How do you sharpen dog photos

Discussion in 'Digital Darkroom' started by joseph_panico, Mar 9, 2015.

  1. My dumb dog has black hair with some gray/silver mixed in. An unsharpened photo already has the appearance of sharpening artifacts - in the hair around the eyes, snout - so how can you tell when you've gone too far?
    Joe
     
  2. You already have....but it depends how you will display / print it.
    Matte / canvas : sharpen the crap out of it. You can get a lot of mileage here.
    screen / gloss : be as conservative as possible.
    And the best tip: By all means pre-sharpen before you do some work, but only sharpen a copy to print / display. You should leave the original one alone.
     
  3. Another point to note: your screen cannot show as much detail as a print. The screen dpi is between 1/2 to 1/4 of a print. The rule is "if you can see the sharpening" it's too much, on the screen.
    It can take a bit to hold off at first.
     
  4. The rule is "if you can see the sharpening" it's too much, on the screen.​
    Actually, except for intentional excess, "if you can see it's been done, it's been done too much" is a universal rule, much neglected in the pictorialist and post-modern eras.
     
  5. An unsharpened photo already has the appearance of sharpening artifacts - in the hair around the eyes, snout - so how can you tell when you've gone too far?
    Joe​
    It depends on where you want to view the final image. If inline within this thread at 700 pixels the downsampling will severely soften it as demo'ed below where the bottom image is the original sharpened in CS5 ACR viewed at 50% zoom of a 3000x2000 rez Raw image and the final downsampled to 700 pixel.
    So the answer will be different depending on output like say a print.
    00dAjS-555519484.jpg
     
  6. Tim,
    Your dog (photo) looks much like my dog. The lone hair below the eye (upper photo) has a silver color within the overall black: my dog has these around her eyes, snout, nose. It looks much like an artifact from over sharpening when so many appear naturally on the subject/image.
    Thank you all for the input. Just a general question of sorts on my part.
    Joe
     

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