Which monolights Hypersync to 1/8000th w/Nikon D3s + MiniTT1/FlexTT5 set-up?

Discussion in 'Lighting Equipment' started by studio460, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. I understand the basic limitations of focal-plane shutters, the power-draining effects of camera manufacturer's "High-Speed FP Sync" feature, and the basic principle behind LPA Design's PocketWizard Hypersync feature (which, I know is different from High-Speed FP Sync). But LPA's Hypersync feature appears to perform differently with both different bodies and different studio strobes.

    A photographer's website located here: http://www.lebryk.com/category/pocket-wizard/ describes many Hypersync-photographed images, using a Dynalite Uni400JR strobe, attaining bar-free images at speeds up to 1/8,000th of a second with his D3s + MiniTT1 + FlexTT5 (where I assume he used his TT5 as a simple RF remote trigger, since the Dynalite doesn't support remote power control via the TT5).

    However, in another photographer's blog, located here: http://tombolphoto.com/blog/elinchrom-ranger-using-pocketwizard-hypersync-18000-sync-speed-possible/ he indicates that he was able to attain a 1/8,000th of a second sync with his D300 and an Elinchrom Ranger, but only 1/320th with his D3.

    So, since the maximum, bar-free, Hypersync sync speed is strobe-dependent, and the maximum sync speed appears to vary widely among both different manufacturer's strobes, and differing camera bodies, I was wondering if anyone else here who owns a Nikon D3s has any experience in attaining sync speeds significantly higher than 1/250th using the PocketWizard MiniTT1/FlexTT5 (as Lebryk demonstrated with his D3s and a Dynalite monobloc). I am only interested in monolights (my Speedlights Hypersync fine at 1/8,000th). I suppose I'm looking for the monolight with the longest "tail."

    While the Dynalite is the only strobe I could find to actually be documented to Hypersync problem-free at 1/8,000th, specifically with a Nikon D3s, it would be nice to find another monobloc which syncs as fast, yet also supports the remote power control capability of the FlexTT5.
    Thanks for any replies!
     
  2. You need a strobe with a slow flash duration because the strobe "flash" needs to illuminate the subject during the time it takes the camera to expose a 1/8000s shot (which takes around 1/250s or so depending on how fast the shutter curtains move).
    So any strobe that is good for freezing action would be bad for hypersync. Since the Dynalite Uni400JR is spec'd at 1/675s at full power any monolight around 1/675s or slower should work just the same.

    Usually standard monolights have a longer flash duration (t=0.1) when used at lower power settings. The spec's usually mention t=0.5 which is shorter though so it's easy to get the wrong impression. What I'm getting at is that if a strobe doesn't hypersync well at full power it might at a lower power setting.
    Also note that strobes that are IGBT controlled like the Einstein is not good for hypersync.
     
  3. I said . . .
    . . . it would be nice to find another monobloc which syncs as fast, yet also supports the remote power control capability of the FlexTT5.​
    Where what I meant was, "it would be nice to find another monobloc which syncs as fast, yet also supports the remote power control capability of the [MiniTT1, with either a built-in, or added ControlTL receiver for that specific monolight]."
     
  4. Pete said . . .
    You need a strobe with a slow flash duration because the strobe "flash" needs to illuminate the subject during the time it takes the camera to expose a 1/8000s shot (which takes around 1/250s or so depending on how fast the shutter curtains move).​
    Yes! Precisely!
    Usually standard monolights have a longer flash duration (t=0.1) when used at lower power settings. The spec's usually mention t=0.5 which is shorter though so it's easy to get the wrong impression. What I'm getting at is that if a strobe doesn't hypersync well at full power it might at a lower power setting.​
    Thank you for that detailed and informed reply! Yes, so the trick is to interpret the manufacturer's specs correctly? What T value am I looking for? A higher numeric T value, or a lower one?
    Also note that strobes that are IGBT controlled like the Einstein is not good for hypersync.​
    Yes, thanks, I'm aware of that. Thanks again for your help!
     
  5. I said . . .
    Yes, so the trick is to interpret the manufacturer's specs correctly? What T value am I looking for? A higher numeric T value, or a lower one?​
    So, I did some learnin' about T.1/T.5 values and what they mean, and I think I'm getting it. I'm sure I'll have another dumb question to post here in a few hours.
     
