Canon EOS 7D Preview

As had been widely rumored, Canon announced the EOS 7D today (September 1, 2009). Positioned between the current EOS 50D and the EOS 5D MkII, the EOS 7D has an 18MP APS-C crop sensor, full HD video capability at 1920 × 1080 resolution with selectable frame rates of 24p, 25p or 30p, a new multi-axis cross-type 19-zone AF system, an 8 fps continuous shooting rate, a shutter rated for 150,000 cycles and ISO range expandable to 12,800.

The sensor is a new design with greater efficiency, which may compensate for the smaller pixels in terms of noise performance. At 18MP, the EOS 7D is the current “pixel champion” for the crop sensor format. The EOS 7D also has a new metering system, the Focus Color Luminance metering system (iFCL), which measures focus, color and luminance across 63 zones, keeping exposure levels stable even as the light source changes.

Another new feature added, Canon EOS 7D’s pop-up flash features a built-in Integrated Speedlite Transmitter for controlling off-camera EOS Speedlites without the need for an external transmitter.

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The 7D represents a new model in the Canon lineup. It does not replace the 50D and at some future point I’d expect to see a 60D (with video) released. The price ($1700) makes it about $1000 less expensive then the full frame EOS 5D MkII and about $600 more than the EOS 5D. In terms of price and features it seem to be a competitor for Nikon’s D300S ($1800), but with a significantly higher pixel count (18MP vs. 12MP) and higher resolution video (1080p vs. 780p).

Obviously, I can’t comment on the performance of the new sensor and AF system at this point, but photo.net will be running a complete review as soon as we can obtain a production sample. On paper the 7D looks like a very capable camera and Canon rarely disappoints. I hope I can get my hands on one soon!

Where to Buy

Photo.net’s partners have the Canon EOS 7D available in the following options. Even better, your purchase helps to support photo.net.

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Here’s the Canon press release:

Lake Success, N.Y., September 1, 2009 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, today introduced a revolutionary camera that redefines the highly competitive mid-range DSLR product category: the Canon EOS 7D Digital SLR camera. Professional photographers and advanced amateurs have been demanding higher performance and more diverse functions in their cameras, and Canon has answered with the new EOS 7D. Far more than a slight improvement from a previous model, the EOS 7D DSLR is a brand new product that stands on its own with new features never before seen in any Canon camera. Whether it’s shooting at eight frames per second (fps), focusing with the new Zone AF mode or recording 24p Full HD video, the EOS 7D DSLR camera satisfies the most rigorous professional requirements with durability, flexibility, high-resolution images and customizable controls. With its unprecedented out-of-the-box performance and high-end feature set, the EOS 7D is poised as the ultimate step-up camera for serious photographers or a second camera for professionals in the field.

The EOS 7D boasts significant EOS advancements including a completely new 19-point Autofocus system, a new Canon iFCL Metering System (Intelligent Focus, Color, Luminance) and a new Intelligent Viewfinder. An 18-megapixel Canon CMOS sensor and Dual DIGIC 4 Imaging Processors fuel the EOS 7D’s 14-bit A/D data conversion and its ability to freeze fast motion in high-resolution with eight fps continuous shooting up to 126 Large JPEGS using a UDMA CF card, positioning this camera for the studio as well as the sideline. The EOS 7D captures beautiful low-light images with or without a flash, at occasions such as a dance recital or wedding reception, thanks to a wide range of ISO speed settings from 100-6400 (expandable to 12,800). In addition to its new still capture capabilities, the EOS 7D features Full HD video capture at 1920 × 1080 resolution with selectable frame rates of 24p, 25p or 30p. Native 24p recording helps videographers achieve a more cinema-style look for their footage without the need for post-processing.

