5D Mark ll

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by stella_blunt, Jun 29, 2014.

  1. Can some tell me where in nyc I can take my 5D Mark I I. For service .
    Nothing wrong with it , but going on a location shoot out of the country and want to make sure all is ok .
    Own it for 3 years and have never had it serviced , so think I should ?
    Thanks for any info .
    Stella
     
  2. I also have the 5D Mark II. Working on the if it aint broke, don't fix it principle I just clean the sensor, get some new batteries and make sure the lenses are all nice and clean. If you are not confident about the slightly fiddly business of cleaning the sensor yourself I would get that done professionally.
     
  3. The obvious answer is this:
    http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/about_canon?pageKeyCode=pressreldetail&docId=0901e02480866b23
    If you have used your Canon only lightly and not under extreme conditions, it may not need servicing - I have a Mk II of this age and condition and will not be taking it for servicing any time soon.
     
  4. If you're being hired to go to another country to shoot something, your dependability should come in the form of a backup camera. There's no guarantee your camera will be absolutely rock-solid reliable, even after cleaning/servicing. Of course a sensor cleaning might be a good idea.
     
  5. My 5D2s have served faithfully for years - and have yet to need routine servicing. I routinely shoot them in reasonably harsh conditions (though not dusty), and beat the heck out of them on a routine basis. Part of the business. If this is an important shoot, I would certainly send it in to Canon to check it up and have it cleaned - even though there is no necessity, it will only add significantly to your piece of mind which is of exceptional value.
    Buuuuuut, frankly there is another issue alluded too, IMO it doesn't matter if nothing is wrong with it - If this is the sole camera you are taking on 'a location shoot out of the country' you are taking an unacceptable risk. This is especially true if you are being paid to shoot this.
    ...because, while there is certainly no reason to expect something to suddenly deadline the camera, something as simple as tripping over an unnoticed rock in the road can easily kill a camera (any camera) - especially if that road happens to be next to a stream (though there are almost never streams/culverts/water next to roads ;) ). If you are shooting professionally not having the same (or very similar) gear in backup is negligent -- Especially in a location where you can't simply drive to a store and buy a replacement. A mere $1500 (or less) will easily get you another 5D2 or a 6D - If your budget is pushed $6-700 will get you a backup functional 5D which would keep you in familiar focal length territory and is as capable for much.
     
  6. +10 for the backup camera. It doesn't have to be an expensive back-up but you absolutely must have it.
    For the record, I would not send any camera anywhere right before an event unless I was prepared for delays in servicing, the possible need for an undiscovered repair and had time to give the camera a thorough work-out upon its return.
    Clean the sensor, test your cleaning job, provide yourself with a backup and have a great trip.
     
  7. If your back up camera is an APS-C one, then you have the advantage of two formats - any telephoto or long lens will be 1.6X cropped. The smallest, cheapest, and lightest would be a "Rebel/XXXD"
     
  8. One thing that usually needs replacement after a few years is the backup battery, you may want to consider replacing it. No need to take it to a service center for this if you are able to unscrew and re-screw a small screw or two (can't remember how many there were). And yes, take a backup with you just in case.
     
  9. Thank you all for the great informative responses ! I am going to rent a 5d mark lll as a back up to take .and extra
    batteries.
    And after all the info here I will not service the Mark ll , as it's seems fine !
    Best, Stella
     
  10. One thing that usually needs replacement after a few years is the backup battery, you may want to consider replacing it.​
    Very good advice! I remember taking a research trip to Singapore and having a rather specialized microphone battery go kapoot. Mind you, the battery was MADE in Singapore, so I thought it would be no big deal to replace it. I spent 3 days just tracking the stupid thing down. A bad battery can really ruin your whole day -- or three.
     
  11. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    One thing that usually needs replacement after a few years is the backup battery, you may want to consider replacing it.​

    The "backup battery" only maintains the date and time. If it fails during a trip it can be a pain but it isn't going to affect usage.
     
  12. "The "backup battery" only maintains the date and time. If it fails during a trip it can be a pain but it isn't going to affect usage."
    I think that depends on the camera (and, having never had one fail on my 5D2s I can't say for certain), but you are right in that all it does is provides continuous power to do that when one is replacing the main battery. It can also affect camera settings, including custom functions, and saved values. While it *shouldn't* ever affect 'normal' shooting, it's lack of consistent power output can corrupt the FW. I recall having the FW on my XTi corrupted when the time/date battery finally died - but a failing battery's voltage can fluctuate (which is what likely caused my problem - though who can say, it might have been a random muon!).
    That said, I kind of feel that's a little overkill, to me, like replacing the car's battery before taking a road trip - not because of failure, but simply because it's a few years old. although a time/date batt is considerably cheaper ;)
     
  13. Canon has a repair facility in NJ
     
  14. david_henderson

    david_henderson www.photography001.com

    I'm not sure that today's cameras require "servicing". Have a backup ( I use my old 5D) and use the camera till something goes awry. When you pay for one of Canon's quite expensive repairs there seems to be a process of checking lens calibrations etc that goes alongside. Check your batteries' recharge performance and buy new when they fall away (as they will) and keep lenses, camera and sensor clean. That's about it.
     
  15. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    While it *shouldn't* ever affect 'normal' shooting, it's lack of consistent power output can corrupt the FW.​

    I'd like to see some documentation of that. Canon is pretty clear that it is a date/time backup only.
     
  16. Jeff, you're right, of course, that you can still use the camera with a dead backup cell. The only problem is that you'll lose all your settings whenever you swap main batteries, because the FW will reboot. You either have to be content with the default settings at every power-up, or you have to set up all over again each time. Many people's cameras are heavily set up. I've tweaked maybe a dozen custom functions (e.g. button reassignments) on my cameras, so using default settings would be rather awkward and unproductive.
     
  17. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    Canon is pretty clear that the settings are written into non-volatile memory, which means settings should not disappear.
     

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