Yashica electro 35 rangefinders.

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by frederick_joicey, Aug 18, 2013.

  1. Just bought a Yashica Electro 35 - an early model as it has the recess on the bottom plate below the back release. Film speed 12-500. Serial No.: 90704852 . Already I am hooked, and although having acquired a Minolta Hi-Matic 9 in the last few days, I am looking at further Yashica RFs in the electro range.
    Does anyone know where I can find a list of the models, hopefully chronologically, showing features of the models ?
     
  2. Try cameraquest.com and go to classic camera info. Scroll down to Yashica. It may be of some help.
     
  3. Manuals for several versions of the Yashica Electro 35 are available from http://www.butkus.org/chinon/yashica.htm
    Winfried Buechsenschuetz on this site is/was a collector of these cameras.
    my sole entry into the class at http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00WQDe
     
  4. My Electro 35 is the 90,504,446 (previous to yours) that my father bought new at the time. It's a great camera to use in automatic with priority of the aperture, but impractical for exposure changes (you can only change the selection of the sensitivity of the film). I have a parasol in the original case, instruction manual ... and is a camera that I like to use from time to time.
     
  5. The "Yashica-Guy" seems to keep his battery adapter construction under wraps.
    So in case anybody wishes to know about a simple solution to the battery issue; I simply rolled up some 35mm film just enough to produce a loose tube to physically stabilize the new *6 volt battery. The spring is pulled from a readily available cheap little LED flashlight. I jammed it into the battery cap.
    Going this route no soldering or damage is done to the original design... *No voltage or amperage concerns for the hearty electronics.
    00bvHy-541995984.JPG
     
  6. Not to throw a wet blanket or anything but 50-50 chance you start collecting these things they'll all be in
    the cupboard in a year or two collecting dust or you'll have to go to the trouble of selling them. You can
    probably donate them somewhere though, which might be a good thing.

    On the other hand, if you enjoy it, enjoy it. :)

    The Canonet I bought a few years ago has only seen one roll of film, with no plans for more. Why use it when I have a Leica?
     
  7. Ray is probably right. I have a few 'classic' film cameras, some dating back to the 50s, which haven't been used since I got them! Much more sadly, though, I also have an excellent classic M6 which has seen only one roll of film in the last 18 months! I can't bring myself to sell it, having already disposed of an M7 and an M8, but the immediacy and quality of XPro1 and X100 and the cost of film and processing just make me pick those up when I go out!
     
  8. Thanks to all for the information you have posted. I was aware of Butkus and also Yashica Guy, but I will have a look at the other links.
    As regards a battery adapter for the Electro 35s, I have just bought one on ebay. It is milled from aluminium and fits all the models. Cost £6.99p It was listed as Yashica Electro 35 battery adapter sleeve TR164. The seller (in UK) was 0182david.
    I also have several 35 slrs which I would call modern classics, but I use them in rotation so they are never just stuck away in a cupboard.
    Thanks for the posts, but if anyone else has useful comments and observations, please post.
    If anyone is interested there is a Yashica Lynx 14 here on the bay. Sale ends today. Present bid £54, but reserve price has not been met.
     
  9. Yes, these are great cameras. I've taken the plunge myself. Here are a couple things I've learned:
    I wrote a short piece here about how to test your Electro.
    Most all Electros need to have the Pad of Death (a.k.a. "POD") replaced if it hasn't been done already.
    These cameras are great for fill flash. Just a) leave the camera set for "Auto" not flash, b) set the flash on Auto for 1-2 stops under exposure, and c) choose an f-stop that works.
    The best battery adapter is by eBay seller bennfoto. He doesn't have it listed right now, but here's a recent sale item # 111098860403

    You asked about the models. Yashica Guy has the best run-down. Personally, I like the GX for smaller size, sensor inside the filter ring, higher ASA, and overall feel.

    There are several good options for servicing these cameras; and many are successful DIY.

    Enjoy your camera.
     
