Visiting winter

visiting winter seeking critique cesnakevicius ceslovas

Tags: visiting winter seeking critique

Category: Abstract

Author: Cesnakevicius Ceslovas

Gallery: Single Photos

Published:
Thursday 15th of March 2007 09:20:30 AM

Comments

Marino Thorlacius
I just shake my head when I see pictures like that. This is so tecnically brilliant without overdoing anything. Flawless work !!!

Giedrius Zukauskas
!!! Labai gera!

Patrick Flynn
This is really unique. The POV, the composition, the extraneous elements are all very original. The overall effect is very positive and thought-provoking. Where did you shoot this? Is that background real? Would you mind sharing to what extent you manipulated this image? It's so impressive.

Martynas Milkevicius
Well done! Nuostabus darbelis!

Floriana Barbu
Looove it !

Albinas Balzekas
Labai!

Brian Rosenbloom
This works so well because it is believable.

Ryan Young
Truly an amazing work. Congratulations! - Ryan

Dan Talpau
perfect perfect. One of the best i've seen lately on photo.net.

Jitka Unverdorben
Very nice photo.

AKION SUNG-JAE
Very very NICE!!! You are always suprised me. Your picture a book of fairy-tale.

Kurt Nielsen
This is wonderful and makes me smile inside and outside. You have a wonderful gift and use your talent well.

Alpo Syvänen
Nice one... (Actually I am raving because of the impact of this one...) This is one more genuine masterpiece from you! Straight into my wall and quickly. :-) This comment could be interpreted so, that I really love this image. Alpo

Rachel Blaser
Absolutely beautiful - the winding tracks and the rolling hills are just wonderful. To be the first to contribute a slightly nitpicky comment (sorry) you might note that the shadows of the trees are a bit softer, and more blue in tone, than the shadow of the man, and the fore/midground snow seems very slightly warmer than the hills - this could be my monitor deceiving me as well. I think it's a wonderfully charming picture, though - visually arresting and appealing to the imagination.

Joshua Glaser
Dude, not much to say, just shaking my head, truely wonderful.

James P. Jones
great What a great image. hell, I don't know how much is photo and how much is post work, but just as a graphical image - what a great image. wonderful.

Richard --
What if the balloon were red? Hmmmmmmm? Love your creativity! Richard

Fred Young
This is an excellent example of talent in composing the idea, photographing the idea and processing all into a wonderful image.

Stuart Alan Hill
Intrest The image is nice but the only thing that makes it one is that it is such a great scene and the leading line in the snow. But really anyone could have taken this image. Im not saying this is a Bad one cause it is not, but people u need to realise that there is so much more to photography.

Andy Brimmell
Terrific Zen-like image, I could almost eat it, but not without post production surely.

Oliver Krueger
Gorgeous Image!!! I love the graphical style of a children's book... Cheers, Oliver

joe dragon
Visiting Winter This is a wonderful image experiencing quiet and solitude. The exposure is very good. As others have said, I would like to know a little more about post work. Also, if you controlled the figure, a moderate red or orange ballon, even though "traditional", would have added aditional impact. I believe your choice of blue was to tie in the sky which is a good idea. Since I prefer pos. and neg. comments about my own work, so as to grow, some observations--the prominent peak in the Middle bothers me some and the snow covered hills appear to be a little artificial. I think eliminating most of the blue sky, except for the pieces under the clouds, would actually strengthen the quiet and solitude of this fine image. Despite my neg. comments, I do like the creative idea of seeing this and/or putting it together. Joe Dragon

claudiu nemes
!!!???!!! Very great composition, but... I'm very confused! PhotoNet is not about photography? Also is not a space for photographers with at least 1 year of experience? How could anyone believe that this image is a real photo? How could anyone ask details about exposures, colors etc.? Again, very great idea, composition etc., but this image is not a real photo!!!

Jong Bum Kwon
Hi This is just an amazing photo. I feel like seeing a fairy tale painting. Great work.