  6. Okay, for example, the Alien Bees B1600 spec sheet states a T.1 value of 1/600th at full-power, but a T.5 value of only 1/1,800th at full power. According to other posts here, if the manufacturer gives only a single duration value in their spec sheet (as Dynalite's only does), they're most likely quoting the T.5 value. In the case of the Dynalite, it merely states a 1/675th duration at full-power, which, if following that advice, would be a T.5 value of 1/675th, a speed significantly longer than the B1600's T.5 spec of 1/1,800th. Therefore, the Dynalite monobloc would be superior at attaining higher maximum Hypersync speeds over the B1600. Does this sound correct?
     
  7. Therefore, the Dynalite monobloc would be superior at attaining higher maximum Hypersync speeds over the B1600. Does this sound correct?​
    Yes, that sounds correct .
    Also keep in mind that the t.1 and t.5 units are seconds. So 1/675 is 1/675th of a second. The t.1 value is usually around three times slower than the t.5 as a rule of thumb. So in this case around 1/225s.
     
  8. Hi Ralph,
    First of all why are you looking to sync a moonlight or even a pack and head system at very short shutter speeds? In
    my trials and tests and actual work with the ControlTL system and non smart speedlights what I have found is both the
    camera body and the flash are factors n how high a shutter is usable. You and Steve are on the right track with
    looking for flashes with long t0.1 FD ( 1/250 or longer) times but the trigger circuity in the light is also a factor. Using
    ControlTL gear I can get a Profoto 6B (600 w-s ) battery powered flash to give me a full frame sync up to 1/3200
    shutterspeed on an EOS-1D mkIV , but can't get above 1/500 with other flashes which I know have very long t0.1 FD
    (longer than 1/100) at full power when using the same body or different models or makes of cameras.

    As of today, the Speedlight / Speedlite flashes that have a ControlTL receiver are the Einstein (PowerMC2), the other
    Paul C Buff flashes (AC9 receiver) and Elinchroms with a connection for an external Skyport receiver ( PowerST2
    receiver). I know that Profoto and LPA design are working on a dual Profoto Air / ControlTL system but don't know
    what form that will take.
     
  9. Hey there, Ellis. Thanks for your reply. Well, I want to drop my ambient/background exposure two to three stops or more, and key with a battery-powered monolight. Ideally, with enough power to shoot it through a softbox. I know that's not likely to happen with only a 400Ws head, however. I basically went through the specs of every monolight in the B+H catalog over the last few hours and found only one or two likely candidates with long flash durations.
    I saw that someone had a PocketWizard "card," but that only gave you remote triggering--no remote power control. So, as you mention, there's really no long-duration flash head with PocketWizard power control right now. Unfortunately, the Elinchroms and Einsteins are simply too fast, and others have reported only modest increases in max shutter speeds (e.g., 1/320th) with the Elinchroms under Hypersync control. That's fine. I'm sure either full- or half-power, through the right amount of diffusion will get me in the ballpark 99% of the time. And yeah, it's weird how even just different bodies give different max shutter speeds while still using the identical outboard gear.
     
  10. Wouldn't it be easier with some neutral density filters and more powerful lights or a camera with leaf shutter? Of course in the case of a leaf shutter, you'll still need strobes with a short enough flash duration.
     
  11. "you'll still need strobes with a short enough flash duration."
    No. you'll need a flash with a long enough FD to last the entire shutter cycle.
     
  12. With regard to overpowering daylight by 2-3 stops, there's a fundamental issue you have to be aware of with the whole "hypersync + long duration studio flash" setup. Once you cross over beyond the shutter sync speed, you are only using a portion of the strobe's light as the shutter slit moves across the frame. Since the strobe lasts as long as the entire duration that the shutter is moving (roughly 1/250, even with faster shutter speeds) it starts to act like ambient light. This means that your ratio of sunlight to strobe doesn't change as you increase your shutter speed. So, this method does not help you overpower the sun. It will allow you to shoot with a wider aperture, but won't help you change the ratio of flash to ambient. Functionally, it's just an alternative to an ND filter so you don't have to stop way down.
    Ellis - I think Marc was talking about the option of using a leaf shutter, in which case he is correct that the OP would need a short enough flash duration so that it could fully fire within the shutter speed.
     