  10. Sebastian, Thanks for your post. I came across your test article last week, and printed it off. Last night I sat down and went through each step, as you laid them out. Every thing seems to be working correctly. But at point No. 9 set it to B, nothing happened, and I thought that there was a fault; but with the battery then inserted, and pressing the shutter release button, the shutter remained open for as long as I held it down.
    I don't do my own developing so I am awaiting the return of the first film used in the Electro 35.
     
  11. Not to throw a wet blanket or anything but 50-50 chance you start collecting these things they'll all be in the cupboard in a year or two collecting dust or you'll have to go to the trouble of selling them.
    Why use it when I have a Leica?​
    This definitely shows why this post should have been on the Classic Manual Camera forum instead of here where some people don't "get" the old camera user/collector thing. :|
     
  12. I suppose you may be correct re Classic Manual Camera forum, but when I started searching on PhotoNet, and seeing 'Leica and Rangefinders' I thought that the most appropriate. And searching here there aremany references to non Leicas.
     
  13. Just playing devil's advocate, no big deal.
     
  14. That's OK, Ray.
    We wouldn't have taken it seriously anyway since our obsessive anal qualities would not have allowed us to think that you could really have meant it. ;)
    I was not actually proposing that the choice of forums mattered all that much.
     
  15. Frederick, you are correct that it is okay to post this here. All rangefinders are accepted here, even "Goldfinger Specials", plated in Russia with love. JDM has one that is beyond compare!
     
  16. Thanks for the welcome in here, Jim. Although I may have been slightly mistaken, I did want to rub shoulders with the Leica bunch !! The only Leica I own is the R5, which I treat myself to 3 yrs back. Methinks some in here could be miffed if the Yashica RFs take photos almost as good as a Leica.!!!!
     
  17. Methinks some in here could be miffed if the Yashica RFs take photos almost as good as a Leica.!!!!​
    I doubt most would care if anyone. My experience here tells me that people value talent more than cameras. As for your R5, you are welcome to post photos from it in the weekly w/nw thread. It's a Leica and Rangefinders forum not a Leica Rangefinders forum. Same applies for photos from the Yashica Electro 35.
     
  18. It's a Leica and Rangefinders forum not a Leica Rangefinders forum. Same applies for photos from the Yashica Electro 35.​
    Absolutely. Over half of my Leica shots were taken with the R-system. You are in the wrong forum if you think we care what camera took any photo. We all like Leicas, but I think I speak for all when I say that we do not believe they are the only cameras worth using. Most of us use, or have used, a number of different cameras.
     
  19. I like Robin's comments as I still use both SLR and rangefinder film systems. This forum encourages discussions on a broad spectrum of Leica, rangefinder, digital, film and image making topics. I've just found out that a local photo finisher kept his Instamatic printing equipment so I'll finish off the 1970's Kodacolor cartridge in my Dad's Instamatic 500 just to see what he left in the camera. Hope mine are as good as his.
     
  20. But at point No. 9 set it to B, nothing happened, and I thought that there was a fault; but with the battery then inserted, and pressing the shutter release button, the shutter remained open for as long as I held it down.​
    That's right. My initial "how to test" instructions were in error here and were corrected further down in that thread.

    These cameras need a battery to keep the shutter open longer than 1/500th.
     
  21. Sebastian, Thanks for that. I missed your correction further down. But we all make mistakes, eg. me posting in here, but who cares, everyone has taken it light heartedly.
    Should have my first film back today, so will be hoping for good results.
     
  22. But we all make mistakes, eg. me posting in here...​
    How is that a mistake? You posted a rangefinder topic in a rangefinder forum. Doesn't sound like a mistake to me.
     
  23. Just picked up the photos of 1st film through the Yashica. Only used negative film to start with. Most of the shots are fine with no problem, yet a few have what looks like may be light leaks, but I would have thought if that was the case, then a light leak should show up, most likely on every shot.
    Returning to the POD, I have just had my hands on a Yashica MG1 which is in working order, and I now have heard the distinct and slight thump/clunk when a Yash is working correctly. That noise is absent on my Electro 35, but as I mention most of the photos taken have come out fine.
    Next point - light seals on the Yashicas, I have found complete seals on both the above cameras near the hinge on the back cover. There is no evidence of sticky, deteriorated foam anywhere else on either camera.
     
