Will this scratch affect the images?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by anuragagnihotri, Dec 20, 2012.

  1. Hi,
    I can buy this 180 2.8 AIS...but it has a scratch in the rear element.
    Price is about 100 pounds.
    ??
    anurag
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. A scratch like that is going to cause flare and might reduce the lens's sharpness. However, 100 pounds is about half the normal price for that lens, so it might be worth a shot.
     
  3. pge

    pge

    Will this scratch affect the images?​
    I bet it will.
     
  4. Are you sure it is a scratch? And to answer your question probably not as much as you think
     
  5. Yes its a scratch...the seller says so
     
  6. And just for a little more fun check out this short article.
    http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2008/10/front-element-scratches
     
  7. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    That is a fairly old lens. You should be able to find another one in mint condition and still won't cost you all that much. I would avoid this lens. Regardless the scratch will affect your images much or not, it will be extra hard to sell should you want to unload it in the future. Why buy someone else's problem?
     
  8. Michael, this one is on rear element...
     
  9. Take a #000 sable brush, and paint the scratch with flat black model paint.
     
  10. Yes Anurag. I understand that it is on the rear element. What I was trying to show was that at times there is no need to obsess about very small things like the dust that is also on the rear element of the lens and the scratch.
    And with that said I would probably pass on this copy of this lens. With just a fast look on the bay I have seen a couple that are going for fair prices with out the scratch.
    And Les is right if you paint the scratch it will be gone as far as the camera is concerned. But again I would not but a lens knowing I would have to do that.
     
  11. thanks peoples :)
     
  12. If the scratch were on the front element I would not be as worried. Scratches on the rear element of lenses have a far greater chance of affecting the image. I would at least try the image to test it out and if it is a problem another used copy of the lens should not be too hard to find, as Shun said.
    -O
     
  13. Despite its age, these in nice shape are far from giveaway priced today, as a quick look at the Big Auction site listings will quickly prove. Aside from the rear element issue, this example looks very rough. I'd keep looking.
     
  14. Black India ink from a pen will work better than a brush for the scratch, I think - If you can find a Rapidograph® pen, it's just the thing. Sharpies don't have enough pigment in them for this.
    However, being right in the middle, the scratch probably will affect the image at least a little, even darkened to reduce flare, etc.
     
  15. I wouldn't buy it for 100 pounds. 25 maybe and try the ink trick. It will affect the image.
     
  16. Check the prices on eBay for this lens unscratched. AIS versions are often going for less than US$150 for ones in good shape. AI and earlier, even less. As Louis says, GBP100 is way too high for what is a damaged lens.
     
  17. "You should be able to find another one in mint condition and still won't cost you all that much."
    Depends on what you consider "all that much". ;-)
    I have seen really nice samples of the AiS 180/2.8ED (the Ai model is an optically different lens) go for up to $400-$450 recently. Most sell for at least $200 if they aren't beaters. Finding a nice one for $150 or less is a challenge, and prices in Europe tend to be higher.
    Having said that, yes you will likely see some impact in some situations given that the scratch is dead center on the rear element. But not as bad as one might expect, particularly since it's a telephoto. Inking out the scratch will minimize flare problems. Whether the reduced price is enough of a bargain is up to you I guess. It will definitely affect resale value and buyer interest if you eventually decide to sell or trade it.
    Some months back I did a test where I stuck a large piece of "dirt" (much bigger than the above scratch) on the rear element of a DX Nikkor 18~70mm lens. The results were "interesting". See this page, starting at Jul 04, 2012; 02:38 p.m.:
    http://www.photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00aZgU
     
  18. "I have seen really nice samples of the AiS 180/2.8ED (the Ai model is an optically different lens) go for up to $400-$450 recently. Most sell for at least $200 if they aren't beaters. Finding a nice one for $150 or less is a challenge, and prices in Europe tend to be higher."
    Yup. I got a mint AiS copy nearly 8 years ago for just south of $300 and felt lucky. Anyone who thinks these come cheap solely due to age doesn't get out much.
     
  19. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Depends on what you consider "all that much". ;-)
    I have seen really nice samples of the AiS 180/2.8ED (the Ai model is an optically different lens) go for up to $400-$450 recently. Most sell for at least $200 if they aren't beaters. Finding a nice one for $150 or less is a challenge, and prices in Europe tend to be higher.​
    Right, I made it vague on purpose. For a nice but old f2.8 telephoto lens, I don't think paying $200 to $300 is all that much. For a lens that is optically and mechanically sound, there are ballpark guidelines for its value (except for perhaps collector's items). For something that has a clear damage, the value can vary widely depending on you can find that one buyer you need or you get it repaired, which involves parts availability issues for something old.
    In this case, 100 pounds simply makes no sense, and you can easily be stuck with it with a hard time to resell. As I said, there is no point to spend anywhere close to 100 Pounds to buy someone else's problem.
     
  20. There is a simple correction to over-estimates on lens "value" - it's called the market. Look at completed sales on eBay. Completed, not "asked" but unsold.
    It's true that the AIS ED version has sometimes sold for high prices (>$250), but it is not uncommon to find others sold at below $200 in good working condition.
    By the way, there is nothing wrong with the earlier Nikkor 180mm - a re-creation, as I recall, of the famous and classic Zeiss Sonnar 180mm f/2.8 Olympia
     
  21. "By the way, there is nothing wrong with the earlier Nikkor 180mm..."
    Agree completely. I owned one of those for several years.
     
  22. Am going to check the lens personally...lets see
     
  23. You could ask the seller to send you some pictures at different apertures taken with this lens and check them. I think this would be the easiest way to answer your question.
     
  24. yes, the best thing to do is try it yourself - even better if you had a good copy to compare it to.
    My personal experience with scratches is this. Back element scratches on wide angles - bad; back element scratches with telephotos - no big deal and I don't even black them out. I find that I have a tendency to stop the wide angles down more and the scratches show up while I use the telephotos opened up. Flare has only been an issue with multiple scratches(I have a 105 with a back element that looks like someone sandpapered it - image is still there but severely soft) One time I received a Vivitar Series I 90-180 flat field and while opening it, scratched the back element. I got a second non-scratched copy and no difference. I probably have every scratched lens I have ever purchased and some of them have been used pretty heavy.
    Anyway, try the lens. You might like it.
     
  25. I had a 90mm macro with a larger mark on it than that. The images from that lens were sharp and free of flare. I think it will make no difference.
     

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