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RAW to .jpg canon 350D


chelsea
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I have a 10 yr old Canon 350D, when I first got and set up the software I could process raws into 300 dpi jpgs using windows XP. The

camera has held up much better than my computer hard drives, so as computers are replaced the software got downloaded a couple

more times on new machines. Now when I download raws to computer and try to convert into jpgs, it will only convert them to 72 dpi no

matter what the setting. I'm having to convert to tifs in dpp, then individually convert the tifs to jpg in photoshop if I want higher

resolution, a time consuming pain in the backside. Any suggestions?

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<p>The value of DPI you see in a file is completely meaningless. Changing the value from 72 dpi to 300 dpi does really nothing to change the resolution. The real resolution is the number of pixels horizontal versus pixels vertical; those values will not change when you go from 72 to 300 dpi.<br>

The DPI setting only comes into play when printing, and even then the printer program is usually able to handle the 72dpi setting and yet print a 300 dpi print.<br>

So, no need to worry and you can safely dismiss the step of going from 72 to 300.</p>

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<blockquote>

<p>I'm having to convert to tifs in dpp, then individually convert the tifs to jpg in photoshop if I want higher resolution, a time consuming pain in the backside. <strong>Any suggestions?</strong></p>

</blockquote>

<p>Yes. Stop wasting your time doing this. ;-) :-)</p>

<p>As Wouter noted, it is essentially a meaningless value. The maximum <strong>resolution</strong> of your 350D is 3,456 × 2,304 pixels. Changing the dpi value from 72 to 300 does not increase the real resolution of your file, or the quality of your printed or displayed image.</p>

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<p>I was told to use fastone to convert raw to jpg<br>

by another user fsviewersetup.exe<br>

I tried to get a url<br>

here is my old thread<br>

http://www.photo.net/digital-darkroom-forum/00bf3n<br>

and here is the url hope it helps<br>

<a href="http://www.faststone.org/FSViewerDetail.htm" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.faststone.org/FSViewerDetail.htm</a></p>

<p>the program is free to use<br>

and read the thread for other suggestions<br>

I also converted a group of pcx files from my wife;'s system</p>

 

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<p>Not to pile on, but as has been said: the number is indeed meaningless. Your resolution is your total pixel dimensions: x by y.</p>

<p>However, I'm curious about what software you are using to convert from RAW to JPG. If you're using Canon's DPP, there's a DPI value setting right in the dialog box when you choose the "Convert and Save" command from the File menu. </p>

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Rob, I've used that, but in spite of setting the command it still comes out 72 dpi. I had been told to save as 300 dpi for printing, and where I was getting my prints

done also told me 300 dpi, so it's become a habit. I will try a few with 72 dpi and see what happens.

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<p>Hmm,<br /> I would suggest that the stored DPI figure isn't entirely meaningless.<br /> The same resolution image (say 500x500pl) saved with 300 and 72 dpi would take up 42.3cm and 17.64cm of 'real estate' respectively, and the printer would act upon the stored settings. So, this needs to be acknowledged somewhere along the line and the printing lab is asking for images saved at 300dpi.<br /> Sorry Rose-Marie I don't have your software so can't comment on a solution.</p>
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<p>What about using Camera Raw and setting the output DPI when converting.</p>

<p>I still shoot with a Canon 300D Rebel. So it has the 72 DPI resolution output too with the original software. I month back I did upgrade to the current Canon conversion software. This was to have a vastly better conversion in RAW for Infrared pictures taken on a Canon 10D. The Canon software properly converts the IR color-space, whereas Camera RAW does not.</p>

<p>If you keep using the original Canon software, I recommend you change the camera over to shooting RAW and outputting the finished image as a TIFF. This preserves all of the color information. However this type of work will be better if handled in Photoshop with the RAW converter.</p>

<p>If you look at your JPG in Photoshop in the Image size tool, most likely the 72 DPI jpg will have a very large inch dimensions. 72 DPI at any print size will look terrible--especially a large print like the Image Size tool shows you. Here is where the conversion should take place for printing--after you have made any alterations to the photo. Once you know what size you want the photo to be printed at, just change the DPI to 300 and then the physical dimension to the size you want. The picture will be resized by both DPI and physical print size.</p>

<p>The resolution of the older Canon's meant I rarely sized an image larger than 11" on the short length dimension. For printing at Costco, this meant the physical image was 11 x 16.5 and centered on a 12 x 18 paper sheet. In photoshop I would resize the canvas to 12x18 and this gives you white space for print handling and paper area for mounting to a matte board for framing. The white space area at the bottom of the print is an excellent place for any information text you may want to add about the image. This way the information is not lost to future generations.</p>

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<p>[[nd the printer would act upon the stored settings]]<br>

<br>

It won't actually. It'll look at the print size requested, it'll look at the pixel dimensions of the image, and it'll resize through interpolation (if needed). And most of the time the results will be indistinguishable from uprezzing (if needed) in photoshop. <br>

<br>

[[Once you know what size you want the photo to be printed at, just change the DPI to 300 and then the physical dimension to the size you want.]]<br>

<br>

This is entirely unnecessary and a waste of time. Print to the size you want. Let the printer handle the rest. If you're concerned about possibly printing too large for your viewing distance requirements, print an appropriately sized portion of the image to a 4x6 and judge the quality from there. That would determine if you needed to do any further interpolation in Photoshop. </p>

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