The Wind (II)

by Miguez Macho Carlos

the wind ii seeking critique miguez macho carlos

Gallery: Street

Tags: seeking critique

Category: Street

Published: Wednesday 11th of August 2010 09:05:29 PM


Comments

Catherine Pahou

... Exceptional

Richard Ramirez

Magnifica composicion y tratamiento, carlos.

Cordial saludo

Svetlana Korolyova

Wonderful shot!

bobbiie browne

Carlos... super... like a fairy tale..BB

Ray Brizzi

Wonderful! Great capture of the textures in the cape blowing. Nice contrast against the light colored stones too.

Vadim Arshavsky

Marvelous shot, a true street photography classics! 7/7 and best regards, VA.

Sid Sidney

You got everything right on this one - composition, patterns, tones - all excellent. The wind, her holding her hat, and the walking stick and make this a great photo.

Maurizio Guarino

Excellent work!

wim puts

I like it.

Special the composition is very good.

Robin Hall

I especially like the feeling that her long, arduous journey is almost at an end. Where the roads converge ahead is her ultimate destination.

V Moore
Well done

What a marvelous sculpture this would make, The Perseverance of Age.

The photo is wonderfully evocative of the experience of the woman. Perhaps the photo might have been better cropped with the woman just off center to the left but it holds my interest just as it is. Thank you.

Janet West
Eerie and timeless

  I liked this photo, even though I don't usually like B&W.

  To me, it's the kind of picture that draws you in - what's the story behind this? 

  The fact that there's virtually no shadow cast, and the tightly cropped picture almost makes the background appear to be two-dimensional. This clearly wouldn't work the same in a color photo of the same subject. This person also seems to be isolated, because of the lack of other people or animals.

  Because the feet are set at an angle to suggest bracing the body against the wind, it also conveys to me a sense of motion (along with the cape in the wind). It seems to be a point of decision or a pause - is she waiting for the wind to die down before taking another step? Is she deciding to maybe turn around (to her right)? This can indicate the motion within the mind, more than the struggle against the wind.

Kinda like King Lear, in the storm scene, "....Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow! You cataracts and hurricanes, spout till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks!..." 

(Okay, maybe that's a bit over the top...)

And, oh yes, I also see the 'chicken' (but I do have to squint....)

 

Alan Robertson

Nive image! I would love to have seen this slightly zoomed out and panoramic with more of the two paths on show - it would have made it more dramatic.

Anton Harding
Titling

This frame is one of two featuring the same character from a category 'Street'. It is a welcome reminder for me of the beauty of nature as much as the awe in the labour that's shaping that nature. How clear of crap those stones are here. Lovely to see it!

Piero Cornaglia

Complimenti: che bella foto! E' equilibrata e fa "vedere" bene il vento.

Se vuoi, prova a tagliare un po' sulla destra, potrebbe migliorare l'effetto dinamico.

Fer Chestnutgrove
Excelente

Excelente foto, te invita a crear una historia, y cualquiera es valida. Felicitaciones.

Frank Sines
Frank Sines

Excellent scene and capture. Well done. FS

Patrick Hudepohl
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Please note the following:

Michael Axel
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

What an appropriate image, given the end of October. I like it very much, as it is strong, visually, and great texture.

John A
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Anyone else see a profile of a chicken in this figure? Maybe it is just me............

In any case, when I first saw this image, I was kind of hoping for something more than it has given me.

There are a lot of ways to handle overall tonality in a print and here, while there is good detail throughout, a decision was made (and probably a good one) to keep the whites a little depressed. The blacks have some good detail in them, but I do feel that there is some clarity, or flattening, of the image where I think there could be more depth. After a few minutes trying to figure this out, I think it has much to do with the slight green cast in the image. The color is not much different than one would see with some b/w papers before selenium toning, which was many times used specifically to remove this byproduct of development. Of course, the longer lens used here (and crop into the image) flattens the image as well, but in a different way than does this color effect--which is more internal to the image than the flattening of the picture plane by the optics.

This all may have made some difference, but what I found for myself was that the image just seems to be very static and frozen. The person being centered in the square frame, both of which generally work to solidify a subject, seems to counter any movement the bracing against the wind might have introduced. There doesn't seem to be any action here or mystery introduced, except maybe the clothing. The stone plaza sort of takes away that mystery, as we know this is an old world setting and maybe have come to expect more exotic wear in these sorts of images.