  24. I've heard of light leaking on the viewfinder portion before. Are the bright spots on the bottom right of each frame? Scans
    of the photos would help.
     
  25. Additionally, anyone know of there is vertical rangefinder adjustment on the Electro 35?
     
  26. I have several Electro35. First, the G in the name has nothing to do with "gold contacts" - even the earliest models had gold plated slide contacts.
    I am not sure how vertical adjustment of the rangefinder is done in detail but you have to remove the viewfinder housing first. Usually there is an adjustment screw on the bottom of the small "mirror turret", i.e. the base of the small mirror which is actuated when focussing. You have to adjust the rangefinder first vertically, then horizontally, or in other words, the vertical adjustment probably will disturb the horizontal alignment a bit.
    Once you opened the viewfinder, you should clean everything. But do NOT touch the rear surface (towards the eyepiece) of the semi-transparent mirror!
     
  27. Jim, and others, The more I look at the photos I suspect some of the problem might be lens flare, as that problem occurs when I shot with the sun in front. Other shots, taken in shadow(in the afternoon) are perfect.
    Bear with me and I will scan various shots and upload them for your opinions.
     
  28. I have just done a rudimentary test on the Yashica, Completely dark in the room. Camera set to B, then I pressed the shutter button; held the shutter open, then with a torch shone light at the back of the camera, all round the joins, hinges, etc. I could see nothing at all whilst looking through the front of the lens towards the back of the camera, not even a glimmer or slight bit of light.
    Can I take that as a plus, not necessarily 100%, result ?
     
  29. "vertical rangefinder adjustment on the Electro 35?" Jim T.
    1. Remove two screws holding "Battery Check" panel
    2. Use MEK or Acetone to loosen up "loctite" around adjust screw
    3. Move gently and slightly until (a far distance target) vertically aligns
    4. Infinity/horizontal adjustment access hole under hot shoe "shield/cover"
    00bwQ4-542124884.JPG
     
  30. Thank you, Gus!
     
  31. Pretty camera. Isn't this Yashica a 'auto only' (no full manual exposure control) camera? I see an f stop scale but no shutter speed ring in the photo. Looks like aperture preferred auto only for exposure control. I've always had an irrational dislike of auto only cameras but this Yashica seems to have acquired quite quite a fan base. My negative feelings toward auto only cameras are probably unwarrented but well.......there it is, too old to shake it now.
     
  32. Pretty camera. Isn't this Yashica a 'auto only' (no full manual exposure control) camera? I see an f stop scale but no shutter speed ring in the photo. Looks like aperture preferred auto only for exposure control. I've always had an irrational dislike of auto only cameras but this Yashica seems to have acquired quite quite a fan base. My negative feelings toward auto only cameras are probably unwarrented but well.......there it is, too old to shake it now.
     
  33. Yes, this is a "fully auto" camera. Only "manual" shutter speed is 1/500 sec if you remove the battery. You can set the aperture accordingly.
    The B setting on the "shutter" dial works with battery only.
    Once these beasts work, they work great. I had excellent results even with nighttime shots (with a tripod, of course) and automatically controlled exposure times of several tens of seconds.
    @Gus: thanks for showing a less invasive way to the vertical adjustment. I used to work a lot on the E35 (once I owned half a dozen or so, I have reduced this to three E35 and most, if not all, other rangefinders of the Electro series) but I have forgotten a lot.
     
  34. yet a few have what looks like may be light leaks, but I would have thought if that was the case, then a light leak should show up, most likely on every shot.​
    Think of is this way. If it's a light leak, say in the seals, then the light is coming in when the camera is idle in bright light. And, where will it hit? Probably not on the frame behind the lens. So, it might be very different from frame to frame

    In my experience, the Electros leak at the film door hinge, even when they come back from work by good people. Try a half case and see if this helps reduce the leak. I added additional velvet material at the film door hinge on several of my Electros. See this thread on another site with several examples of leaks at hinge door.
    FWIW, I think the Electros, with a clean lens, are quite resistant to flare. But, show us some examples.
     
