Will projecting my Leica slides ruin them?

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by steve_hoffman, Nov 15, 2000.

  1. Just finished reading a somewhat forgotten Leica book entitled "Leica 35mm Color Magic" by Walther Benser. Great color photo tips, 1956 style. Charming in that "Bygone era" sort of way. He stresses that projecting chromes not enclosed in glass will ruin them. Is this true with today's E-6? Can any of you experts advise what to do. I have been told that encasing chromes in glass is a total waste of time and money. Experts??
     
  2. Today's E6 films can take projection very well, Kodachrome,
    unfortunately, and older E4 films will shift noticably with
    projection. If you are using Kodachrome and older E4, and they
    will be projected extensively, then make and project dupes. For
    casual amateur use, say ten to twenty seconds of projection
    every two years, I would not lose any sleep over it. However even
    with this light use, by the time you go to the great darkroom in the
    sky, Kodachrome and the older E4, will have shifted noticably.

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    Cheers
     
  3. Equally, of course we should add that E6 films are generally thought
    not to archive as well as Kodachromes in the dark, so you cannot win
    really. The only real way to get "lifetime plus" archivability is
    perhaps to shoot black and white silver emulsions. Personally I have
    been shooting and projecting Kodachromes from 1976 and have not
    noticed any appreciable change since then, so I do not worry at
    present. I agree that putting slides into glass in general is a waste
    of time and will only increase your chances of fungal growth, but on
    the other hand it is the only way to get real edge to edge ultimate
    sharpness in any projector and that includes my Leica Pradovits
    CA2502 and P2000, which are the best projectors out there in my
    experience. I do not mount in glass generally myself.
     
  4. I've read all the statistics about how much projection Kodachrome can take, but from a practical point of view, this is pretty much a fade proof film (over a lifetime) unless you view your slides month after month through the years. My Dad has 50 yr old Kodachrome slides that look as good as new, and people I know have slides from the late 1930s that look fresh as they day they were taken...
    As for archiving slides, as I understand it, the best solution is cold storage, which will greatly extend their life, to centuries. This is now routinely done for movie film and for some important collections. A simple home implementation, would be to buy a deep freeze (the ultra cold type) and put everything inside in water/humidity proof packaging.
    More information at
    Cold_Storage/cold_storage.html>http://www.wilhelm- research.com/Cold_Storage/cold_storage.html
    Be sure to read/download the .pdf file.
     
  5. Steve, according to The Source Book: Kodak Ektagraphic Slide
    Projectors, Eastman Kodak Co., 1984,
    "For most viewing purposes, pictorial slides made on properly
    processed Kodak color films will be acceptable through 3 to 4 hours
    of total projection time. This is true when the slides are used in
    an EKTAGRAPHIC III or EKTAGRAPHIC slide projector that is equipped
    with a tungsten-filament lamp and had unrestricted air circulation,
    even if the projector is operated with the power-selector switch set
    at HIGH." (p.154).

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    But, this is only a generalization, because slide life is roughly
    proportional to light intensity. It is difficult to give an exact
    figure, because "there are too many variables, such as proper
    processing, adequate projector ventilation, ambient temperature, and
    so on. However, the film types . . . does not make a significant
    difference . . ."(p.153)

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    And note: > ". . . [slides] will change somewhat less if projected
    continuously for a given time rather than intermittently until the
    same projection time is reached." (p.154).

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    Hope this helps.
     

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