FIlm Camera and Polaroid

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by dan d. chang, Mar 25, 2007.

  1. You can buy Polaroid film, limited varity, expensive, these 185, 190 used to be
    expensive models now worth few dollars. Film camera and film will follow the
    same trend. My local shop no longer take slide film, send out for processing
    price has been increase. today's Polaroid is tomorrow's film and film camera.
     
  2. Well eventually of course, but it will probably become a super-specialist market for a number of decades until it rolls over with it's legs in the air - as has been discussed on this forum ad infinitum . . . .
     
  3. Last year, after buying a Polaroid 600se, I checked out a copy of Ansel Adams' Polaroid book from the local library. In it he lists all the types of Polaroid film which were in production at the time--and the selection available today is pretty much the same.
     
  4. I think Polaroid is in worse position, if not just dead. I have replaced Polaroid proof 4x5" print cartridges with a small cheap digicam. Their prices are prohibitive. Unlike film, Polaroid has been replaced almost completely by digital, thought. At least for me.
     
  5. You can buy Polaroid film, limited varity, expensive, these 185, 190 used to be expensive models now worth few dollars. Film camera and film will follow the same trend. My local shop no longer take slide film, send out for processing price has been increase. today's Polaroid is tomorrow's film and film camera.I suggest you wear a hard-hat whenever you go outside to protect you from a falling chunk of sky. Polaroid was always expensive, always limited in variety, and the instantaneousness never propelled it to kill off traditional film as they predicted it would back in 1948 when the first Land camera came out. If anybody really can predict a timetable for the extinction of film, my suggestion is they put their psychic abilities to better use and play the stock market.
     
  6. Dan, I think you're also missing the point about polaroid.
    Sure, when it first came out, it was a unique proposition because it offered instant pictures. And of course that proposition alone is no longer enough to sustain it in the market because it has clearly been eroded by digital. But if you think that's the only reason someone might want to use polaroid then you're a little out of touch.
    Take a look at polanoid.net if you're in any doubt. Polaroid film has become the tool of choice for a certain type of image and has a strong following in the fine art market, and interestingly is having something of a resurgence among younger photographers. It's very easy to buy polaroid film online and the most common types are routinely available. And of course the same is true of film generally, especially black and white.
    To take a personal example, I sold off my film cameras for digital in 1996. And in 2004 I switched back to film, and have shot almost nothing except TX and TMZ for 3 years. I know a number of other photographers who have made similar choices. It's certainly true that the film market has consolidated, but far from dying out, is actually enjoying a recent resurgence in certain areas, and a number of commercial photographers are embracing it again because it offers a point of distinction.
     
  7. Ken, I was just going through Adams' book, "Singular Images", again with nothing but polaroid shots he took. Great book. He notes the Type 55 and 105 (I don't know what the latter is). It inspired me to take out my 4x5 today and shoot some 55 for personal shots. There is probably nothing more satisfying in photography than shooting with this film (once you get over the price!<g>).
     
  8. i use the positive negative film all the time. it is great stuff! i recently bought 100 packs to
    stave off the inevitable. i use it primarily in my modded graflex xlsw. also in my horseman.
     

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