50D - unsharp pictures :(

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by OPK, Apr 21, 2010.

  1. OPK

    OPK

    My 50D produced most of the time unsharp pictures. probably was the AF issue - something like misfocus issue...
    I know there is AF microadjustment but for me sounds like a company's joke. It's not a rocket science make a properly worked auto focus.
    so, I had to sold it. did you get similar problem? I really liked that camera but now I'm concern their overall quality. Do other Canon products has similar issues? I'm thinking now on 5D mark II but what will be if that product would have same problem?
    p.s
    I'm familliar with all the postproduction stuff in PS, DPP and Lightroom.
     
  2. from what I've seen the 50D produced extremely sharp pics with the kit lens, why don't post a pic?
     
  3. I have a few extremely sharp examples posted.
    "most of the time" means you got a few good shots? If so, the problem was not the camera.
     
  4. OPK

    OPK

    I have a tons of sharp pictures. I work as a photographer on several bodies.... It never happened to me with Nikon cameras and one example of rented 5D mark II. so....human factor could be put aside.
    don't you think is a some kind of quality control. maybe my 50D was just faulty?
    I heard xxD has AF much worse in a accuracy than xD bodies.
     
  5. OPK

    OPK

    look on that 100% crop. AF point was set on a lips....
    ....and look on a neck
    f 5, 1/200 iso200
    00WI4P-238167684.jpg
     
  6. No problems with mine, which I have had for a year or so. It has been a great body. Most of my problems have originated a few inches behind the viewfinder.
    AF is not magic. Whether it works well depends on how you have it set (e.g., center point only, etc.) and where you aim the autofocus points. If the camera focuses, but on a place that you did not want, that is user error, not the camera's fault. It is the equipment's fault if AF has locked onto something correctly but the image is out of focus. that is the reason for microadjustment. However, I have tested 4 of my lenses (3 Canon, one Tamron) on my 50D and did not need to adjust for any of them. Other people have had different experiences.
     
  7. I would say you either got a bad copy and should send it to Canon for recalibration, or its user error with the AF. The 5D II has the same AF system so I doubt it will solve the problem. If you want a camera with better AF, look at the 1D series. The 1D III and 1DS II would probably be in the same price range as a 5D II.
     
  8. In general, starting out by blaming the equipment or the company is not the most productive approach. In the end, you might be right in a few cases - but there is at least as good of a chance that there are other explanations for the problem. (And if you do have an out of adjustment lens under warranty, it is a simple matter to send it to Canon for adjustment or replacement.)
    Aside from the possibility of a "bad lens," there are a number of things that could explain your issue:
    • Hand held shots - even at high shutter speeds - create conditions in which OOF is more likely. For example, some photographers who AF handheld shots lock focus and inadvertently move forward/backward, shifting the point of focus.
    • the subject is not completely still.
    • They "focus and recompose," not realizing that there are difficulties with this technique, especially at larger apertures.
    • They have multiple AF points active and the camera - as it should - attempts a compromise between multiple activated points.
    • They rely on in-camera sharpening settings but have not selected the optimum setting for their shots.
    • They shoot RAW and either don't sharpen in post (which is absolutely necessary if you shoot RAW and want "sharp") or they don't sharpen correctly. ("No PP" WILL be soft if you shoot RAW.)
    • They view at 100% magnification and think that slight softness that is entirely insignificant and invisible in a good size print will be a problem - when it won't.
    • Related, some have odd and unrealistic ideas of what "normal" sharpness is or the circumstances in which it is possible and/or desirable.
    The most useful approach is to try to isolate the problem by doing some simple tests that remove variables, with the outcome being a clearer idea of what causes the problem - is it the lens? is it he photographer? is it post-processing?
    1. Put the camera on a tripod and take steps to maintain perfect camera stability: use a remote release or the automatic timer, use mirror lockup or a live view mode.
    2. Photograph an uncomplicated, static subject with clear detail. The subject should be parallel to the sensor so that all parts are the same distance from the camera.
    3. Let the camera AF, then switch AF off without adjusting focus.
    4. Make a series of exposures in aV mode, shifting aperture to each value that you are likely to use, for example f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, and f/11 on crop.
    5. For a quick and dirty front/rear focus test, simply repeat the steps twice - once focused very slightly in front of the point determined by AF and once focused slightly beyond.
    This removes many of the variables that might create OOF photos and gives you control over the focus-related variable of aperture. Any outcomes from this sort of test are useful:
    • You might confirm that there is a lens/camera problem. You can now tell Canon what you tested and how, and you can even give them photographic evidence - this makes the fix easier and more likely.
    • You might confirm that there is a technique issues - which you can address and resolve. This could include camera settings, post processing issues, shooting technique, etc. Ruling one or more of these "out" helps you with your request to Canon for resolution; ruling one or more of them "in" lets you improve your photography.
    Dan
     