“The EOS 7D represents a completely new chapter in digital photography and Canon product development. This camera stands alone as the most functional and innovative DSLR Canon has released to-date, bringing together all of the best professional features offered, along with numerous user requests at a price-point everyone can appreciate,” stated Yuichi Ishizuka, senior vice president and general manager, Consumer Imaging Group, Canon U.S.A.

The Evolution of Vision, the EOS 7D’s New Autofocus System
The Canon EOS 7D boasts the most advanced AF system ever seen in an EOS SLR. The completely re-designed system includes a new multi-axis cross-type 19-point AF grid, where the focusing points are evenly spread out across the image plane and clearly displayed through Canon’s new Intelligent Viewfinder. All 19 points are f/5.6-sensitive for both horizontal and vertical cross-type focusing, while the center AF point adds high-precision diagonal cross-type sensitivity for f/2.8 and larger aperture lenses. The Canon EOS 7D Digital SLR camera is the first EOS SLR to feature 19 cross-type focusing points that remain fully functional with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6, which brings the performance of the AF system to unprecedented levels for assignments as varied as fast-moving sports action or low-light wedding ceremonies.

The Canon EOS 7D’s AF system allows numerous AF area selection modes never seen before in an EOS SLR camera. New modes include:

  • Spot AF mode reduces the size of a single AF point to focus on small subjects like an animal in a cage.

  • AF Point Expansion mode uses a cluster of AF points adjacent to the selected AF point to automatically assist focusing on moving subjects, such as an athlete on the run.
  • Zone AF divides the 19 AF points into five selectable focusing zones and makes it easier to achieve focus with subjects that are difficult to track with Single Point AF or AF point expansion, such as birds in flight.

Additional AF improvements include a revised Automatic AF point selection sequence that allows a user to pick any one of the 19 AF points as a starting point for tracking moving subjects in AI Servo mode. (Previous EOS models required the subject to first be acquired by the center focusing point.) If the subject moves away, the camera will continue to track the movement with the remaining points and display the active focusing point in the viewfinder. Also, a time-saving feature is AF Point Switching, which allows photographers to select and register one AF point for horizontal compositions and a second AF point for vertical shooting, ideal for studio and portrait photographers.

To complement the new AF system, the exposure metering system for the EOS 7D has been completely re-designed to take color information into account, another first for an EOS system. Canon’s iFCL metering includes a 63-zone dual-layer metering sensor that reads both illumination and color for consistent results in all lighting conditions, keeping exposure levels stable from shot to shot, even as the light source changes.

Canon’s new Intelligent Viewfinder uses a liquid crystal overlay to provide clear and precise displays of focusing points and zones, on-demand grid lines and a spot metering circle. The LCD overlay can also be illuminated in extreme low-light situations or turned off completely. The EOS 7D camera’s viewfinder includes a large all-glass pentaprism with an antireflective coating to maximize clarity and provide a brighter display. The EOS 7D’s Intelligent Viewfinder features 1.0x magnification with 100 percent coverage for accurate composition and checking of detail.

EOS HD Movie: Empowering the World of Videography
Canon has blazed new trails in HD video capture with the 5D Mark II. Now, the EOS 7D takes DSLR video to new heights with Full HD capture featuring fully manual exposure control, and selectable cinematic frame rates for both NTSC (National Television System Committee) and PAL (Phase Altering Line) standards. Compatible with more than 60 Canon EF and EF-S lenses, the EOS 7D lets videographers take full advantage of the camera’s large CMOS sensor to achieve the dramatic frame composition they desire. At the heart of the EOS 7D are two key proprietary Canon technologies, Dual DIGIC 4 Imaging Processors and a large APS-C-sized CMOS sensor, helping to render stunning color reproduction, amazing depth of field and fine detail, even in low-light conditions. The Canon EOS 7D allows for three video recording modes – Full HD and HD in a 16:9 aspect ratio and Standard Definition (SD) in a 4:3 aspect ratio, all at selectable frame rates. The EOS 7D Digital SLR camera will record Full HD at 1920 × 1080 pixels in selectable frame rates of 24p (23.976), 25p, or 30p (29.97); 720p HD recording at 50p or 60p (59.94) and SD video at frame rates of 50p or 60p (59.94). The EOS 7D features a new dedicated button to initiate live view for both video and still shooting. Once engaged, the same dedicated button will start and stop video recording. Like the EOS 5D Mark II, the Canon EOS 7D Digital SLR camera provides users with the capability to use an external stereo microphone for professional audio effects or a built-in monaural microphone for convenience.

