aspect ratio

Discussion in 'Digital Darkroom' started by almorrisphotography, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. Hi all. Recently when viewing my website on a wide screen monitor I noticed the aspect ratio for my images was wrong and the images were stretched and squashed. I assume this is not typical on all wide screen monitors? I am wondering if this is just on a cheap monitor or do I need to adjust the way I post images. My website is almorrisphotography.com created by blu domain. Any thoughts?
    Thanks,
    Take care,
    Al
     
  2. Do all images shown on that computer seem wrong? It's possible the user of that computer has got the display set to a non-native resolution.
     
  3. It's just likely that your OS has a wrong screen driver and the os does not get fed the correct aspect ratio information. What OS are you using?
     
  4. Al: The pictures on your site are the right aspect ratio. Your friend's monitor must be set to the wrong ratio as Matt said. One thing about your site. Maybe its me, but I found it hard to move around. Pictures didn't come up quickly, or stopped, it isn't clear how a person who's never been to your site how to work it. That's important because strangers who might not be that computer literate who want to see your work are not familiar with how it operates and you only have one shot at making new customers. You want to make it was easy as possible for them to see your work. You might want to take a look at this and tweak it. Good luck. Alan
     
  5. Thanks guys for the quick respone. The other computer was running xp and I hope its a glitch on that computer. Alan, thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it. I realize I need to do some tweaking now I have read your comments.
    Good luck, take care
    Al
     
  6. Some monitors do not have equal height and width per pixel.
    That screws up the display geometry. Circles look like ovals, etc.
    I have a Dell monitor with that problem.
    There's nothing you can do about it.
    - Leigh
     
  7. Thanks Leigh. So, If I was to buy a wide screen monitor in the future, what aspect is the correct one? I'd hate to buy one and that happen.
    thanks, take care
    Al
     
  8. It's the computer, not your website with the distorted pics. That's what happens when the monitor stretches the image to full screen size when you don't have the right video driver and monitor support loaded.
    Now, about your website:
    Poor info about yourself, rewrite it in a positive manner, you are labeling yourself as an assistant, not a photographer.
    Contact info, where the bleep are you in the world. Google can figure it out with the clues in about me, but you should be telling everyone.
    Turn off the music. Have an option to turn it on, and do you have a license to rebroadcast it?
    Image loading is slower than molasses in January, prospects will be bored quickly. Did you create the flash with full size images instead of downsampled ones?
    Navigation buttons are small contact points within the button frame on the thumb nail display at the bottom of the image.
    All the best, hope you have nice weather this summer.
    Bob
     
  9. So, If I was to buy a wide screen monitor in the future, what aspect is the correct one? I'd hate to buy one and that happen.​
    Hi Al,
    The aspect ratio standard for many years had been 4:3, as in 800x600 or 1024x768. If you measured the viewable area of the monitor, it also had a 4:3 aspect ratio, like 12"x9" or 16"x12" or whatever.
    A problem arose some years ago when demand grew for "wide" displays.
    If a company wants to make a monitor wider, thus raising its selling price, there are two options:
    1) add more pixels (increased cost), or
    2) make each pixel wider (~zero cost).
    As you might expect, the second option was the one favored by many vendors. The argument was that it preserved the logical aspect ratio expected by many programs. That argument is specious.
    Monitors available for the past decade or so have abandoned this approach because consumers didn't like the "squished" look, so now the logical aspect ratio matches the physical, at least when selecting some resolutions. Most monitors still support the older 4:3 raio for compatability, but with widened pixels.
    If you buy a new monitor, confirm that the default resolution matches the physical aspect ratio of the screen.
    - Leigh
     
  10. Looks perfectly fine on a Mac with Mac OSX and no fiddling around with any software...like I always say...PC= Poor Choice.
     
  11. Monitors available for the past decade or so have abandoned this approach because consumers didn't like the "squished" look, so now the logical aspect ratio matches the physical, at least when selecting some resolutions. Most monitors still support the older 4:3 raio for compatability, but with widened pixels.​
    Sorry, this just isn't true. The aspect ratio is provided by the monitor driver and is passed down the chain through the GDI. When a graphic chunk is displayed, the aspect ratio is a provided parameter. Like colour correction information, it is up to the programmer to implement the information at hand.
    As I indicated earlier, you need to apply the correct monitor driver for your monitor. With out it, you get a best guess from your video card.
    The ability to correct for the Aspect Ratio has been in windows at least as far back as Windows 3.1. It was in the System.ini file.
     
  12. The logical aspect ratio MUST match the physical aspect ratio, otherwise a circle will display as an oval.
    It's one of those laws of physics things. Has nothing to do with the driver or other software.
    - Leigh
     
  13. It has a lot to do with the system not getting the correct information, as it would otherwise display correct images. What do you thing is on those CD's that come with the monitors?
     
  14. It has absolutely nothing to do with what's on the CDs. I've written drivers, so I know what they are.
    If you try to display an 800x600 raster on a full 18"x12" screen IT WILL BE DISTORTED.,
    There's no software in the world that will change that.
    You could marquee it down to 16"x12", which is a 4:3 aspect ratio, and it would look fine.
    But you cannot display it full-screen as described above without distortion.
    - Leigh
     
  15. Hi Al,
    The same happened to me here at work. Hopefully, all you have to do is the set the resolution to the manufacturer recommended one. That solved my problem.
    Cheers,
    GS
     

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