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Kodachrome K64 has been discontinued...


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<p>Sad dayin the history of photography. I shot 100's of KJodachrome in the 70's and 80's.<br>

I remember when Kodachrome 64 came out as alternative to Kodachrome II. There was always the Kofdachrome - Ektachrome decision to make in those days. Still have some yellow and red metal film cans around.<br>

I have not shot it in a few years , but it was nice knowing that it was still an option.<br>

I dread the day we read - Kodak stops film production. </p>

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<p>As I look back I notice that I have shot 1 roll of Kodachrome in the last year... I think I am also at fault here. but I can see I shot about 500" of Tri-X so I am at least helping with that.<br>

I still have about 50 feet of APX 25 in the freezer but just 1 roll of Kodachrome... Time to shoot it. Sad day yes but we will move on.</p>

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<p>The last coating of K-64 probably occurred some time ago. It was originally designated emulsion number 1551. Each time a portion of this coating was pulled out of the freezer and slit, perforated, spooled, and packaged, it was given a new emulsion number. When new emulsion numbers topped 1560, I hoped maybe there had been a new coating. The increased expiration date also suggested this. Today's announcement eliminates this hope. If there had been a new coating, it would have been big enough to last longer than this fall. <br>

I cut my eye teeth (photographically speaking) on K-II. I still recall watching my grandfather's slide shows (they were worth watching). From 1984 - 1989 I was the production formulation engineer in charge of Kodachrome. I've known this time would come, but it is still sad to read the news. To quote my own little <a href="http://ronald.andrews.googlepages.com/kodachrome">website</a>: "</p>

<p>Why wait for the funeral to deliver the eulogy?<br>

It's time for a celebration!<br>

If you send me links to your Kodachrome image collections, I will post them.</p>

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<p>This is sad news that I've been hoping wouldn't be delivered. While K64 isn't applicable to every project that I work on, it's my favorite film and it seems like my method of working syncs well with Kodachrome's characteristics. This is the fourth time I've had to endure painful Kodachrome discontinuations: super8 K40 sound film, super8 K40 silent, K200, and now K64. (I wasn't shooting chromes when K25 was around... I wish I had been).<br>

I started a project about 18 months ago on Kodachrome that was a response to Kodachrome slides that my mother had shot a few decades ago. Since I wanted to shoot my photos on Kodachrome, I'm glad that I started this project a while ago. I probably would have run out of time due to the phase out of Kodachrome and Dwayne's processing. I believe I can finish what needs to be finished during 2009.<br>

I want to do a couple other small projects using Kodachrome that I could finish by the end of 2010. I'll probably end up buying a couple dozen rolls for this purpose, depending on whether Dwayne's K64 processing is kaput at the end of 2010. If it were extended, I would buy more K40 to tide myself over.</p>

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<p>It just would have been nice if Kodak gave this film a little more than, oh...sales of this film have been miserable, so we're gonna give it the ax!</p>

<p>Even though this wasn't my favorite film, I still shoot it sometimes and admire those who know how to use it properly.<br>

Why is it so much to ask that Kodak show a small shred of respect for this legendary film and let it make its milestone anniversary.<br>

I don't think that is asking for too much.</p>

<p>Why should we be happy that Kodak has yanked yet another slide film from its catalog in the last two years?<br>

Ektachromes 64, 100, 160T, 320T, and 400X. Elite Chrome 400. Kodachrome 200 and now 64.<br>

Not to mention the color negative films UC 100 & 400, HD 200, Portra 100T and the infrared B&W film.<br>

I'm sorry... the possibility that <em>maybe </em>they'll come out with an Ektar 400 doesn't make me think things are going in the right direction.</p>

 

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<p>I'd rather have Kodachrome 25 back. Didn't appreciate the difference from 64 when both were common. Not really moved by Kodachrome 64 anymore, just 25 and 200.<br>

I'm darned grateful to Kodak for the recent presents of Portra 400NC-3, Ektar 100, and T-MAX 100 TMY-2. They have been generous as the dickens keeping Kodachrome going, and I don't want those expenses to prevent some other wonderful new film.<br>

Ektachromes and C-41 films are perfectly reasonably stable these days. Just bought a bunch of Ektachrome slides from 1973-1978, and the color looks just dandy. Just don't store them in the attic.</p>