The Features You Asked For
A helpful new tool for architectural and landscape photography where angles and perspective are critical is Canon’s new built-in Dual Axis Electronic Level, featuring an artificial horizon over the image on the rear LCD screen in Live View or in the viewfinder using illuminated AF points for easy leveling while shooting. The dual axis electronic level shows both horizontal roll and vertical pitch, making it easy to identify when the camera is in a fixed level shooting position and ready to take the shot.

The EOS 7D’s pop-up flash features a built-in Integrated Speedlite Transmitter for control of multiple off-camera EOS Speedlites without the need for an external transmitter. This built-in wireless option is a compact and economical solution for studio and wedding photography with multiple flash set-ups.

A new Intelligent Macro Tracking function helps reduce blur during macro shooting by recognizing when a macro lens is attached and automatically adjusting the AI Servo sampling frequency. This AI Servo adjustment accounts for camera movement forward and back, a typical occurrence when moving in close for a macro shot as photographers rock back and forth, or a flower blows in the wind.

Once in your hands, you can immediately feel the ergonomic improvements of the Canon EOS 7D camera, starting with a new super-fluid body design with continuous curves outlining the top of the camera and a revised grip that fits better in a user’s hand. The camera has a new Quick Control Button, which opens an easy-to-navigate menu on the camera’s LCD screen. From this menu, users can adjust all camera settings including AF modes as well as set custom button functions, an insightful new feature that can easily customize each button’s function to the photographer’s preference. Another new feature is the RAW/JPEG toggle button providing quick dual-format shooting, allowing photographers to quickly add large JPEG or RAW file formats to their already selected shooting mode at the touch of a button.

The Canon EOS 7D camera also features a new large, clear 3.0-inch solid structure Clear View II LCD screen with 920,000 dot/VGA resolution for enhanced clarity and color when viewing images. The camera’s nine internal seals enhance weather resistance, and its 150,000-cycle shutter durability positions the EOS 7D as a “workhorse” for professionals in any photography discipline.

New Wireless Connectivity
Canon is announcing the availability of the new WFT-E5A wireless file transmitter (WFT) exclusively for the EOS 7D Digital SLR camera. The WFT-E5A wireless transmitter offers professional photographers a wide range of digital connectivity options including IEEE802.11a/b/g and Ethernet, ideal for commercial and studio work. The WFT-E5A wireless file transmitter opens the door to new possibilities in remote and Geotagged shooting applications. Photographers can fire up to 10 cameras simultaneously from across the room or across the country while maintaining control over camera settings and remote live view on a laptop or smart phone.i The WFT-E5A wireless transmitter can also transfer and display images on DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) compatible televisions and photo frames. Geotagging is now possible via Bluetooth, using compatible GPS devices to append coordinate data to the images.

Where to Buy

Photo.net’s partners have the Canon EOS 7D available in the following options. Even better, your purchase helps to support photo.net.

  • canon_eos7d
  • canon_eos7d-kit

Original text ©2009 Bob Atkins.