Simon Jenkins
Really stunning work, very clever.

Daniel Simionescu
Real or not, I love it. Congratulations! PS: (for Claudiu), this site is called photo.net, not realphoto.net or notdigitalalteratedimages.net :)

Andrius Sprindys
liux geras!

Anuar Patjane
:) Unique and fantastic work! Please keep sharing. Regards!

shlomo hanegbi
winter beautifull high key

Fernando Olea
Great image
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
Friedrich Nietzsche


One should die proudly when it is no longer possible to live proudly.
Friedrich Nietzsche

Peter Montanti
What a fun image. Perfect art. Who is the guy with the baloon? What is he doing? The tracks lead to the right, change direction toward the left and back right again. Is he aimlessly wandering or just changing his mind as to where to go? Architectural Photography by Peter Montanti, www.mountainphotographics.com

S. Mock
The blue balloon and shoes trail are very interesting. Amazing picture! Good job!

Pierre Dumas
Excellent work! I wish I could take pictures like this! PDE

Olof Dybeus
This one is fantastic! So beautiful and original, with perfect tones all over. The surreal feeling makes me think of the artist Magritte. A favorite for me!

Mike Smith
Nicely done I like this image because it looks fake. It gives it a dreamy and surreal quality. If it looked like a perfect photo (which would be impossible, since snow covered hills wouldn't form quite like that), then I would just think you found the perfect spot and had someone walk out there with a balloon. That would actually be a lot easier than coming up with the idea on your own. I've also noticed that most of the people with unnecessarily harsh opinions have few or no photos up, so they can dish it out, but don't want anybody to be able to take a shot at them. I'm talking to you, claudiu nemes and Lech Dobrzanski (I've also noticed it on other photos, but I'm choosing to call everyone out on this one). And Stuart Alan Hill, what are you talking about? "Anyone could have taken this picture". WHAT? Nobody could have taken this picture!! This scene doesn't exist.

Steve Wagner
Is this a photograph If this is real it's absolutely stunning. It's a spectacular piece of art. That said it doesn't look even remotely real. Details would be appreciated, maybe post the original raw exposure. Raw original should have to be posted next to all POTWs. Photo.net has little credibility otherwise.

Lech Dobrzanski
The outcome of activity matters and not in depth analysis of creation process such as: - good job - perfect shot - fine bokeh - well done - this is the best of yours and many others. This image is a joke. It seems likely that this is a patchwork one can spot pinned on a kitchen wall.

J. Arthur Jackson
Nice Work Seeing creations like this one reminds me why I visit this site as often as I can. Excellent job, this is truly a work of art.

Patrick Hudepohl
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Please note the following:

Richard Cox
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

I like this image because it is different. However, it does not look real; or at least, staged. The mountains/hills do not look real. A person would not normally walk in a crooked manner. The balloon has no practical purpose. It is a fun image, but can't be taken seriously.

Bill Tate
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

I was so pleased to see this surreal image here this week that I felt I must comment immediately. Ceslovas, you capture what is best about surrealistic art. I spent the past half hour looking with wonder at your wonderful portfolio. As usual, the elves don't choose the best of the artist's work to bring up for discussion on POW, however this is more or less typical of what you offer. (In my view, the photo titled "Solaris" is the best.)

I don't pretend to know how you achieve these wonderful works, but I do like what I see. Also, I dont pretend to fully understand the art, but it is most enjoyable. I can see little that I could improve by cropping or other changes in this image. At first, I thought the sky tilted a little to the right, but I have satisfyied myself that this is not so. Generally, your skies are about the main attraction in your works, and me being a cloud buff, became more interested in them than the rest of your pictures.

If I was to change anything about this picture, it would be the pinkish cast given the snow covered forground. it seems to stop before reaching the hills in the background. I might try a similar color or possibly a shade darker for those background hills.

Congratulations on being the chosen one for this week!

