Zeus Alphamat?

Discussion in 'Classic Manual Cameras' started by jamesinealing, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. I have come across an old "Zeus Alphamat" 35mm camera. To say it's
    basic would be an understatement! It appears to be in very good
    condition and is complete with box (which says "Made in England") and
    instructions.

    I have tried a Google search and found absolutely nothing about it!
    Do you know of this camera?

    Many thanks

    James
     
  2. Please post a picture of it.
     
  3. Sorry, it was in a pile of junk in a sale with a couple of other Kodak (Box Brownie and Junior) cameras and caught my eye. I thought I'd check it on eBay/web but drew a blank. I wasn't able to take a photo, and have to decide by tomorrow if it's worth a speculative few bucks buying it!

    I may just do it to satisfy my intrigue - I simply can't believe that there's a make and model of camera that isn't listed anywhere on the web, especially English-made.

    James
     
  4. There is an old magazine ad for the camera on this site,
    but not any other information.

    http://www.gbcameras.org.uk/
     
  5. Maybe you should buy it. This is probably the last one you will
    ever see. :)
    So the name is pronounced Z-Yoos. What on earth were they thinking.
     
  6. It looks like a lot of other cheap bakelite cameras of the period. I wonder if the camera was made in England as well as the box. I'd say its worth buying for curiosity value.
     
  7. OK, I bought it.
    Here are some pictures - click on the thumbnails to go to a full gallery on my site....
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  8. Run some film through it and post the photos later, I would like to see them. I do know that some of the old box cameras produced some amazing photos through my endeavors of restoring old photos. Of course they were medium format film with fine grain. I had rather see the end product of these old classics that the classics themselves.
     
  9. Ron, funilly enough that's exactly what I've just been doing. The instructions give no idea of what effective aperture it is and just say shoot at 1/25 unless sunny or fast action! I assume in those days it was pretty slow film, so given that it's a dull day here in London I put in T-Max 400 and shot mainly at 1/75.

    Now, can anyone recommend somewhere in West London (or via post) to develop the film - I've not had any B&W developed for years, and whilst I have some old darkroom equipment somewhere I neither have a dark room, nor any chemicals!

    Thanks all for your interest.

    James
     

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