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    • Great preview. Looking forward to the hands-on review. Happy shooting, Yakim.
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    • Great preview. Looking forward to the review. This might just be my upgrade from my XTi. Until really didn't see much point in upgrading. But with the new bells and whistles on this model..
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    • A lot of useful new technology here, namely the auto-focus system and metering system. The other goodies are nice as well and show that Canon can put some thought into a new camera other than reiterating basically the same stuff for the past few years (30D, 40D, 50D, etc) or releasing technology that's half-assed (e.g., video without auto-focus doesn't seem to be very useful, but maybe that's just me...). The Nikon D3, D700, and D300 spanked Canon into action (even though they have their technical flaws as well), and even on their own videos for the 7D pretty much state in one clip that they missed the boat over the past few years in some regards. Glad to hear that they're responding and giving long-time Canon users something to look forward to. That being said, photo quality is more important to me than any new feature and certainly there are concerns about ramming 18mp onto this sensor, but I'll wait to see the results before drawing any conclusions. This might finally be the Canon gem that justifies me jumping from the 30D to something new, because the 30D has some achilles heels that I'm not happy with. Here's hoping! :-)
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    • The price ($1700) makes it about $1000 less expensive then the full frame EOS 5D MkII and about $600 more than the EOS 5D.

      Did you mean EOS 50D?
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    • Just cannot understand why Canon has used Number 7 (One Digit) for a smaller sized sensor. I wish they had called it 55D or 60D (two digits). Also cannot understand why they have supplied it with 28-135 mm lens instead of 17-85 mm. I wish they would concentrate more on their full frame cameras instead of bringing out these expensive toys which in a way are spoiling their own markets. Though Canon technology is superior, Nikon seems to be more logical in their choice of model numbers and their products too.
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    • I agree thinking of Rustom Havewalla.I cannot understand why canon has used number 7 (One Digit) for a smaller sized sensor.I was waiting as 60D or XXD, like everybody...Also its very expensive as for me.In my opinion, price is between max $1000-$1450 for this body.Because its not full frame !
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    • Canon's move is easy to understand. First, It's possible that Canon is replacing the 17-85 IS by the new 15-85 IS and therefore the 17-85 may not be available soon. They don't want to include the new 15-85 and bring the price up too high. Second, The retail $2600 is the bottom price for a FF SLR at least for a while. Hence there is no need to reserve the Canon 6D or 7D... for lower priced FF SLR. Further, It's possible that we will see the 3D and the 4D in the future especially the 3D that I believe Canon already had in their R&D lab. Finally, they want to make the Canon 7D a different class of the APS-C CMOS Sensor cameras. Retailiing at $1699 is the right price for the 7D. (The Nikon D300 was $1799 and recently $1699 retail.) The new Canon 7D was pre-odered at Amazon on the first day and sold out in less than 4 hours. I predict the 7D will be very hot this coming Chirstmas and the price $1699 will stay for a while just like the Canon 5D Mk II.
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    • i'm not a technical guy but do any of these newer camera's increase dynamic range and is that possible. In addition, is increasing dynamic range important to camera manufacturers?
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    • Putting it another way, the $1700 price makes it $300 less expensive than the full-frame Sony A850. I do not understand why anybody would pay this much for an APS-C camera when you can buy an excellent 4/3 camera for $700, or a 5D (mark 1) for $1900.
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    • Am I the only serious photographer who thinks video is a waste? If I wanted to take video, I would go buy a video camera! My dream? A simple (no live view, no video, switches rather than menu adjustments, no mono/filter/creative settings) full frame Canon built as ruggedly as my 40D for about $1,250. At least Sony is putting the pressure on for lowering full frame prices. Maybe some day ...
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    • Glad to see one more indication that "The Recession" is a hoax. In practical terms getting the shot on the paper- what will these new multi-bucks toys do that the ancient 20D won't?
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    • >> I cannot understand why canon has used number 7 (One Digit) for a smaller sized sensor. For marketing reasons. They wanted another tier in the APS market and they wanted to charge more for it. >> Putting it another way, the $1700 price makes it $300 less expensive than the full-frame Sony A850. I do not understand why anybody would pay this much for an APS-C camera when you can buy an excellent 4/3 camera for $700, or a 5D (mark 1) for $1900. I would, as both the Sony system and 5D do not interest me at all. It's a very nice upgrade to my 40D. Happy shooting, Yakim.
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    • I do not understand why anybody would pay this much for an APS-C camera

      Well let's face it, Nikon's D300 is very popular with Nikon owners and people keep buying the model although there is a Nikon FF (D700)

      So why can't Canon owners have a similar choice.

