or to just go for a lens. I suppose the outlay would be worth it in the long run, as I'm never going to stop doing photography, however broke I am - it's just that now is a difficult time. Perhaps I'll just do nothing until I've got some more dosh at my disposal (that won't be long, this is just a temporary hiatus......). I could even flog my medium format kit - I love it but doubt whether I'll be doing any film again. :-/
    I reckon I've got a lot of thinking to do.
     
  28. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

    If you already have a 28 to 135 and a 10D . . . what is wrong with that gear and what can’t you do for “Street Photography” with that lens and camera? These are the first two questions you need to answer.
    Given that you have those two pieces of gear and if you do have a little money to spend, then a second hand 20D (or 30D) would reap better overall results and I agree with Sara’s points.
    What other (if any) lens(es) do you have?
    You are very fortunate that you can (or might be able to) return a lens, because (as it seems) you made a poor choice – I’ve made that comment before.
    WW
     
  29. William, I found I couldn't get far enough away from the people I wanted to photograph without them seeing me - which led to a few difficult conversations! :-/ I just thought a lens like the one I bought might do the trick? (Until I found it was incompatible!)
    My only other Canon lens is the one that came with my old EOS300 - a 28-90mm. (I suppose I could sell that camera too, because I don't need it any more!)
    I can return the lens if I want to - I've checked with the supplier. However, I've asked them to sit tight until I've made my mind up about what I want to do! They're fine with it.
     
  30. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

    You could consider changing your mindset and your approach.
    Arguably, both would serve you better than buying a longer lens.
    I am not suggesting that this is initially easy for some folk to do - but - a 28 to 135 lens on a 10D, I would argue is plenty long enough for mostly all 'Street Photography'.
    The Photography which you are describing is what we term here 'Sniping'. That is a genre of 'Street Photography' for sure - and I am NOT intending to open up a divergent wandering thread arguing the merits or not of (mid to longer) telephoto lenses for 'street work'.
    What I am suggesting is – if you encourage yourself to work a bit closer, with the gear you already have, you will get more ‘engagement’ and many other benefits, also.
    Both these are examples made with a 24 to 105 lens on a 5D – (that’s about the equivalent of a 15mm to 66mm zoom on your camera)
    This little girl I found in a doorway playing with her dog whilst her Mum and Dad were window shopping:
    [​IMG]
    ‘Little Girl in Venice’
    Even for a distant shot – (this at 70mm, which is about 44mm on your camera) a standard zoom allows the ‘whole’ story to be told:
    [​IMG]
    ‘Stand- OVER THERE!’
    WW
    Aside - sorry, my spelling mistake in previous - 'Sarah', not 'Sara'
     
  31. Some from this forum said it the best: "70-300 rocks and 75-300 sucks".
    70-300 is lot more expensive than 75-300 ($500 vs $160 for new ; $300 vs $80 for used at KEH.com)
     
  32. Sanath, there are multiple 75-300 lenses. The Mk III non-IS, currently produced, is one that could best be described as "sucking." The old 75-300 IS, while not the most brilliant lens in the world, is "OK" by most standards. I sold mine for about $350, as I recall, when I upgraded to the newer (but still used) 70-300 IS. I think I spent less than $100 for the upgrade, which was well worth it. And then there are the non-IS MkI and MkII versions, which I presume are probably not as good as the MkIII non-IS.
    I have to agree with William's advice; however, it does take a very positive attitude to approach people and photograph them, especially nowadays when everyone is concerned about litigation, big brother, perverts, and who knows what other possibilities. There one thing for sure, though: Nobody likes to be sniped, so if you're discovered doing it, you'll probably be dealing with an angry person. In my experience, it's much more pleasant simply to be told "no."
    WW -- no problem re the spelling mistake. It happens all the time. It seems the more common spelling these days is without the 'h' on the end.
     
  33. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

    . . . the 'h' is nicer - it is like the 'e' in Anne - it makes a better balanced Proper Noun. I think it was an error of typing fast, rather than a spello. . .
     
  34. Oh! I didn't realise 'sniping' was such a contentious issue (or even that it was called sniping!). A couple of my friends do it all the time and have never been spotted. (I suppose if one published an image of someone taken under those circumstances, then that might lead to problems.) I once spent a whole day leaning out of a hotel window by the sea, photographing people walking along the promenade. Would that be classed as sniping? <:-? (I seem to be doing nothing but putting my foot in it in this thread!)
     
  35. There are no photography police. You are free to photograph in any manner you see fit, including from far away using telephoto lenses. While it is likely that people will react more negatively to that method than if you photographed them more closely with a "standard" focal length, those are sometimes the trade-offs.
    [[I once spent a whole day leaning out of a hotel window by the sea, photographing people walking along the promenade. Would that be classed as sniping?]]
    No, but I, personally, wouldn't call that street photography either.
     
  36. Jane, you have to put yourself in the shoes of others. If you saw some stranger pointing a long telephoto at you, how would you feel about it? On the exact opposite side of courtesy, if someone came up to you and asked if he or she could photograph you, because he or she thought you were photographically interesting, how would you feel? I think most street photogs are somewhere inbetween -- not asking permission, but not hiding or looking sneaky either. I usually shoot first and ask permission to use the photos after. Then once I have permission, I usually shoot more. And yes, I ALWAYS take "no" for an answer. ;-)
     
  37. I've decided to keep the lens I've just bought, and trade in my existing kit for a better Canon SLR - 20/30D or upwards. (I've got some other lenses which only fit the other kit, so they can all go in too.) Currently looking around and making enquiries! :)
     
  38. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

    That's a good choice; good luck.
     
  39. William Michael

    William Michael Moderator Staff Member

  40. Cameras with tilting screens are useful for Street Photography if you want to Snipe!
    I'd buy a camera which has one and it does not have to be an SLR to do this. I'm sure a lot of street photographers use one of the G Series: G9 G10 G11 etc.
    Looking down at your LCD as opposed to holding it up to your eye is less noticeable and also you can shoot over the heads of crowds that way.
     

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