  9. This post sounds suspiciously like a critter lurking under the bridge, which probably explains the less than sympathetic reception you've got here.
    Let's see, you get a camera with "bad focus," you think, so instead of trying to see if there is an actual problem that can be fixed, you sell the camera to someone else. Of course, you told the buyer they were getting a "dead raccoon" (Procyon lotor terminus), right?
    G Dan's response would be right to the point, except that you don't have the camera any more. My advice is for you to stick with Nikon. That way, everybody will be happier.
     
  10. OPK

    OPK

    thanks for helpful responses....some of them was, but other pointed to human factor. for over 15 years had over 10 different cameras (canon too). some of them have up to this time, and I love them.
    shutter speed 1/200 is not a long time to remove position from correct focus to out of focus. especially at this aperture on 50mm.
    the store who bought 50D was the same who sold me it before - they buy from me used cameras....so, there was no dead racoon.
    on this (and other) forums is many threads on inaccuracy in 50D and I went suspisious. Its just a camera, not a spaceship. I just wonder how companies droping a ball.......Is it so hard to control quality? especially nowadays, when PRO cameras are three times as expensive as 20 years ago. AF isn't a new technology - they invented it in early eighties!
     
  11. OPK

    OPK

    here is an example without PP (totally no sharpening) RAW default from ACR.
    it is sharp as it should be. AF was directed at lips too....but possibility to take such a properly sharpen shot was like a 3 to 10. almost 70% was rubbish. each time AF indicator confirmated sharpness.
    00WI9G-238209584.jpg
     
  12. Though no expert my opinion on my copy of the 50D is that it is able to create perfectly sharp pictures.
    Now and then I struggle with the size of the AF point that's bigger than the little red square. (Centerpoint AF)
    Now and the I struggle with post processing (Canon uses noise reduction even at ISO 100).
    And I always handhold so there's always the chance of error.
    But when the stars align the 100% pixel peep using sharpness setting 3 or 4 is very sharp indeed.
     
  13. M von Weinberg
    "This post sounds suspiciously like a critter lurking under the bridge"

    yep, sounds like a Nikon troll !
    for examples of 50D pics go to:
    http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=50d&ct=0&mt=photos&adv=1
    www.photography-on-the.net
     
  14. OPK

    OPK

    I'm sorry, is it a forum paid by Canon? and no threads on problems with theirs products are welcome?
    >>> Brett: do you can think wider than your brand. It doesn't matter at all. I made several sessions with rented 5D and everything was ok. I understand that you already have a tack sharp version of 50D.....
     
  15. "AF microadjustment but for me sounds like a company's joke"
    A few years ago I had three identical bodies and noticed a front focus issue with one lens on one body (it worked fine on the other two bodies). I sent both the camera and lens in for service. The problem was corrected (it was the body). Had I had a micro adjustment feature on the camera, I could have corrected the problem myself.
    Assuming the AF spot was as described on your sample shot, you had a back focus issue which possibly could have been easily corrected with a micro adjustment or by having Canon service it.
    "Do other Canon products has similar issues? " Probably cameras from all manufacturers can have this issue. It is easy to correct.
     
  16. I used a 50D for over year and AF was usually spot on. For the rare lens with back or front focus it allows you to easily adjust for consistently sharp images. The process only took me about 20 minutes and that's because I was doing it for the first time.
     
  17. OPK

    OPK

    thank you Elliot for your answer. It gives a simple solution. next time I'll send body to Canon and just ask for alignment.
     