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<p>I'm really surprised it had taken this long. I've already blogged about what I think, but I'd rather have Kodak put effort in films I know that I will use, rather than a film whose time has passed. Kodak showed more patience than most companies would, in this instance. I'm more upset that they stopped making Verichrome Pan and Panatomic-X. </p>
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<p>I find it to be an interesting coincidence that the end of Kodachrome will come roughly ten years after the Nikon D1 helped revolutionize photography. <br>

I want to say that I recently discovered Porta, and it is a fantastic film. I hope to be using it long into the future. On a recent trip, I had three rolls of it and the image quality is excellent. </p>

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<p>I'm so glad I decided to finally try a few rolls of Kodachrome. I had never used slide film before, but I knew I had to try Kodachrome while I still had the chance. I love it, it was the most amazing thing ever. I was totally blown away when I got my slides in the mail and saw these little positive images on film. The colors are absolutely amazing.<br /> <br>

But I agree with Josh. We knew this day was coming. It sucks, but everytime there was a discussion about Kodachrome, everyone would preface it by saying "shoot it now while you still have a chance." This was hardly unexpected. </p>

<p>And I also agree that we shouldn't read too much into it. Kodak has been talking about this for a LONG time, that Kodachrome was going to be discontinued. I don't think we should read too much into this about film production in general. To me, the fact that Kodak started making the new Ektar film in 120 rolls is very encouraging. Remember about a year ago when we were all saying we hope they make it in 120? But everyone was saying "no way" and they would never do that, and we'll just have to be happy with 35mm. Well, they did it! Ektar is now available in 120.</p>

<p>I wasn't around in the 60's and 70's, and I was a little kid in the 80's. So I admit that I don't have the same experience and emotional attachment to Kodachrome that a lot of other people have. I tried Kodachrome, I really liked it, and I'm sad to hear about any film being discontinued. But I agree with Josh that we need to move on and support Kodak so that they continue to make other films. I mean, how can any film continue to be made when there was only one place left in the world that still developed it!</p>

<p>What kind of bothers me though is what's going to happen to Dwayne's Photo? I'll bet Kodachrome processing was probably one of their main sources of income. Not their only source of income of course, since they develop all kinds of film. But I'm sure this is going to have a big effect on them. I REALLY hope we don't read some day about Dwayne's Photo closing next. I've sent a bunch of film to them over the past couple of years (color print film and 8mm movie film), and they've always done a great job. They seemed to be doing well, so I doubt they would close. But it does make you wonder what will happen when Kodachrome disappears. </p>

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<p>Kodak is down to three 35mm slide films: E100, E100 vivid and E200. I don't understand why they phased out E400 in favor of E200.<br>

Fuji on the other hand has P100, P400x, Velvia 50, Velvia 100, Sensia 100, Sensia 200, Sensia 400, Astia 100.<br>

Right now I'm shooting Fuji Provia 400x and Kodachrome. When Kodachrome is gone, I'll probably shoot 400X and maybe also Provia 100.</p>

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<p>I'll continue to have Dwayne's process my E6 films. I also like the fact that I can buy film from Dwayne's the same time I have my film processed.<br>

In my opinion, they deserve our support not only for the excellent job they do, but also for supporting film by processing older formats discontinued films, processing super8 movie film, and also in being the only Kodachrome processor in the world. They earned my business.</p>

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<blockquote>

<p>" I don't understand why they phased out E400 in favor of E200."</p>

</blockquote>

<p>Probably because E200 pushed to 400 was far less grainy than Ektachrome 400. (There was no E400.)</p>

<p>And Provia 400X blows both of them out of the water.</p>

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<p>How unusual is it for a single company/business to have what is essentially a world monopoly on a service? It could be common for all I know, but Dwayne's has the entire world to themselves and has for some time now. That can't be overly common.</p>
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<p>By coincidence, I ordered my very first roll of Kodachrome last week. When I heard the news, I quickly ordered some more. I have no idea whether or not I will like it, or if I can indeed get decent exposures with it, but I am so looking forward to start shooting. The first couple of rolls will be shot in Berlin this summer, and I think I will save the rest for when I go to Italy or France.</p>
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1974 - ~1990: Kodachrome films were processed at the local Kodak lab here in Vienna, Austria, taking 1 - 2 days. They came back as cardboard-mounted slides in these nice yellow plastic boxes - or as sleeved film strips in red-yellow envelopes, if sold process-paid, but unmounted.

 

Then, the K14 lab in Vienna closed, processing was moved to Stuttgart, Germany, then to Lausanne, Switzerland, and finally to Dwayne's at Parsons, USA. In 2002, a ten roll brick of process-paid unmounted K64 was available for 60 Euros by mail-order from Germany; today, one process-paid mounted roll costs 20 Euros at local retail shops with a 2 1/2-week turnaroud time to Dwayne's and back.