I guess what I am saying, bottom line, is that the image just doesn't take me anywhere and I feel stuck in the middle with this person. It feels a bit like an opportunity lost as there must have been a more dynamic and interesting image than this with this subject, the wind and the location.

Craig Dickson
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Very nice, very expressive. The two path-like areas of larger blocks keep the ground from seeming too monotonous and provide a horizontal and a diagonal to balance the vertical figure and the near-vertical diagonal of the walking stick. The deep focus and telephoto perspective work well. The tones and textures are very nice too, with the dark figure standing out against the light stones. The wind-blown cloak and the hand holding onto the hat really make the image.

Anne S
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

It's remarkable how well something beyond the visual is communicated through this image- namely the bracing and seemingly cold force of the wind against this lonely and frail figure. I think the tones are very good as well - communicating contrast of fluidity of the cape and hat against the unmoving firmness of the earth. The details of composition - including the akimbo feet showing effort to even stand and the hand holding the hat as well as the walking stick are really superb.

Charles Beddoe
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I feel that a slower shutter speed, allowing the cloak to blur a bit, may have made a stronger image.

Gordon JB
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

My first thought upon opening this image was to wonder how many hundreds of times I have seen similar images of semi-silhouetted lone figures photographed from above while crossing cobblestone roads. I suppose that the element of wind is a bit of a twist however as has already been noted the shutter speed chosen pretty much sucked the life out of that breeze, leaving it static and boring. The light does nothing to elevate the image above the mundane subject matter. The B&W conversion is drab and lifeless. The greatest let down in this photo is the awkward composition. If one is going to go for a cliche subject then one may as well go all the way and conform to the cliche composition for this type of photo. John summed up my opinion of the structure of this photo succinctly so I will borrow his words here " there must have been a more dynamic and interesting image than this with this subject, the wind and the location." .

Catherine Pahou
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Well..when I saw this photo I was amazed. The fact that you can barely see any shadow, the long black clothes and the hat covering any human detail. The air, the emptiness of the picture, the empty space accompanying the figure, they are elements that allow the photograph to be, according to ones thought, transformed from something very human to an element of fiction. To me the absence of intense photographic elements (such as the light/contrast that would affect the shadow), conspire in order to give a photograph of pliable interpretations. I very much like it.

Ken Thalheimer
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

John A. I also saw the chicken profile, as well. I like the shot & tonality. It really needs no title. It stands pretty much on it's own in teling a story.
I think I would have her off-center in the frame. Centering sometimes works. I'm not sure it does here

Alberta P.
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I downloaded the large size from the original post in August, used PhotoShop's Auto Tone, Auto Contrast and Auto Color and removed the black frame. The result is a slightly improved but still rather predictable capture. At least without the border, the road and chicken lady's path is unending lending a bit of mystery.

Charles Carstensen
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Composition is perfect. Contrast and exposure are excellent. Good eye.

Joey Tranchina
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

This is lovely. My first impulse is just to say "Thank you." for bringing something so beautiful into my life. Strong and complex; the textures are spectacular.
When I step back to look at it critically, I think that it might be possible to wring a little more richness out of the tonal range. I see that when I look at many of my images, but, as I am relatively new to digital photography, I can not say how to do that. On paper, i would try running the print through a very dilute selenium toner... Maybe someone here can make some suggestions... jt

Colin Houlden
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

The vibrancy of colour can, at times, actually detract from the desired photographic effect. The subtle effects of texture and lighting that can be lost in colour photographs stand out in this black and white photograph by Carlos Miguez Macho, [I would like to guess, of a pilgrim approaching the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela]. The picture captures the moment beautifully.
Colin507

Saad Salem
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

John A.
There doesn't seem to be any action here or mystery introduced, except maybe the clothing.
 