  18. Try this first: http://focustestchart.com/chart.html
     
  19. [[I'm sorry, is it a forum paid by Canon? and no threads on problems with theirs products are welcome?]
    It's a forum for people who are willing to think through the problem rather than just making incorrect assumptions and looking for people to validate them.
     
  20. OPK

    OPK

    Rob,
    problem was solved with a help from Elliot. AF was misaligned and its just strange and funny for me that a manufacturer is unable to produced a properly worked gear. Now I know what to do with probably next Canon body in a case of unsharp pictures........service. It's something new for me. I just thought that camera for xxxx $ should work.
     
  21. Martin, you still don't have a clue why people reacted the way they did to your post and your subsequent responses, do you?
    Or do you?
    It all comes down to whether you are really as naive as you present yourself to be.
     
  22. It is unfortunate that no one is perfect and no company is perfect. When you produce as many cameras and lenses as Canon does every now and then 1 makes it out that needs adjustment. Its that way with every company out there.I have had mostly good equipment from Canon. The only exception was a D II that I had to send for adjustment. It didn't cost me anything to get it done and it has worked great every sense. I am sorry you had a bad experience. I hope you have better luck with future purchases as Canon is not the only company that will have to do warranty work for it's customers. That is why they have a whole department dedicated to nothong but warrenty service.
     
  23. I have not had any problems with the 50D I have after I learned how to use it best suited for my needs. I use mine all of the time and get great sharp crispy images consistently.
     
  24. OK, Martin. You are right. All Canon cameras are trash. Canon doesn't know how to make a camera. The lenses are awful, too. Can't possibly make photographs with them. Everyone else is nuts. Canon pays all of us to post glowing reviews of everything they make. And, being Canon owners, we have no ethics so we accept the payola and post lies. And every "sharpness" problem is always due to a (Canon!) camera flaw that results from Canons' awful design, terrible manufacturing, and lack of consideration for consumers. Except of course, those who they are paying off.
    Or maybe not...
     
  25. My 50D has been great from day 1.
     
  26. I like the AF performance of the 50D. I don't get how someone could really like a camera, detect AF issues with it, sell it at a loss without ever even making an attempt to determine the real cause of the AF trouble, or give the warranty folks at Canon a chance to make it right, and then go on the net and suggest that xxD cameras have AF and general quality control issues.... Smells a bit fishy to me...
    Anyway, here is my "AF on the bottom lip", over 100% crop contribution. From my 50D, 1/125, f/5.6, single shot AF, handheld. DPP RAW to jpg standard conversion. I have no complaints about AF on the 50D in any situation to date.
    [​IMG]
     
  27. I am getting nauseous looking at lips.
     
  28. I've had my 50D for sometime now, no AF problems! Did have some backfocusing with one of my lenses on my EOS3 but not a big problem . . . Does not take much with FTM to make some manual adjustment!
    Also had the Canon Elan 7e with the eye control focusing . . . Great! . . . Fantastic . . .Loved it!
    When used and calibrated properly, and even with my being an eyeglass wearer, it was much better than the "poor reputation" that it acquired. In my opinion, those complaining about it were not taking the time to take the advice and instructions given in the User's manual to Calibrate, Calibrate, Calibrate!
    So, with my 50D it's a comfort to know that it has AF Microadjustment if I ever need it. Of course I will have to take the time to read the User's manual to learn how to do it!
    Or, . . . guess I could just complain here!
     
  29. OPK

    OPK

    sure, you can calibrate as you wish.....but what if one time AF indicate properly and another completely wrong?
    turns out that AF point in viewpoint is much smaller than actual focus area - that causes many misleadings, especially when AF is not properly calibrated.
    you can see couple of my examples. both cases AF pointed on a lips
    so, problem was solved several posts earlier. solution is clear and obvious.
     
  30. Just so you all know : I hate you all. I cannot for the life of me take pics like that
    1) I don't know anybody with lips like that
    2) I just ain't that good, so I'll just hate you all.
    ;-)
     
  31. Photo number 1 is focused on the subject's neck, not her lips. This happens with some frequency. AF systems like to focus on necks and collarbones. I don't know why.
    Why are you focusing on lips instead of eyes?
    Why not try a smaller aperture so your focus problems won't be so noticeable?
     

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