      Regarding the single digit name, what's the difference if its called 60D, 7D or even 7mega D, a name is there just to define the difference between a model and another. Its the result it produces and the new tools it contains that we should be interested in.

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    • I forgot two things......I would gladly give up some of the megapixels for 1) an external focus assist light....popping up the flash to do this is simply stupid, and 2) geo-tagging. I appreciate the marketing hype behind having the highest mp in this class of camera, but wouldn't the noise reduction effort be better invested with something in the 15mp range? Just make the 15mp look perfect. Canon and Nikon are creating their own noise problems on the APS-C sensors and then spending huge sums on R&D to reduce noise...Instead of just cramming less on the sensor in the first place? Heavy noise reduction will probably always introduce artifacts. Doesn't seem to make much sense to me...
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    • *** Glad to see one more indication that "The Recession" is a hoax *** Uh, right. So was the moon landing. And I'm not sure Eskimos are real either.
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    • 1. APS is a common name for cropped sensor. 1.6/1.5 are also called APS-C and 1.3 is also called APS-H. See http://photonotes.org/articles/beginner-faq/general.html#aps 2. It's not that I'm not aware of the basic advantages of FF vs. APS. It's just that I don't think the sensor is the whole story. You are not using a sensor, you are using a camera and that camera has a lot of features (e.g. AF, ergonomics etc.). It's the conglomerate of features that matters, not just the sensor. For example, before buying my 40D about 2 years ago I considered the 5D but dismissed it, mainly due to poor AF coverage and poor AF speed in the peripheral points. Recently I tried a friend's 5D and after just a few shots I through it back to the bag and grabbed my 40D. Low noise in high ISO is nice but good AF is nicer IMHO. Happy shooting, Yakim.
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    • "Canon and Nikon are creating their own noise problems on the APS-C sensors and then spending huge sums on R&D to reduce noise...Instead of just cramming less on the sensor in the first place? Heavy noise reduction will probably always introduce artifacts. Doesn't seem to make much sense to me..." If I understand the press release and comments on other sites, Canon refined the fabrication technology for the sensor and the apparently improved noise performance is a result of that instead of just using more noise reduction. Obviously, it must be a balanced combination of both. But looking at the test images online at 100% or more, the noise structure looks more like fine grain film than I'm use to seeing from an electronic sensor. I did a comparison on one site that allows image comparison from various cameras and the 7D holds up very well against the 5DmkII and a900. I was originally hoping the 7D would be a FF design but at this point it's a moot point for me. I'm looking forward to trying it out in the real world.
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    • "Putting it another way, the $1700 price makes it $300 less expensive than the full-frame Sony A850. I do not understand why anybody would pay this much for an APS-C camera when you can buy an excellent 4/3 camera for $700, or a 5D (mark 1) for $1900."

      Re: 5D. You can't compare buying new to buying used/refurbished. I prefer buying new whenever I can. Amateur photographers are the only consumers I know of who are happy to buy used/refurbished gear. Since the 5D has been discontinued for years, there isn't an adequate supply of product available.

      While Four Thirds cameras are not bad, they fall well behind APS-C cameras in terms of high ISO performance. The 7D is in a class all its own. Canon has done a remarkable job of improving performance, even with such a high pixel count! Well worth the money.

      Sony's A850 is a very good camera for the price, but its high ISO performance suffers enormously. As long as you are content to shoot at or below 800 ISO, you're golden. The 7D does well at 1600 and 3200 ISO, and if you need such performance, it is worth the price.