At very first glance at the image I asked Where is the Cauldron ??
I have clicked the photo from the link of photo.net newsletter.
then I read the title and looked again to see that the atmosphere is so very different from the witch house,it is a street image in a windy day,yet with a costume of a witch and even with a stick ,that I mistaken at my first glance for a flying brush.But the Good news for me it is a street image ,and now have to figure what she is doing,looking at the image enlarged and found that the lady is just having her left hand over her hat preventing it from going with the wind and that had made for me all the difference in my view of looking at this image,this is a decisive moment that have been captured with the surrounding atmosphere and in a good looking street too,and I agree that her action of being preventing her hat of flying with the wind is somewhat not very obvious,the hand have a similar tone with that of the background,but it is very clear in the enlarged version,and having another indicative sign,the hat is being flipped back from the front backwards,and it seems to me that Carlos have captured the image a second or two after she have hit her hat.
And I do not care if it is off centred or not,taken from the ground level or above,though the image may be looked much better from an another perspective ,the most important thing for a street photographer is to catch the moment and I think confidently Carlos have did it successfully from a very difficult point of view,.
All other elements of the image are supplementary and enhancing,from the waves the winds have inflicted in her coat to the tones and lines of the street,the only thing that I think it could be done better is the grey conversion which could be done better without that very subtle greenish tint.
 

David Sherjan
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Yes I like this one Carlos.

DSP

Anuar Patjane
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

The story behind the character is what makes this image work and it is the reason why the image becomes atractive. But in my opinion the quality of the image and by that I mean overall composition, sharpness, b&w conversion method, DOF and dinamic range, its just average. In this kind of images the quality of the work becomes a secundary aspect because the scene is so timeless and emotional. Nice work.

Andrew Meszaros
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

This is one of those shots where you don't even think about the technical aspect of the image. The narrative content takes care of everything.

Jeremy Jackson
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

The Elves: "Before writing a contribution to this thread, please consider our reason for having this forum: to help people learn about photography."

So, what have we learned?
1) The composition is good, the composition is not good.
2) The tonality is a problem, the tonality is not a problem.
3) There is no mystery, there is mystery.
4) I like it, I don't like it.

Take a look at: "http://theonlinephotographer.blogspot.com/2006/06/great-photographers-on-internet.html"....for a hilarious take on opinion in art. Have we learned that all there is is opinion?
Having said that, I just want to recognize John A for his thoughtful, educated and enlightened opinions. John always seems to say what I am feeling but incapable of articulating. In this case again John, I think you did a masterful job.

So, in my opinion,....what John said! :-) Best, JJ

Ray House
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

First thing I noticed while looking over this POW is the cloning of the upper stones. Not very well done and I lost interest quickly after seeing this.

Bobby Karimipoor
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Beautiful street job.I really like the details and POW.Unique b&w shot and the camera angle was nice,also.
The most important point is the eyes to find this scene.

Regards(Bobby).

Stephen Penland
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

The story told to me by this photo (which, to me, is relatively rare and therefore not a cliche at all) quickly became more important than any technical aspects of the photo. In this sense, my initial reaction was like that expressed by Anuar and Andrew. A lone figure, clutching the cap with left hand while the cape goes flying in the wind, leaning on a long cane for support, the feet not moving but rather braced on the cobblestones, the centered composition so that emphasis is given to the lone figure, and no other organic element in the frame -- it's just the vicissitudes faced by a person struggling against elements of nature represented by the rough cobblestones, unrelenting wind, and presumably aging body. Whether on a personal level or symbolically representing a condition of life, I could immediately relate to the story being told. Any other technical aspect is secondary and, IMO, trivial to the universality of the theme captured by Carlos.

Twice I've dealt with the prospect of death in the very immediate future. The fact that I first saw this photo on my laptop while in the waiting room of a physician's office to consult about a third prospect gave me a mindset, I suppose, to view Carlos' image in a certain way. The mental image I've formed that has helped me accept these prospects is that of standing on the top of a high mountain with hundreds of other mountains stretching to the horizon in all directions. A very strong and steady wind is blowing from the southwest, coming from the across the Pacific Ocean, extending for miles above, for miles on every side, and down to the deep valleys below. The immensity of the wind is staggering. So I take a deep breath, face into the wind, and with all the effort I can muster I blow into the wind to get it to stop. Such is the futility.