Willie the Cropper

Ceslovas Cesnakevicius
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

I am very pleased and the same time surprised (knowing the controversy among the photographers about this kind of images) this image was selected as POW.
I was thinking here, I should write some short story-comment on the image.
One winter day, sitting at home, I started thinking of how year after year our winters were getting milder and milder (that winter, in the middle of january there was no snow at all). I started comparing winters in my childhood, when we used to have snowbanks reaching higher than knees, ice hockey, skiing and many other winter activities with my friends..Anyway, some sort of panic suddenly appeared. I thought, what if this is it.. no more real winter.. Luckily in some week it 'arrived'. Still being under that pressure, I started running around with my camera shooting every possible snow hump :)
'Visiting winter' is my tribute to the season- white, cold, calm, slippy, melancholic, joyful..

Nestor Botta
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

"A person would not normally walk in a crooked manner." Unless the guy is drunk... ;-) I think that in this case that's the value of the image, with a surreal touch, making every viewer wonder why this or that is composed in such a way, etc.

A viewer might guess that the image was, at least, staged in a real scenario. Although that, photography is still valid to express an idea, a feeling or just share an imaginative concept with others, in whatever manner the photographer consider it valid.

MODERATOR NOTE: comment edited with regard to the age old argument about photo vs image. Some may have forgotten and some might not realize that the only reference to manipulation on the POW forum is to critique the effectiveness/ineffectiveness of the manipulation... Manipulation can be discussed in terms of whether it should have been used or not based on the quality or the result and/or impact etc. etc. etc... NOT weather it is a photo or graphic. NOT if it is worthy or should be a POW or not etc... From here on down, the discussion went way off topic. Much editing and deletions have had to occur. Please read the link above in the Intro by Patrick for the guidelines for this strict critique forum. Thanks.

Ceslovas Cesnakevicius
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Thank you Nestor. I used 4 photos for this image. You have to admit that it would be difficult to make a sigle shot photo fo such a composition. I really didn't mean to occupy some real photographs place in some 'charts', but photo.net does have digital alternation and fine art categories..
Thinking otherwise what is real photography nowadays? Is pinhole real photography? HDR ? Unnatural compositions-scenes with models? ND filters and so on..

Nestor Botta
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Ceslovas, thanks for your answer. From the very first moment of photography's history and by definition, a photo is not reality, but just a cut-off from the real world. That's was the central point of Susan Sontag's argument considering photography a surrealistic media.

The central point here is that the image looks quite believable as a real photographed scene - that speaks loud about your digital editing skills. The "unreality" it's not as obvious as in your other images. And that's exactly what frustrate me: the lack of "obviousness", and not the fact that it's a composite. The illusion of thinking for a little while that such a scenario could have ever exist but it didn't...

What really matters at the end of the day, is the viewer's personal approach to the subject, i.e. a "subjective" one.

Walter Tatulinski
With all respect...

to the artist, this is an interesting graphic composite image cleanly constructed, but as a photograph, I feel it falls short. While the image was indeed constructed from four separate photographs as the artist freely admits (thank you Ceslovas!), these individual elements by themselves are unremarkable and appear, at least to me, not to have presented much challenge nor have broken any new ground. The combination of these elements, on the other hand, does present an interesting and fun, albeit unreal, image.

I can see where those who enjoy constructed images would find this an appealing work; for those of us who prefer more empahsis on "in camera" results there would be a separation along this path. Perhaps that is why many responders, and the POW Elves, found this particular composite to be a good choice for this forum: it should foster quite a bit of discussion. Regards.

Rebecca Sandidge
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Ceslovas - I love your photograph/image. The photo is possible - elaborate staging, but possible. Photography is "Light Writing". So you write with software rather than a brush/paint or pen/ink. . I used to be a film photo snob but a year ago I bit the bullet big time and have opened my eyes to an entire new world of art. I love taking a "perfect image" and playing with photoshop and many plug-ins. Sometimes the photo is great by itself and sometimes it gets a "Wow factor" when altered in some way.
I have to disagree with anyone commenting on hints of color "not matching" - not one person has the exact same calibration or room light conditions. I tend to stay away from comments in this area. But one person above had the same idea I did - what if the balloon was red? That was my only and initial reaction to what I thought was an otherwise perfect choice for POW.
Ceslovas - keep up the good work. I for one, really like your style. You have an eye for what will catch people's attention.