  35. To test for light leaks:
    - Load the camera.
    - Remove the battery (so it'll fire at 1/500th) and put on the lens cap (to minimize exposure through the lens).
    - Shoot four blank frames.
    - Leave the camera in bright light for a couple of days. Now take a photo and advance the film.
    Shoot the rest of the roll. Check the first four frames to light leaks. See the thread I linked just above.
     
  36. I've always had an irrational dislike of auto only cameras but this Yashica seems to have acquired quite quite a fan base.​
    I feel the same way and it is a strange feeling to not be able set the exposure off of some other surface than what is in front of the camera. With my other cameras I may meter off of a floor to take a shot of something nearby but with very contrasty light. Can't do it with the Yashica.
    However, my experience is that it handles difficult lighting very well. Dark stairwells with bright splashes of light on the walls? No blowouts and dark details render well.
    Another thing that surprised me was the sharpness of the lens and the pleasing (to me) out of focus rendering. For a 47 year old stamped metal, mass market camera an old CdS cell I wasn't expecting much but the little camera delivers.
    I find it slow to operate as I am frequently adjusting stops because of the warning lights, but I am impressed by my Yashica Electro 35. It won't replace any rangefinder in my collection but it is fun to shoot and a much better camera than going prices would suggest.
    Click through to see a larger image...
    [​IMG]
     
  37. I have scanned some of the photos from first use of the Electro 35, and some show what might be lens flare; others possible light leaks; and yet there are some of the photos absolutely perfect. Hoping some of you can provide interesting comment re the possible defect.
    However, I am now lost as to how to attach the scans to this post of mine. Any help/suggestions.
     
  38. Just done a search on Photonet, and found a similar query to mine, so hopefully I can now attach the photos.
    00bwt9-542172084.jpg
     
  39. Struggling a bit at the moment, but have managed the above 3. I will try and add some more.
    00bwtI-542172284.jpg
     
  40. And here are some which are near perfect exposure. Two shots of a house/roses - 1st one taken with camera doing the work - assuming it was working correctly. The 2nd assuming shutter firing at 1/500 sec, and used appropriate aperture from using a light meter.
    00bwtM-542172384.jpg
     
  41. Looks like I am getting the photos uploaded, but too large a file ? When clicking the attachment it opens up in another window. Probably get it right eventually.
    00bwtO-542172484.jpg
     
  42. If I have done anything incorrectly re the uploading of the photos, my apologies. But if anyone has any observations re what is happening, I would be grateful.
    Thanks.
     
  43. Tape your hinge and see if that helps.
     
  44. Frederick, that's a light leak, probably at the hinge door. It's very similar to what I showed in my "light leak" thread linked above (link repeated).
    My solution: add seal material at the hinge (sticky-back velvet or foam).
     
  45. Jim, and Sebastian, Thank you both for that suggestion, and I will give that a try. I have seen your 'light leak' thread, and will go into that fully.
    Sebastian now just had a look at your link, and things are becoming a little clearer for me. If I am correct in my asumption, the camera is taking close to perfect shots, and then when the film is wound on, when a properly exposed frame is 'stationary' near the door hinge, - that is the time when light is getting to the frame. Yes, that makes sense to me now. Perhaps at times I have had my right hand over the door-hinge area, preventing light getting inside. I had been assuming that light was getting to the frame when it was directly behind the lens.
     
  46. Frederick, I think you've got it. At least, that's what I discovered.
    For the benefit of others reading along, my test was: shoot two frames, wind through four blank frames, leave camera in the light for a couple of days with frame 7 behind the lens, then wind-on a couple more blanks. Here's what the developed film looked like. (Some dark right at the edges are typical for me with my bulk-loaded film.)
    [​IMG]
    My interpretation:
    - A is the primary light leak, from door hinge onto the take-up spool.
    - B is print-through of sproket holes at A onto the film one layer down on the take-up spool.
    - C is the film at or near the advance sprocket, light going behind the take-up spool and then through the anti-halation backing? The thin dark line to the left of C is real and repeatable; what is it?
     
  47. Very savvy test, Sebastian. As for the line next to C, I am stumped at the moment. It looks very precise.
     
  48. The line next to C? Looking at the geometry, it's next to the edge of the pressure plate. I don't know.
     

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