Windows 7

Discussion in 'Digital Darkroom' started by mike_brown|16, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. It would seem this would all be a lot easier by now, but...
    I just purchased a new HP desktop. When I hooked everything all up and turned it on, all worked fine, except..
    I have an NEC P221w monitor, and the devices page on Windows 7 does not recognize it. It only shows it as a Generic Non PnP monitor. The maximum resolution will only go to 1600X1200 and there is distortion to images when displayed. Also, the SpectraView calibration software does not recognize that there is an NEC monitor connected to the computer. Any thoughts on solving both of these issues?
    Thanks in advance,
    m
     
  2. That display should be natively supported by Windows 7. The question is whether or not the video board/chipset built into that new HP machine can exceed 1600x1200 pixels. You might need to add a third-party video board for higher resolution.
     
  3. What Matt said... or maybe you just need the right driver.
     
  4. Have you checked the NEC website for an updated Win7 driver?
    - Leigh
     
  5. The problem seems to be that it doesn't recognize the monitor as an NEC, It only sees it as a generic monitor, and so won't recognize the NEC driver software that I downloaded in an attempt to get it to recognize it.
     
  6. When you install Windows 7, it doesn't have all the drivers loaded. Make sure you install all the updates offered through the Update Managers, and I bet you'll find it has been downloaded.
     
  7. Before any driver is loaded, the system will send inquiries to the monitor asking it for ID information. The monitor should respond with info that identifies itself as a NEC P221W. That info is used by Windows to select the right driver. Generic non-PnP monitor is the default when Windows gets back no info about the monitor.
    The cause is certainly hardware. The possible culprits are a bad port on the computer, a bad port on the monitor or a bad cable between the two ports. The trouble shooting steps would be
    1. Use a known good cable from another system to see if it is a bad cable.
    2. Use a known good monitor from another system to see if it is bad monitor.
    3. If the above two do not work, it is probably the port on the computer.
    Danny Low
     
  8. If Win7 is allowing you to select 1600x1200, then that's where the distortion is coming from - the aspect ratio is wrong (and it can't achieve that resolution). Select the native resolution of 1680x1050 and it'll be all good.
     
  9. Are you using a DVI cable to connect your monitor to the PC? If you are using a 15 pin analog VGA cable it may not provide optimum results.
     
  10. Thanks everybody for your advice so far.
    Danny,
    The cable is the same one I used on the old computer as is the monitor itself, the only difference is that it requires an adaptor to fit the back of the HP computer. I would think if the port is bad, the monitor would not work at all.
    Frank and Charles,
    Because it is only recognizing it as a generic monitor, it only allows me to select up to 1600X1200. It has a vertical slider to select the ratios, and that is the highest choice.
    Matt,
    When I try to run the SpectraView calibration software that comes with it, it also doesn't recognize that there is an NEC monitor connected to the computer. I would think that if it were the board/ chipset, it would still be recognized by SpectraView. It's puzzling.
    Thanks again,
    m
     
  11. Mark,
    I just checked the back of the monitor and it is a VGA cable coming out of the back to an adaptor for DVI to the computer. Would this keep the computer from recognizing the specific type of monitor?
    m
     
  12. "I just checked the back of the monitor and it is a VGA cable coming out of the back to an adaptor for DVI to the computer. Would this keep the computer from recognizing the specific type of monitor?"
    That is exactly the cause of your problem. The monitor should have both a DVI and VGA connector. You should be using the DVI connector only and connecting directly to the DVI connector on the computer with no converter.
    Danny

     
  13. Thanks to everybody for your help and input. I replaced the cable with a straight DVI cable and the problem is solved, both the resolution issue and the SpectraView recognition problem. All is right with the world.
    m
     
  14. I have that same monitor on a 64bit Win 7 machine, and it works very well.
    Assuming you are going to use the monitor to match printer output, may I suggest you consider making one of your monitor profiles with reduced brightness, about 90cd/mm. Works for me with my Epson R2400.
     
  15. Dave, thanks for the suggestion. I have an Epson 3800 and will give it a try.
    m
     

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