      Until Sony improves high ISO performance dramatically, Canon is not worried about losing sales.

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    • "That being said, photo quality is more important to me than any new feature and certainly there are concerns about ramming 18mp onto this sensor, but I'll wait to see the results before drawing any conclusions."

      I was worried about the high pixel count, too, but having seen sample pictures from Imaging Resource, I am most impressed with the results. Canon has done a great job.

      Unless you believe we will never see a 40 mp full-frame sensor, higher pixel count in APS-C is theoretically possible. Canon has proven this.

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    • I suppose it is possible. Imagine taking the same pixel density from the 7D (54545 pixel/mm^2) and putting it onto a FF sensor at 24x36mm; it would be approx a 47MP camera. Hmmm, I can definitely see a 40MP 1Ds MarkIV on the horizon with quad core processors and 1080P video. ;)
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    • Time to upgrade from my 10D !!!
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    • Bob, Thanks for this preview.

      I hope your hands on review might include a full 'study' of this model's low-light useful capability as compared to the 5D MKII (and hopefully the Nikon D700). I am presently using the original 5D and really pushing it to the limit for stage-work. The 'advanced' focus system here interests me and if it does what it says so on-the-box, and if there is a qualitative improvement in low -light useful capability I might be buying one.

      Looking forward to your full review. BW -Mike.
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    • Does macro tracking work for manual focus lenses attached to the camera? Does the focus confirmation also work for manual focus lenses?
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    • "...Recently I tried a friend's 5D and after just a few shots I through it back to the bag and grabbed my 40D. Low noise in high ISO is nice but good AF is nicer..." Holy cow Yakim, I think you are missing a much larger picture here. Full-frame vs. an APS-sized sensor is a big issue considering lens choice. AF, noise, and low ISO are smaller concerns next to composition. If you can't frame up unique shots because of the cropping factor, then you can't sell as well as you used to, as I'm sure any landscape photographer would agree. Maybe you should try the 5D again and this time try it with the intention of utilizing the FF with a nice wide-angle lens, rather than clocking the AF. You don't park a Ferrari in a garrage just because it doesn't get as good gas mileage as your Kia. Happy shooting!
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    • its not a cheap hobby, but if you look after your gear it lasts a long time. I have a 4yr old canon rebel xt and a sigma 10-20mm and 70-200 f2.8 zooms-- the total bill came to about $5,000 back then....that an entry level Dslr and a few gadgets to go with it. now 4 years later the gear is almost in perfect shape and I think this 7D looks to be ok when mated with the new 15-85mm lens. the price with the 12% sales tax here in British Columbia Canada is $3,000 nothing cheap about that, but if it performs well and actually lasts 4 yrs like the rebel xt then maybe it won't be so bad. I sure miss the manual camera film days with respects to handling though. the old lens aperture and exposure were way faster to use. my fingers don't do well with those little electronic buttons. I guess film has pretty well gone but I sure miss my old Nikon f2 and 50mm 1.2 lens.....the shutter is frozen now after owning it 30yrs. pardon my Ramble....was going to go to a Nikon D300s but would have to buy lens.....so will stay with Canon for a bit longer I guess..... ps sure hope the auto focus is as good as the D300's is...
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    • >> If you can't frame up unique shots because of the cropping factor, then you can't sell as well as you used to Who said I can't? >> Maybe you should try the 5D again and this time try it with the intention of utilizing the FF with a nice wide-angle lens, rather than clocking the AF. Why should I? AF is very important to me. Even with WA. Even in macro. >> You don't park a Ferrari in a garrage just because it doesn't get as good gas mileage as your Kia WRT AF the 5D is the Kia..... Happy shooting, Yakim.
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    • I, too, am interested to see whether there will be a 60D, and if so, how it might differ from the 7D. (I use my 20D and 40D all the time, with IS-L lenses, and pretty decent results.) The array of focussing options on the 7D looks interesting: does anyone know whether this array of options is available on the 5D Mk ii? I do a lot of sports and high-speed outdoor photography, and these focussing options look pretty good. I am considering an upgrade -- but I am not sure what to upgrade to, any more... any thoughts?
