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Beginner Here Would Appreciate Critique


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It's an interesting Landscape. Lots of different features.

Perhaps next shot think about what's intrusive, as well as what elements are interesting: for example the wispy tree branches in the middle at the foreground, do you think that enhances or detracts from your photo?

It's an overcast day, yet there is direct sun popping through the clouds to camera left and in front of the camera - this sunlight creates hard shadows in which there is not much detail in some areas, for example the rock face in front of the blue building, additionally, I assume it is the humidity, creates an haze in the background. Both these areas might benefit from Post Production enhancements.

All in all, if this is an example of your beginning work, I reckon you've done a good job.

Have fun with your journey.

WW 

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Here is a rough (about 1 minute work) Post Production of some of what I would do if this were my Photo. I have made minor increases to Vibrancy; Mid Tone Contrast; Sharpness; Saturation and have Dodged many of the shadow areas.  

This is not 'a finished product' but rather an indication of how I see the image being improved, by using a little more, mainly subtle, Post Production.

The original is on the top.

The tree branches in the front of the image, which annoy my eye, would be best managed by having chosen a different Camera Viewpoint.

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WW

 

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Posted (edited)

Landscapes are easy to photograph, not so easy to photograph well. It's tempting to see a striking scene and point the camera at it, but you have to force yourself to look carefully at the image in the finder, moving your eye around particularly the edges to make sure there's nothing there to detract from the composition.

Also, the lighting is crucial to the success of a picture. Good landscape photographers (which I'm not, to be honest) will return to the same scene at different times of the day, and with different weather conditions. For example in your picture, as William has said, the sun is to the left, but its angle means that the buildings and cliff are not well lit to bring out details. Taking the picture earlier, before the sun moved away, would have improved this.

But yes, it's a great effort.

Edited by John Seaman
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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi @Rivcuban,

There's no doubt (for me) that this is an interesting photo and well worth taking!

@William Michael is IMHO right in suggesting thinking more about 'what makes this photo interesting?' and in adding 'you've done a good job'.

The feedback I can give is that - for me - there are two main areas of interest in this photo:

- the sky
- the sea

 

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Assuming PN statistics are accurate, the OP's last visit was June 8th, the day the photo was posted.  Would be nice if someone who requested a critique stopped by to participate in the discussion.

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On 6/9/2024 at 8:30 AM, John Seaman said:

as William has said, the sun is to the left, but its angle means that the buildings and cliff are not well lit to bring out details. Taking the picture earlier, before the sun moved away, would have improved this.

In addition to this, maybe earlier in the morning the sunlight might also have got a bit warmer and more pleasant.

And when using film, an 81C or at least 81A filter might help to "warm up" the sunlight ?

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Pleasant scene and good capture Nice vantage point and dramtic sky. This is a nice location to revisit with different skies, especially if you can catch a golden hour with a red sunset lighting firery clouds with reds and oranges. As far as the grass in the bottom, it is an artistic choice. For me, I would choose if using it, offset the twigs and perhaps more foreground foliage to frame the shot if going to include it, or none. This may seem like nit picking , perhaps just an artistic choice. Removing the distraction in post is an option. As far as working with bright sunlight, typically cameras dynamic range ( light/shadow) is not the same as the human eye, but you can increase the dynamic ran in post, especially if shooting RAW, by increasing/brightening shadow and turning down bright areas. Be careful doing so as not to over do it and keep an eye on your histogram. You may then want to raise vividness a bit. It is a careful balance so not to over do it. I recommend working with a good color calibrated monitor to. Just a tip to be sure what you see on your monitor is accurate. 

Edited by Mark Keefer
Cheers, Mark
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There are some interesting elements here, and this photo works as a travel memory, perhaps part of a slide show about your vacation. But as a photograph, it doesn't work. The center is dominated by an uninteresting large building surrounded on two sides by dark and muddled areas. The large sandy foreground adds nothing. The water is pushed off to the left.

You might ask yourself this, which should be asked of every photo that you want to be good: "What is this photo about?" Near as I can tell, it's about showing us this village or town from a distance. But, the town isn't very interesting. There's way too much here, and much of it isn't really worth looking at.

Some of the participants here have concentrated on the technical details, but I wouldn't bother with that. Better to put your efforts into a shot with a strong composition instead.

If you were (or could be) walking on the beach, you might get close to the water and see what you can do with the water, the sand, and the jagged seaside cliffs. Leave the buildings out.

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Good start.  Sometimes I find that my eye sees everything and everything is what I want to photograph.  The problem is a wide area can often look just too busy once you photograph it.  There's no subject to look at and your eye roans around.  It;s better to zoom in and include only a couple of details to make the shot more interesting.  For example maybe just the water with the waves and rocks and the two buildings there on the left.  YOu might have to move around and get closer.  It's good to move around and not be afraid of changing positions.  

Edited by AlanKlein
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