ND Trivette
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

First off - awesome photography Ceslovas. It takes much more creativity to assemble photographs to convey an artistic vision than to just hike into the woods and take one shot. As a new style photographer, using a DSLR and Photoshop to output to a inkjet print. It is rare that people can compose photos to make them seamlessly blend to the trained eye, but when they do they should be applauded for being at the top of their game in their chosen field of art. (That said, this is clearly made of composites) For years painters and other artists have used reference photographs to pick elements to assemble into images on canvas, when are we going to afford this luxury to actual photographers?

Konstantin Yudintsev
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

This piece sent shivers through. And it doesn't matter not one logical bit to me if it's a composite. This is Art, man! And I want it on my wall!
Homo Ludens "Playing Man"

Anders Hingel
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

I do not especially fancy this POW of Ceslovas. I find it déjà-vue and lacking fantasy. The title is fun! In my eyes it does not deserve much attention and neither discussion.
The portfolio of Ceslovas include however a series of much more interesting surrealistic work. See his "Next Station" for example which is fun and well made.
What Ceslovas does so skillfully is imagery based of photos.

Gordon JB
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

I have no issue with the fact that this is a contruct built from four images. I do feel that, in this particular instance , building a single image from four uninteresting images has resulted in a single uninteresting image. It leaves me as cold and empty as the imaginary landscape. A few of Ceslovas other images are amusing.

James Perdue
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Striking image Ceslovas. On one level I would judge this by how it has emotionally impacted me, not how it was created. My first feeling reflected an awe of the subject. An awe of nature's continuing surprises and beauty. Secondly, I felt an awe towards the photographer for BEING THERE, and for having the technical abilities to present this to me so well.
Once I knew it was constructed, my feeling towards the photographer switched to an admiration for his technical abilities to use the tools of digital image manipulation and the projection of his IMAGINATION. I was disappointed in the reality of the subject, as it is not real but imagined. I think that there are different feelings that an "imagist" can convey to an audience and one of them is the beauty and reality of a specific subject, like an awesome landscape or a beautiful person or animal. With minimum digital alteration and maximum photographic talent, his duty is to record for us the beauty and reality of the moment.
However, that same "imagist" can convey an imaginary animal or person or landscape to us and let our own imagination fly with his. The end result of viewing an image is to provoke a specific part of our brain and emotion state to some place it wasn't just before, to end the boredom of the moment, or maybe even to inspire us to something we wouldn't normally try or perform ourselves. Either form of the image can do that.
Each to his own. Keep up the good work, however you do it.

Tom Wiggins
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

For me it does matter if the image is a composite of four separate photos. What counts is the story, the beauty that is portrayed. I like this image. Well done. Tom

Apostolos Spanoudis
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Brilliant imagination and creativity Ceslovas.I suppose part of it is a real photo and the rest digital add-ons and processing.The result is fantastic really eye-catching.My only objection is that the crests of the hills are almost symmetric.Happy the new year.

Philip Coggan
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

A brilliant image. Partly photography, partly not, and who cares? A camera is a tool, not a religion. I love the playfulness of the imagination, and am awe-struck at the skill. Congratulations.

Sumon Mukherjee
WITH DUE RESPECT TO PHOTOGRAPHERS

In my opinion, this is one of the best creative photographs of PN. Congratulations Ceslovas. You have created a real visual pleasure. The snow, the shadows, the man with the line behind him, the blue balloon and the calm blue sky could truly create a “cold, calm, melancholic, joyful” atmosphere of your imagination. This is a wonderful reflection of your idea of “real winter” mixed with four “in camera results”. Thanks for sharing this photograph.

Wishing a truly creative new year for Ceslovas and all, my photographer friends.