  13. This means that your ratio of sunlight to strobe doesn't change as you increase your shutter speed.
    Oh sure it does -- it all depends on the energy level your lights are at and their proximity to your subject.
    Both frames in the attached pair were shot with the same lights (A Profoto 600B and a 580 EX II ) at ISo 100. The one on the left was exposed at ƒ/7.1 and 1/300. The one on the right was exposed at f/5.6 @ 1/2,500.​
    00YrcN-367647584.jpg
     
  14. Okay, I should have been a little less absolute. I'm sure that there will be some subtle variations in the exposure. My point is that with shooting beyond the sync speed you lose the traditional control between shutter speed controlling ambient and aperture controlling flash, and that it is LESS efficient than shooting within the sync speed if your goal is to overpower sunlight.
    The sync timing of the PW systems allow you to exploit the maximum possible shutter sync speed. With the 1D IV, the default sync is 1/320 and with precisely dialed in timing you can get almost another half stop, without throwing away any of the strobe's light or needing to use a long duration flash. The shutter is open all the way at the very exact time the strobe fires, at the maximum possible shutter speed before the shutter starts "getting in the way" of the light from the strobe. This is the point of greatest efficiency, because 100% of the light from the strobe is getting to the camera sensor.
    Once you cross beyond this point of maximum efficiency to faster and faster shutter speeds, the shutter is now a "moving slit", and although the strobe flash duration lasts the entire time that the shutter is moving, some portion of that light from the strobe is being blocked from hitting the sensor because the shutter is in the way. When you increase shutter speed further, you are just making the shutter slit narrower and are blocking a larger and larger percentage of the light from the flash.
    So point where you've got the greatest ability to overpower the sun happens right at that "maximum sync speed". You don't need a short duration flash or a long duration flash to take advantage of this, because the shutter is 100% open and 100% of the light gets to the sensor. By virtue of the physics, the shutter speeds beyond this point cannot improve your ratio of flash to ambient, because you are starting to block light from the flash from getting to the sensor.
    What your example photo shows is that the 1D IV was not yet at it's most efficient sync speed for the picture on the left because it was under the native sync speed and even further under the "ideal" sync speed you could achieve with dialing in the PW timings. You still had room to increase the shutter speed to block out more ambient without affecting your key light. Once you crossed that "ideal sync speed", you've gone beyond the point of maximum efficiency, and you aren't going to get any more improvement in your strobe power over the ambient. This is partly why you see your key light being darker in the photo on the right, even though you've opened the aperture. If you were to have increased your shutter speed from 1/2500 to 1/5000 for the photo on the right, you would have seen a roughly equal darkening of both the sky in the background and of the key light on his face.
    Anyways, here's my takeaway. The Pocketwizard system is great. It allows you to exploit that last little bit of sync speed from your camera, and to be as efficient as possible with any strobes (short or long duration). The whole long tail strobe/hypersync/shutter speed well beyond the sync speed endeavor is a totally different animal. It doesn't help you overpower ambient, it just allows you to shoot with more open apertures without having to use an ND filter.
     
  15. All good points Sheldon except that the sun , on a more less cloud free day, is at a fixed brightness. We can always add more lights to the mix . Add a head wit the same energy doubles the light we have to work with, and we can change reflectors to concentrate the light we have in a more focused beam.
     
  16. Absolutely. With most studio strobes you've got ample power to overpower the sun, especially up close or with an efficient modifier. My points are really only about situations where you've already turned the strobe up to max power and are looking to find a way to further underexpose the ambient light while keeping the strobe exposure/modifier/distance constant. For example if you want to run a 3x4' softbox at 8 feet with a 400 watt/second strobe and compete with daylight, you'd probably be looking for a way to find more power.
    Most people seem to be very curious about the hypersync approach as a way to "beat out the ambient", when in reality it doesn't accomplish that purpose.
    The only real reasons to use it would be to change your shooting aperture for shallower depth of field (alternative to an ND filter), or if you needed to have a shorter shutter speed to freeze a moving subject that was being illuminated by both ambient and strobe.
     
