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Kodachrome in XTOL


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Hi,

Has anybody processed Kodachrome K40 in XTOL with any kind of success, or come across any developing times which worked?

 

I gather it's difficult (if not impossible) to get Kodachrome K40 processed in colour these days, but that it can be processed in black and white.

 

I have an old roll of K40 and some XTOL to hand so would like to give it a bash and see if I can pull anything off the film.

 

Many thanks.

 

Luke

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Well, it's going to be a negative, so the developing time doesn't need to be terribly precise.

 

Cut off a bit of leader and do a clip test?

 

All that's needed is an egg-cupful of developer at the right temperature and, in full roomlight, dunk the fogged leader and time it until you get a good density developed on it. Then that's your dev time.

 

It's a pretty reliable method, and doubles as a good test to find out if a suspect developer is still useable.

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Thanks for the reply, and the suggestion. I'll give it a shot and post back here for reference. Supposedly the tricky bit is removing the remjet layer once processed. This exposed roll I have is probably 40 years old so if I get anything at all I'll be pleased.
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Ah yes, the Remjet.

That's going to make judging the developed density difficult/impossible unless it's removed before development.

 

Alan Marcus posted this in another thread:

In the dark, pre-wash with 20% solution of sodium sulfite, buff off the removabel jet black backing (REMJET). Develop and fix in ordinary b&w chemicals.

 

Obviously no need for complete darkness if you just want to remove the backing from a bit of already fogged leader.

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  • 2 years later...

Some years ago, I did 5247 in C41 chemistry.

5247 also has RemJet.

When the film was in the rinse (off the reel) I just rubbed it off.

It seems that the developer softens it up enough to easily get off.

 

Color Kodachrome processing requires it off first, but otherwise it can be done later.

-- glen

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