Mary Ball
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

MODERATOR NOTE: Some may have forgotten and some might not realize that the only reference to manipulation on the POW forum is to critique the effectiveness/ineffectiveness of the manipulation... Manipulation can be discussed in terms of whether it should have been used or not based on the quality or the result and/or impact etc. etc. etc... NOT weather it is a photo or graphic. NOT if it is worthy or should be a POW or not etc... From here on down, the discussion went way off topic. Much editing and deletions have had to occur. Please read the link above in the Intro by Patrick for the guidelines for this strict critique forum. Thanks.

Erlend Mørk
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

With the mentalities expressed here and elsewhere I really think this is something to strive for: To keep the manipulation subtle/inevident enough to not let the viewer settle on wether it is "real" or "not". When you manage to make and keep people frustrated like this, I think you are on to greatness. But as a good illusionist you should keep your head cool and not give yourself away like this afterwards.. I really did, but I actually didn't want to know how you made it.

regards,
Erlend

Lex Linghorn
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Great image. It works for me. I think it would also work in B&W and this would solve the colour inconsistencies between the photographs.

Eduardo Agustin Carrasco
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

hola, i think is a wonderful work , the compotition is perfect, the colors too very god work congratulations

aiven Huang
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Wonderful work, Ceslovas. I love the picture. The combination of people,snow,mountains. trees and the balloon creates a world of fairy tale. The place I live rarely has snow. I was wondering if the trees should have snow on them in such weather in your picture?

Anders Hingel
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Now that we are back to a discussion of the POW thanks to the timely intervention of Marry, I agree with those that have expressed their admiration of the technical photographical work of Ceslovas. What mainly counts must however in my eyes be the final product: the image that we are invited to appreciate. As I have mentioned earlier I don't find the scene very interesting although the individual parts are indeed beautiful.
What hurts my eye is the composition. In some way the position of the back figure is either too advance in the scene or too little advanced. My own preference would have been a position after the row of trees (and the cutting away one third of the foreground).
What I especially dislike is the overdone introduction of a blue balloon. The funny title and the man entering a dream landscape would have been sufficient.
This of course fully subjective and therefor does not indicate that Ceslovas made objectively bad choices.

Buck George
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

I like the surrealist take. It reminds me of Andre Kertesz's "Washington Square" with a Jerry Uelsmann flavor and, in a broader sense, of Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants."

kathryn stella
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

This is a very striking surrealist photomanip. I'm awed by the seamless incorporation of it's elements and the very definite statement they make.

The composition is centered but not too much so. The third tree on the right works to keep the image from being symmetrical and static. I like the contrast of the central character although he is a bit cliché with the balloon. It's a common motif in a lot of surrealist art but at the same time I like it when someone can take cliché and use it to poke fun, which is what this seems to do whether intended or not.

Very strong image.

Anders Hingel
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Kathryn, my point is that Ceslovas does not need clichés like the blue balloon to make a strong image. Look at some of his other remarkable images. Without such clichés he would have shown strength and independence as an artist - instead of making something that looks like a somewhat cheap pastiche.

Ceslovas Cesnakevicius
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Kathryn, Anders-
Blue balloon for me is an element linking the picture with childhood

Ceslovas Cesnakevicius
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Thank you everyone once again! This was a very useful experience

Jan Kucera
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Hi Ceslovas,
congratulations on the POW. For me, I have had no doubts this image is unreal since first I saw it. This is what does not work for me: the shadows - man's one is very different than the ones of trees as already pointed by some people; the hills - I feel the more distanced hills (particularly the three in the middle) should not be that bright (and perhaps sharp) as the foreground ones (I don't see problem in color differences); and what was the first, most catchy and obvious thing for me is the snow cover - it is identical on the left foreground hill and the middle one (and other ones too).
Hope this helps, and wish you a good light in the new year!
Jan

Kristina Kraft
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

This is such a joyful surrealistic photo. Technically, it is done simply perfect. From the perspective of idea, I simply see a character from one of the Tom Hanks movies. (His characters often had a strange way of living. )

Katherine Michael
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

I saw this image a while back in the daily sampling and it caught my eye then. I like many things about it. The colors are clean and crisp. It has an amazing spaciousness that I love. The perspective is powerful and it is definitely a surreal landscape. I find that the shadows of the man and the leaning tree being a different angle from the shadows of the other trees bothers me a little bit, but not enough to change my opinon of the image. I don't personally like the ballon, but I did see an explanation of why it was included and it makes sense to me now.