  17. Mark said:
    Wouldn't it be easier with some neutral density filters and more powerful lights or a camera with leaf shutter? Of course in the case of a leaf shutter, you'll still need strobes with a short enough flash duration.​
    Thanks for your reply, Mark. Well, I was looking specifically to control ambient exposure by adjusting shutter speed. Spinning a thumbwheel on my body is simply much faster than changing screw-in ND filters (although a matte box would make those changes quicker). And, yes, I did consider using an MFDB for these photos, for both increased image quality, and for having the option to use leaf-shutter lenses. I looked at both the Mamiya 645DF and Hasselblad H4D, but at those prices, I would have to rent rather than own. I'd rather own my gear. I made a decision a while back to stick to FX-format gear for its convenience. Plus the leaf-shutter lenses I was looking into didn't seem to go that high anyway.
     
  18. Pete said:
    Yes, that sounds correct.​
    Thanks for checking my work! Looks like I have this almost figured out.
    The t.1 value is usually around three times slower than the t.5 as a rule of thumb. So in this case around 1/225s.​
    Cool! Thanks for your help!
     
  19. Sheldon said:
    My point is that with shooting beyond the sync speed you lose the traditional control between shutter speed controlling ambient and aperture controlling flash, and that it is LESS efficient than shooting within the sync speed if your goal is to overpower sunlight.​
    Thanks for your reply, Sheldon. I understand that I'm losing flash power by employing Hypersync, and I'm willing to give that up for the benefits gained. Also, I won't be controlling my flash exposure via my aperture. In my application, I will be adjusting ambient exposure with shutter speed, and setting aperture arbitrarily (and, adjusting ISO to accommodate that arbitrary choice), since that will be determined by aesthetic design. I'll be controlling my flash by either varying power, varying flash-to-subject distance, and/or varying the type and size of modifier.
     
  20. Sheldon said:
    For example if you want to run a 3x4' softbox at 8 feet with a 400 watt/second strobe and compete with daylight, you'd probably be looking for a way to find more power.​
    Yes, I agree, 400Ws isn't likely going to cut it. I was on a daylight exterior set (magazine editorial) a few weeks ago where the photographer set up two 2,400Ws studio-pack strobes through a 12' x 12' polysilk to illuminate a group of subjects who were backlit by direct, mid-afternoon sun. He said he wished he had two 4800Ws packs instead.
     
  21. Ellis said:
    Both frames in the attached pair were shot with the same lights (A Profoto 600B and a 580 EX II ) at ISo 100. The one on the left was exposed at ƒ/7.1 and 1/300. The one on the right was exposed at f/5.6 @ 1/2,500.​
    Thanks for posting those, Ellis! I assume the Profoto was at full-power (600Ws). Do you mind sharing the flash-to-subject distance, and the type and size of modifier used?
     
  22. Long-Duration Monolights:
    After a lengthy review of various monolights, from what I could gather, here are the longest-duration, 120VAC monobloc strobes, among the most commonly distributed brands sold in the U.S. Listed from longest-to-shortest flash duration, at full power [note: since 't' values weren't specified, it's assumed that all data pertains to their respective t=0.5 values]:

    1. Speedotron Force 5 $699 USD
    Full power = CONSTANT 1/500th
    2. Dynalite Uni400JR $598 USD
    Full power = 1/675th
    1/2 power = 1/1,100th
    1/4 power =1/1,800th
    1/8 power = 1/2,200th
    3. Speedotron Force 10 $794 USD
    Full power = CONSTANT 1/850th
    4. Bowens Gemini 500R $579 USD
    Full power = 1/900th
    One photographer (referenced earlier) reported up to 1/8,000th Hypersync shutter speed with a Nikon D3s using a Dynalite Uni400JR at full power. Lesser shutter speeds, although still very high, were reported at half power. I could find no Hypersync user reports regarding actual performance data for the Speedotron Force 5/10 series. Various Canon users have reported only modest shutter speed increases with the Bowens Gemini 500R. Also, note that your mileage will definitely vary depending on the specific camera body used (i.e., the identical monobloc will result in differing maximum Hypersync speeds, when used with different bodies).
     