I had formed a mental image of the struggle against an oncoming wind that predisposed me to immediately see a story in Carlos' photograph. Not everyone has shared my experiences, so our initial views of the photograph are going to be based on different frames of mind. We usually accept the present moment or our present condition as that which will extend indefinitely, and the possibility that things could or will be very different for us is far removed from our thinking. We interact with life and, for photographers, with photographs based on this view. That we have different experiences and different views is very evident by the diversity of reactions expressed regarding the POW. Some focus on the technical aspects that could be different or improved to present a more appealing photograph, one person even was immediately struck by cloned cobblestones (which even when I try, I cannot find, and the gulf between that person's view and my own to Carlos' photograph boggles the mind), and still others see more universal stories. So Carlos, who made the photograph for his own reasons, gets it from many different angles. John A's comment left me smiling when last week he suggested that rather than receiving a gold cup, the POW recipient should instead receive a purple heart. We simply come at photography from many different directions and for many different purposes, and the poor POW recipient, who wasn't even asked or warned that he or she was about to be scrutinized for a week, is left in the middle, taking it from all sides. But it's just an aspect of photography and part of participating with a group of like-minded individuals, and all of it, even the criticisms, can give us immense pleasure if we allow (though it's not always easy). Thanks to Carlos for the POW, which I found to be a wonderful illustration.

Ray House
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Stephen, the stones I referred to are just to the right and above the persons head. When I saw those I was immediatly reminded of last weeks POW, that probably isn't fair in a discussion of this weeks POW...it is just my experience.

John A
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I think the cloning actually is pretty good except in one area to the right of the main work, where the stonework becomes somewhat nebulous. (by the way, it is the large, vertical paver above the head and the area right above that and it was taken from the upper left of the image--1st large vertical paver at top of that diagonal area) The problem with it is that it is too exact a "copy" of a rather large and distinct area. It is always better to take a little from here and there and combine them to create something new and different. But the homogenous nature of the stone here sort of hides it from first look.

Knowing this is here does detract a bit, but it isn't, obviously, very noticeable and I don't find it affects the basic quality of the image--although it should be worked on a bit more. For me, I wonder what might have been there in the original and if it might have added the counter point this image is in need of, sometimes we don't make the right decisions in these sorts of things...and sometimes we do.

Mike Mancil
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I'm not a frequent poster to the POW because I tend to view photographs much more emotive than technical. However, I (sometimes) enjoy reading the comments of the more technically inclined members. In this case I find the image interesting and somewhat reminiscent of either a "Harry Potter" character or a hood ornament and very well presented, in spite of the slip with the cloning. I do, though, find in all the comments references to either a female subject or a generic person.... Uh, am I the only one to see the beard and the quite manly stance? All in all a well done photograph. Congratulations to Carlos... Mike

Stephen Penland
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Yes, now I see the cloning. Either some of us have very good eyes or one of us has very bad eyes (or both!). And Michael, I was one of probably many who tried to remain gender neutral because I wasn't sure if the "figure" was male or female; I can see what resembles a beard, but I can't be certain it is a beard (although I think you're probably right).

Stephen Penland
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Ray, I think one reason why you saw the cloning and I didn't is that we (and many if not most other vertebrates, and perhaps invertebrates) form search images in our minds that greatly facilitate finding things of interest, such as food. If you're tuned into cloning patterns, you're much more likely to find them than someone who is not tuned in. You were probably primed by last week's POW, while I was struck by something entirely different, so our mindsets regarding what we "wanted" to see in this photo were different. People are really, really complex, which is why these discussions can be so enjoyable, educational, and sometimes frustrating! If and when I clone something like this, I do what John A suggests and take bits and pieces from different places to create something that doesn't really exist elsewhere.

terry stormon
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Well my first reaction after reading other responses was; thank goodness Gordon B does not get to appraise my photos! I like it and the contrast & mystery evokes days gone by.

Gordon JB
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I did not notice the cloning initially, in part because the image itself does not warrant deep inspection. My eye went from generic figure to generic road to wind day to Drab PP -- finished-- outta here. This being the type of image that warrants no more than a few seconds of viewing also explains why few people noticed or even cared about the gender of the subject.
Once I was alerted to the cloning by Ray it did add another negative to the already less than stellar PP work on this photo and it now jumps off the screen making me wonder how I could have missed it initially. As Stephen points out, people and their perception are complex. I cannot agree with John that the cloning is "pretty good" unless "pretty", as a qualifier in this case, means not very. The borders of the cloned area are smudgy and obvious, the vertical crack in the adjacent paver is significantly misaligned and the entire middle paver is a duplicate of another paver in the photo. There was not even an attempt to snip a few pieces out of the cloned paver or move some details around to disguise the redundancy. If the cloning is this apparent at 680 pixel width, it would jump out and bite you on the backside in a decent sized print.

Gordon JB
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

In my previous post I wrote vertical when I meant to write horizontal.

