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Photo of the Week - #53 9/19/22


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  • Photo of the Week is a member-run feature.
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  • This is not my photo.
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1700720_33a03757e13be2771f623ff0193fb2fc.thumb.jpg.6459f2cbb0ab04c6566af8192fba4b58.jpg

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"You talkin' to me?"

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Doesn't work for me in any way. It looks like a slowish exposure of a sudden mass of water falling (but not a waterfall per se), with the sun making very intense highlights on the spray. It interesting in the sense of I want to know what it is, but as a photo to me it is a miss.
Robin Smith
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I think that the photo is of water cascading down and over a rock, with the shutter speed chosen to provide suitable streak lines for individual drops (perhaps illuminated by flash from the top?). I really like the photo. The pattern of black negative spaces and the rock, which looks to me like a rodent peering out from within the water flow, really helps create an interesting composition.
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Many thanks to all who commented!

 

First, I can assure you that no pixels were harmed in the processing of this image—It’s pretty much how it came out of the camera (though I did slightly modify one anomalously straight line by cloning a few light trails into a gap), with modified contrast and clarity. Robin and Glenn were on the right track in figuring out how it was made: I used a relatively long shutter speed so that bright bubbles would form light trails.

 

We’re looking almost straight down on a pebble in the backwash of a wave. The light trails are formed by individual bubbles in the foam, and the occasional vibrant colors are from the iridescence that some bubbles show. The strong illumination is from the rising sun. I’d had an idea of the image I wanted to make, but it took a week of experimenting (there aren’t a lot of fogless sunrises here) to figure out how to actually accomplish it, since the sun angle had to be as low as I could get it for the illumination to work out (bubbles light, sand dark), and it doesn’t stay that low for long. I used a compromise shutter speed of 1/10 sec—I would have liked it to be longer, but this is the limit of what I could hand-hold. Actually, it’s slightly beyond the limit—I had a lot of blurred images at this speed.

 

I was curious about how strong the pareidolia effect might be with this image. I’d first thought about rotating the image 90 degrees (which was how it was exposed) to help defeat it, but I decided I liked the vertical light trails more. The answer is in: Pareidolia strikes deep. Here’s the image in the original orientation:

 

D02-_MG_7544-Edit-4.thumb.jpg.a418c1bb50625e70fbc11df0cee1f4e0.jpg

 

And here’s the image with Edwin’s suggestion of a modified crop:

 

1487720458_D02-_MG_7544-Edit-4copy.jpg.9c7c150203787021083205a1b3302b7f.jpg

Any opinions on the alternatives?

 

BTW, I realize I never id’d myself on my prior POTW; the open door with the hidden tennis shoe was also mine—#38: Photo of the Week - #38 6/6/22

 

Now I’m going to be humming Buffalo Springfield all day.

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I think if it had been shown in the "right" orientation, then more of us would have understood the image a bit better. I was wondering how a burst of water like that could have fallen vertically just when you were ready to photograph it. Now you explain it it makes it easier to comprehend. I think it is an interesting image, but it doesn't ultimately appeal to me, but I am just one person so what do I know.
Robin Smith
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I like the composition as originally presented the best, since I am attracted to the pattern of black negative spaces as much as the streak lines.

 

Sanford - It's not surprising that someone who lives in Monterey sees a sea otters in the photo. Someone who lives in North Dakota might see a prairie dog.

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The combined sense of movement, abstraction, and nature grab me. It’s one I can look at and get lost in, not leading me to clarify. As an aside, I like the pre-crop spaciousness and scale as well as the pre-rotated up and down energy.
  • Like 1

"You talkin' to me?"

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Many thanks to all who commented!

 

First, I can assure you that no pixels were harmed in the processing of this image—It’s pretty much how it came out of the camera (though I did slightly modify one anomalously straight line by cloning a few light trails into a gap), with modified contrast and clarity. Robin and Glenn were on the right track in figuring out how it was made: I used a relatively long shutter speed so that bright bubbles would form light trails.

 

Now I’m going to be humming Buffalo Springfield all day.

 

Well done Leslie! A defined goal combined with perseverance and skill.

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