  23. Sheldon Nalos:
    Most people seem to be very curious about the hypersync approach as a way to "beat out the ambient", when in reality it doesn't accomplish that purpose.​
    It does work as a way to "beat out the ambient", but you need to find the right equipment to work together to make it work.
    There are compromises to be made too which could be mitigated by simply having enough flash power in the first place (which is the easy way to do it) until you find the right flash equipment to provide you some benefit.
    Here's a test I did with a D3x and SB900 showing that Hypersync can provide a higher flash sync whilst maintaining the same aperture, f10 in this case:
    [​IMG]
    Depending on how much your compromise will run to will depend on how much benefit you will obtain. For the intended use I had for these, I was prepared to compromise up to 1/800s and obtain about +1.6 stops benefit, it's fair to say I wasn't intending to do any copy work with this, so it would have been an informed choice to use the benefit if it was required, but ultimately, I wasn't prepared to put up with all the other idiosyncrasies as well.
    Compared to the HSS hack this Hypersync solution provides benefit up to a certain point, and only with certain flash equipment, that flash equipment needs a relatively short flash duration. This short flash duration is neccesary to maintain the brightest output (but unfortunately, because this output cannot be maintained over the shutter duration, it's this which causes the graduation) longer flash durations don't provide this increased benefit and only equate to a balanced flash/ambient ratio equivalent to that obtained at max X-sync.
    If anybody has results from any monolights they've tried rather than just quoting the flash duration times, I'd be interested in seeing them. Particularly if they specifically use Hypersync with an associated increase in output, rather than just an equivalent HSS hack which (in general) only maintains full x-sync ratio.
     
  24. CORRECTION:
    1. Speedotron Force 5 $699 USD
    Full power = CONSTANT 1/500th​
    This information is incorrect. The B+H site apparently has a typo in the Force 5's specifications tab. According to both the Speedotron Force 5 product user manual PDF and the Speedotron website, the flash duration for the Speedotron Force 5 is 1/1,500th, not 1/500th. And, this is a constant 1/1,500th, thoughout its power range, according to the manufacturer. [Note: the spec for the Force 10 is accurate: 1/850th, constant.]
     
  25. Ian said:
    Compared to the HSS hack this Hypersync solution provides benefit up to a certain point, and only with certain flash equipment, that flash equipment needs a relatively short flash duration.​
    Okay, now I'm confused.

    Ian also said:
    If anybody has results from any monolights they've tried rather than just quoting the flash duration times, I'd be interested in seeing them. Particularly if they specifically use Hypersync with an associated increase in output, rather than just an equivalent HSS hack which (in general) only maintains full x-sync ratio.​
    I have no real-world data to share since I'm still trying to figure out which monolight is going to benefit most from the use of Hypersync. Here are the only data I could find (which I previously posted), mentioning specific camera bodies and specific monolights.
    I said, previously:
    A photographer's website located here: http://www.lebryk.com/category/pocket-wizard/ describes many Hypersync-photographed images, using a Dynalite Uni400JR strobe, attaining bar-free images at speeds up to 1/8,000th of a second with his D3s + MiniTT1 + FlexTT5.

    However, in another photographer's blog, located here: http://tombolphoto.com/blog/elinchrom-ranger-using-pocketwizard-hypersync-18000-sync-speed-possible/ he indicates that he was able to attain a 1/8,000th of a second sync with his D300 and an Elinchrom Ranger, but only [1/500th] with his D3.​
    Your further comments on the site examples from the above links are most welcome.
     
  26. There's Hypersync - which can increase your x-sync speed and can provide additional output benefit over the maximum ratio to daylight that you can achieve at x-sync.. like the example I shown with the D3x and SB900, where at f10 there is little change in overall exposure (in the 'subject' area), but a -1.6 stop benefit over ambient (by the fact that 1/800s can be used instead of 1/250s).
    And there's Hypersync which doesn't afford this benefit, but still changes the sync point to one simulating an original HSS sync point.
    The Hypersync which doesn't provide the additional benefit is freely available by using the HSS hack to switch your flash sync from triggering when your shutter is completely open - to triggering when your shutter STARTS to open. This is the regular HSS sync timing point, and one which PW switches to by default after any Hypersync advantage has been exploited, unless it's switched off, and then you get banding as I illustrated.
    Your links to tombol illustrate the use of Hypersync to advance the sync timing, but uses the long burn of the flash. There looks to be clipping on the right hand side of the last image, or it could be that the flash head is so close that it's the limit of the reflector... That's not really an issue, but ISO 200, 1/8000 at F5 is not any greater than 1/250s f25, which the Ranger is easily capable of without Hypersync., so any 'beating out the ambient' there - doesn't exist.
     