John A
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Some good points Gordon. In fact, looking back at the image after your comments, I see cloning in places I didn't yesterday and may be the areas you are talking about. I wouldn't ascribe the "pretty good" moniker to those areas, the ones in front of the figure.

I know there are different biases regarding cloning and how much, or little, is ok. Although I consider myself a relative purest, I learned long ago that we are creating visuals to communicate something more than what is in the frame and removing detritus can be part of that. Had this been done well, I would be fine with it, I am just not sure that this image would be worth the effort to do it--and I still wonder if what was removed might have actually made the image better-probably because it isn't doing anything for me as it is.

Gordon JB
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

John, I consider myself somewhat of a purist as regards manipulation at least in as far as my own work is concerned. However I always maintain that this is a visual statement we are making and whatever works to further the photographers vision is fine with me, provided that it is done well. I will not hesitate to clone out a cigarette butt on the sidewalk if it is a distraction and it would not bother me that Carlos cloned out several objects, some as large as a cat judging by the area involved, had it been done with care. Cloning like dodging or burning or any other manipulation for that matter, works in most instances when you do not notice it or when it is subtle enough to be secondary. In this case it is neither subtle nor well done and that is my only objection.

Peter Hung
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Very simple in terms of composition and it doesn't quite meet the requirements for Rule of Thirds but works very well IMO. I like the fact that there is a simple background and a strong subject captured in the frame. It goes to show that a photograph of a single subject can be so striking.
I think this image works well because it is in Black and White and would even say that it wouldn't give the same emotional response if it was in colour.
Overall I really enjoyed this week's picture and just would like to say "Good Job!!"

Charles Carstensen
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

The rule of thirds is really not a rule to be followed in each and every case. It does not apply to this shot. This photo is a Rodney Smith image except for the fuzzyness. Rodney Smith is one outstanding photographer.

Stephen Penland
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

It should be called the "guidance of thirds" rather than a rule. It's good guidance because it very often improves the aesthetics of an image, but not in all cases. I don't think it works here for my own personal reasons that I described earlier.

Charles Carstensen
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Hi, Stephen. Good point, food for thought. I believe the term "rule of thirds" comes from the pure definition of the Golden Proportion which is also called The Golden Mean, Golden Ratio, 1.618. It originates with the Fibonacci numbers. It is such an old phrase and concept that it is just ingrained with we photographers. I try to find a way to use Fibonacci numbers in my photography. As an aside, I am a cancer survivor, too. Going through it certainly does change your outlook on life. Thanks,

John A
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I have to say that I have issues with the way photographers throw around the "rule of thirds". The first issue is that most of the time it is presented as if it were a rule or "requirements for Rule of Thirds" as Charles originally presented it. As if somehow an image suffers because it isn't properly employed. In fact, I am reluctant to even call it a guideline as it is really a short hand for one of the many visual principles and probably not even the best shorthand at that. As with all of the principles and elements of design, an understanding of what they are about and how they affect a visual is to understand how to use them, or abuse them, to serve the intent of any image, not requirements that an image must serve.

Certainly, having the "guidelines" can assist someone beginning, however, for real understanding and growth to take place one needs to understand more than a "rule" or two.

Piero Cornaglia
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

The picture is very nice, well-contrasted with its own logic and clear. The main character is certainly the wind that moves the central figure.
The square format, however, hampers the dynamism of the whole. I think a more accurate cut on the right would improve the effect.
I tried this, and keeping the square format, is trying to shape: this is the effect

Piero Cornaglia
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

The picture is very nice, well-contrasted with its own logic and clear. The main character is certainly the wind that moves the central figure.
The square format, however, hampers the dynamism of the whole. I think a more accurate cut on the right would improve the effect.
I tried this, and keeping the square format, is trying to shape: this is the effect

Museeb Jasim
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I was the first to mention here, that the image been centered, in fact, the clearance on the left shows more than the clearance to the right.

Mr. Rashed

For me, I don't understand the intention of your above phrase, Whether you mean the image is centered or it is off center. Anyhow Mr. John A. was very clear when he said " the image just seems to be very static and frozen." of course if the Rule Of Third has been used or not.

Mac Moss
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Certainly there is a place for analysis and open discussion, but there is altogether too much analysis here IMHO, and also some extraordinarily ungentlemanly combat (and some comments that should have been deleted).

The photograph itself really doesn't care about whether people are arguing about whether the elements are precisely in alignment according to explicit or imagined rules. It's like arguing about whether or why Beethoven, Mozart, and Haydn all violated the structure of sonata form (as they did, often). The music is still sublime.