I don't feel that I can really comment more on the PP because I am not very experienced in that sort of work. I do want to say that the feeling that I get from this image is that it is representative of a dream, a fragment of Ceslovas' mind if you will. That creates a sense of connection in a way and I have great resepct for him in sharing his work with us. When we take up our cameras and create images, regardless of the methods we choose, we leave a part of us in those images. They are very personal in many ways and to share them with the world requires a certain courage. I like this image not for it's technical details or how it was made, but for the feelings and the thoughts that it evokes.

Katherine

Art Xanthopoulos
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

First of all I congratulate you Ceslovas for making it to POW. Secondly, I congratulate you on your photo editing skills, which I'm sure are the envy of many in PN. Thirdly, I challenge anyone who finds this image unworthy of POW due to it's manipulation in post production to look at their own portfolios and find where the balance between post production manipulation and un-manipulated images leans. Fourthly, to imply that image manipulation , no matter how great or small, somehow cheapens its photographic brilliance or takes away from the photographer's photographic ability implies a level of ignorance and cynicism. Ceslovas, you have done a remarkable job here. Well done

Marc G.
An image about imagery...?

I find the manipulation here very effective. Well done too... I like this little fantasy world that you have set up. It brought a smile to my lips, and then I started thinking, that this image was in fact a cute and smart portrayal of image manipulations, precisely. The man holding the baloons seems indeed to be walking in an all-pure and tidy world. No sharp edges on the hills, no problems, no boundaries, just an absolute freedom to find his own way, bringing his favorite colors along...:-) Like a modern "Alice in Wonderland"... Fun and smart... Nice ! Congrats.

Peter Smith
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

It is an "image" but not a "photograph". When we lose sight of the difference we have ignored art in favor of a work ethic. Neither is to be criticized but differentiated. All of us could have created this image in PS but none of us could have captured it in a PHOTO which is the title of the contest. We can do better than this.

Andrew Gilchrist
Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

@Peter Smith: The POW is explicitly NOT a contest , and while in my personal lexicon this isn't a photograph either, it doesn't in any way make it less art- or discussion-worthy. Perhaps the forum should be "Picture of the Week" instead, but I think the ground rules have already been laid out pretty clearly here. I don't think all of us could have created this image in PS--it is from Ceslovas' imagination and he implemented it with unusual skill. It has been differentiated--it has clearly been presented as a manipulation and the elves/mods have repeatedly asked that the discussion focus on the quality and application of manipulation and not on whether or not it belongs here.

As for a critique on the posted image, it is beautiful, no doubt, and is a wonderful concept. If there's anything for me to criticize it would be that I'd like to see the more distant hills fade more, blend into the horizon with a little more haze. The shadow cast by the man appears to be a little bit too crisp and dark in comparison to the shadows cast by the trees. And composition-wise, I feel like I wish the trees weren't in quite so straight a line.

Joe Jackson
Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

C'est la phartage, oui...? Non...?

jorge fernandez
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Snow always makes me want to be there and it tramsport me to a place of peace and tranquility. El glovito azul is a touch of awereness. Remind me of the pink touch by Spilberg in the list movie. Bravo!!!

jorge fernandez
Response to Visiting winter by Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Snow always makes me want to be there and it tramsport me to a place of peace and tranquility. El glovito azul is a touch of awereness. Reminds me of the pink touch by Spilberg in the list movie. Bravo!!!

Ceslovas Cesnakevicius
Visiting winter Thank you for watching

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