 

I have shot my final roll of K64 this spring with my collectible Minolta XD and later bought a Silverfast IT8 calibration slide for scanning. Finally I decided to trade about a dozen of frozen K64 for slide film in green boxes, and now I have a last K25 (exp. 2002) left, and some K200 professional frozen for almost 20 years. K25 was nice, without doubt, and impractically slow.

 

Already when Fujichrome Provia 100F was introduced 10 years ago, Kodachrome 25 and 64 had become obsolete. I hope that the variety of the green boxes will continue for some time, but I will not miss Kodachrome.

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<p>It is sad news but I think we all knew it was inevitable to happen eventually. I think however there is still a future for film, but sadly not with Kodak. Film will likely render down the same pathway of other obsolete mediums and become a "specialty" medium for ""specialty artist. Films will be the product of profit for small independent companies who are not so large they must sell a million units to turn a profit. Ironically, the major producers of an obsolete medium are the ones who loose first, because their production methods where engineered for an enourmouse and expensive volume output. Perhaps not with Kodak, but I expect that black and white films will remain avialable for at least another century. They will be the product of small (at least in comparison to Kodak) companies such as "Photogrpher's Formulary" or "Liquid Light". Maybe Addox and Egfe could already be regarded in this category? In regards to Kodachrome, I've been told the vintage K-14 Processor at Dwaynes is a sight to see in operation. I wish someone could document in video shorts the device in it's last day's of use. I'm told it's huge and bulks manuals that are almost endless. The last of it's kind I suppose.</p>
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<p style="float:left; margin-right:10px"><a href="../learn/film/open-letter-to-film-users"><img src="../learn/film/open-letter-to-film-users/viva-film-small.jpg" alt="" width="185" /> </a>

<p>I hope everyone realizes that blaming Kodak for films being discontinued is not a productive avenue of discussion.</p>

<p>Kodak doesn't want to discontinue films, they want to sell film and make money. You want to ensure that your favorite film is still around in a decade? Then get out there and be a part of the solution. Introduce others to the joys of film. Don't sit around making "woe is us" or "you digital users are jerks" posts. Get out there and walk the walk. Give an old camera to a young photographer (we've all got 4-5 old SLR's in our closets). Remind your wedding photographer friends that they can gain hours of their lives back (and have a marketing tool that stands out) if they shoot film and have a relationship with a good lab. Simply share the joy that you get from film with others.THAT is what is going to turn the tide and stop the death spiral.</p>

<p>There is no way to win the "digital or film, which is higher quality" argument. Flat out, it's as pointless (and as messy) as pissing into the wind. But there is nobody in the world who can tell you are wrong if you say "I use film because I love shooting with a Leica rangefinder. It makes me happy and here is why." Everyone on this thread has a passion for film. Share that passion. Nobody wants to listen to a sour old crank who thinks the sky is falling. Anyone over the age of 30 knows that young people especially just tune out when grandpa gets up on his soapbox. But anyone can be excited by proxy when talking to someone with a genuine love and passion for doing something.</p>

<p>That's what my whole point was in starting the <a href="../learn/film/open-letter-to-film-users">VivaFilm project</a> . Stop the pointless argument and start doing something that might actually help us defend the castle for another 10, 20, or 50 years. They still make buggy whips and horse saddles. When was the last time you heard a horse riding enthusiast get in a shouting match with a car owner? Never. Or hell, make it something even closer to the horse, a bicycle owner. I have never in my life, and neither have you, heard two people shouting at each other in a bar about which was the higher quality choice for riding to the lake, a horse or a bike. Sure, they might be talking about which they personally love and why. But no bike owner is standing there saying "The lake will be higher quality if you ride the bike, dumbass". </p>

<p>Love film, shoot film, share film. VivaFilm.</p>

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<blockquote>

<p>As I understand it, Kodak has said that recently they were making one production run of k64 a year then spooling it as needed. They just recently made their production run for this year and have that film ready to send out over the next 4-6 months (depending on how fast they sell it out). Add to that the fact that Dwaynes is comitted to processing Kodachrome through the end of 2010, and Kodachrome is easily going to roll through it's 75th annivarsary.</p>

</blockquote>

<p>Actually, Josh, K64 will be sold out by early fall according to EK's own estimates. I believe it will be a lot sooner than that given the hoarding that is already taking place.</p>

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