Personally, yes, I know all the rules, but here I just love the thrill of appreciating a fine photo. It's an example of why street photography, like other genres, is worth pursuing as an art form for its own sake.

Bravo to Carlos for finding, capturing, and submitting this.

Piero Cornaglia
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Mac Moss, you are certainly right in saying that the photo is emotion, beyond the rules. I think as you. However, having opened a discussion on that picture, it seemed right also highlight that point of view, while appreciating that much shooting.
In addition, I write bad English, I did not want to be rude.
Bravo Carlos, la tua foto è splendida!

Rumen Kocev
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

It likes frame but personally i had boosted the a little bit main figure

Dara P.
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Photograph was taken in a moment in time....well composed ...regards

Eduardo Agustin Carrasco
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

very nice capture, good compotition

terry stormon
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

I too cannot understand why the degrading comments & foul language were allowed to air

Fred G
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

"here I just love the thrill of appreciating a fine photo"

Then you're not thinking critically and shouldn't be disappointed that others are in a forum set up to do so.

Others are speaking to why they don't get a thrill of appreciating when looking at this. And they are able to articulate those reasons. You are relying on the subjectivity of thrill, which is often simply vapid, an excuse not to dig a little deeper. I know, I know, art needs no words . . . NOT.

In every good music class I've been in, we've discussed specifically in what ways Mozart, Beethoven, and Haydn broke the forms they broke.

Of course, people think of the "rule" of thirds as they do the sonata form, which is a mistake. Classical musicians were often not only guided by but restricted to the forms in which they wrote. They were writing for kings, princes, and churches who were paying them to fulfill expectations in many cases. Forms were structures which few were brave or creative enough to break. The rule of thirds is not such a form.

There is entirely too much dwelling on the rule of thirds in this thread for my taste but there is not too much critical thought. And swooning isn't persuasive.

Carlos Miguez Macho
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

(Sorry for my bad, bad english...)
I have read with a lot care, and internal gratitude, all comments. I am not going to advert directly to none in particular, but I would like to express my comment on my own photo; logically, I will take into account several of things that have been said here.
When I published this photo in August, it had already at that time a significant positive reaction between some that they saw it. In Photo.net, that is sign of that the photo constitutes an image in which is possible to see some type of aesthetic universal. Obviously, this is something that has been seen confirmed for its choice as a photo of the week ("it is interesting and worthy of discussion").
From my point of view, the essential in this photo is that the man, dress that way and alone, allows creating, thanks to the action of the wind on the layer (that it is which it indicates that there is wind), an intemporal image that quickly we can identify with concepts as a resistance before adversities, etc.
I want to say: for me, the value of the photo is in its skills to symbolise an idea, a concept. Beyond that, it does not be a lot more. I am very little one interested in the processing of the images with computer programs, and I do not usually touch photos more than as for very basic parameters, simply until the colour, tone, glow, contrast, etc. they are of my taste. Without more.
However, I am enough worried for the frame and the distribution of the elements in the interior of the photo. In this case, above all, I fretted of centring to the man, because is him, and nothing nor nobody more, to which it is necessary to watch. In addition, I tried also that borders of stone that they fall in diagonal came together in him, with the intention of strengthening the dynamism of the image and to accompany the movement of the layer.
Apart from that, I did not retouch anything in the figure of the man (nor I removed nor I added): I made three photos of the moment, and this is that which chose finally for the willingness of the layer and of the hand in the head.
As I said in the beginning, I have read all your comments. I thank them and I expect to have them in account in my next photos.

Stephen Penland
The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Carlos, thanks very much for your explanation of your own image -- what it means to you and the message you want to say with the photo. My own interpretation is very similar to yours. That is neither good nor bad; we simply saw the same (or similar) story in the photo. I've enjoyed and appreciated the discussion that has centered around your photo this week.

Emma Lillypad
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Love the concept, but the composition doesnt seem right to me, too square perhaps?

Emma

Ananda Chaudhuri
Response to The Wind (II) by Carlos Miguez Macho

Great detail and great work....no mistaking the wind in the picture. The unique texture of the paved ground provices great contrast for the form in black. Detail is excellent.
I would have positioned the figure at slightly more to lower left corner and would have darkened the corners a bit.

Carlos Miguez Macho
The Wind (II) .

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