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    • I, too, am interested to see whether there will be a 60D, and if so, how it might differ from the 7D. (I use my 20D and 40D all the time, with IS-L lenses, and pretty decent results.) The array of focussing options on the 7D looks interesting: does anyone know whether this array of options is available on the 5D Mk ii? I do a lot of sports and high-speed outdoor photography, and these focussing options look pretty good. I am considering an upgrade -- but I am not sure what to upgrade to, any more... any thoughts?
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    • I, too, am interested to see whether there will be a 60D, and if so, how it might differ from the 7D. (I use my 20D and 40D all the time, with IS-L lenses, and pretty decent results.) The array of focussing options on the 7D looks interesting: does anyone know whether this array of options is available on the 5D Mk ii? I do a lot of sports and high-speed outdoor photography, and these focussing options look pretty good. I am considering an upgrade -- but I am not sure what to upgrade to, any more... any thoughts?
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    • >> I, too, am interested to see whether there will be a 60D Yes. See http://www.digitaljournalist.org/issue0909/tech-tips.html Happy shooting, Yakim.
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    • James Cumming , September 03, 2009; 06:02 P.M. Glad to see one more indication that "The Recession" is a hoax. In practical terms getting the shot on the paper- what will these new multi-bucks toys do that the ancient 20D won't? ] I fully concur with you on that point, If I want A video camera I'll buy One But I want a Good DSLR , Not A Toy :
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    • The 7D will no doubt be the king for wildlife and daylight sports once the ISO is kept under 400 is my guess. The new 1D Mk IV may prove to be better in image quality if you don’t plan on cropping, but will not have the image size or room for cropping as the 7D will offer, if the 1D MkVI image is cropped to yeild the same magnification as the 7D, the image will be considerably smaller than the 7D image, this will make the 7D especially beneficial for telephoto photography. The 7D also has a good price which is a big consideration and at the rate Canon is replacing and up-dating their cameras, you will find it easier to keep up with the latest technology without braking the bank. How do the 1Ds Mk III and 1D Mk III shooters feel about the 5D Mk II and 50D now available at a fraction of the cost?
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    • The thing that boggles the mind is this: A decade ago my Elan IIe had a nice custom function that told it, when using partial metering, to link the focusing and metering to the same spot. Implausably, none of the prosumer Canon digital bodies have this essential feature today...I mean, my EOS40D, with 9 focus/metering points, is investing in 9 focus points (3 in the Elan) when, in all metering options other than evaluative, I end up using the central sensor and shifting. In other words, I am using the camera as a fancy point-and-shoot. I was sure, when the 7D was announced, that Canon would fix this. I mean this is obviously just a software issue. I just cannot believe it, but no- there doesnt seem to be an option to link focus and metering in spot or partial modes (I looked it up in the manual). To get this basic function, you must buy an EOS1D! its as though Canon assumes the prosumer segment is made of morons who just count pixels or focus points. It means that the 45 focusing segments in the 7D are nearly useless in anything other than evaluative metering!
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    • I agree. The linkage issue and the fact that there is no joystick in the grip are the things that I miss most in the 7D. Need I say that the D300 has them? :-( Happy shooting, Yakim.
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    • The Nikon HD capabilities is unfortunately fairly poor and you can't really compare the 7D to it. It is a league on its own. The key test really with the 7D is its ability to handle low light, especially with cheap Canon lenses like the 50mm f/1.8 or the more expensive Canon 35mm f/1.4L. On YouTube channels online, you really get to see some very important insight on its performance. Take a look at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBmW7Az1Mpw and other similar videos, you will see very similar results from high end camera bodies at +$17k. It is a game changer.
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