  27. The kind of light volume falloff you will get in either Nikon's FP or Canon's HSS mode is very dependent on the aperture you have chosen to shoot at. a larger diameter aperture means a larger range in shutter speeds in either FP or HSS sync modes.
    ISO 200, 1/8000 at F5 is not any greater than 1/250s f25
    As far as the numbers go, quite possibly. But there is one obvious problem: ƒ/25. it is a problem because what if I do not want work at f/25 because I want shallower depth of field? What if I don't like working at ƒ/25 because I do not like the loss of resolved detail due to diffraction? What if the lenses I use do not stop down to ƒ/25?
    The response will be: Then lower the power the output energy level on the Elinchrom Ranger. Okay. but if you are shooting outdoors in bright sunlight , not at dawn or dusk that ambient light exposure at ISO 125 for a shutter speed of 1/250th will be right around f/11. So what do you propose that a photographer do if he wants to shoot at an aperture larger than f/11 and have the background not overexposed?
     
  28. The response will not be 'Then lower the power the output energy level on the Elinchrom Ranger'.
    The response will be - in the case of the OP, and Nikon.. Stick a speedlight on the hotshoe, turn the Ranger up to full power and set f11 @ whatever shutterspeed works for the modifiers employed. Choose a radio transmitter and fit it to the PC sync with a receiver on the Ranger. Shoot.
    Here's one I've done previously with a softbox as an example, without a speedlight on the camera, just using the Quantum FreeXwire radio system.. other radio systems work the same way I mentioned, so too does a slave cell, but less efficiently.. just choose your aperture:[​IMG]
    The model was stepped forward in the last shot just to get to 1/8000s. Take off the softbox and you can underexpose the ambient a couple of stops.
    You can do the same with speedlights and not have the HSS or FP mode penalty - meaning - you lose no physical output.
     
  29. Ian:
    Thank you for your detailed and well-illustrated replies! I'm afraid I'll have to re-read them several more times, since I think I'm getting lost. (I realize you were merely illustrating a point, but I'm likely to shoot my daylight exterior Hypersync images at apertures significantly larger than f/25 or f/11, as demonstrated by your later examples). Also, I'm not sure why you would recommend that I stick a Speedlight in my hotshoe. My specific application would be similar to your second demo: large softbox or silk, using a Dynalite Uni400JR and/or Speedotron Force 10 monolight. If I used a Speedlight at all, it would only be off-camera as an accent or backlight (if it would even read at those levels). Again, I have to re-read your posts to better understand your examples.
     
  30. Sticking a speedlight on your hotshoe fools the camera into resetting the x-sync to the moment the sensor starts to be exposed. If you're using a Mini or Flex already this won't be neccesary as these will do that for you with an added sync time adjustment.
    I think some confusion arises with the term 'Hypersync' which at best can increase the ability to combat high ambient light by using relatively short flash durations if you're willing to compromise, and at worst doesn't work and introduces banding. It can then default to provide the same level of flash/ambient as the HSS hack will. All this with a caveat of which camera system, camera model and flash equipment is used.
    If you take f16@1/250s as a starting point, all of the following are possible using the hack:
    f11@1/500s
    f8@1/1000s
    f5.6@1/2000s
    f4@1/4000s
    f2.8@1/8000s
    No additional ambient beating ability is present there, although even with 'slow' burning flashes I've seen significant increases in 'ambient beating' where the shutterspeeds are approaching the upper limits.
     
  31. I just came across this by way of illustation that at the upper limits are capable of better 'ambient beating' than the levels nearer the X-sync with long burn flashes.
    On the left, 400ws Quantum, on the right 400ws Lumedyne
    [​IMG]
     
  32. Ian, thank you again for posting those additional examples. Running my own tests should make all of this much clearer, since I only just received my Speedotron Force 10 yesterday. At first glance, I seem to be "wasting" about a stop of output at 1/8,000th. This is just a guess. I'll have to perform more tests with a flashmeter to see what's actually going on. Here's the results of some quick tests yesterday afternoon (note that while the background is black in the last two frames, there was still quite a bit of late-afternoon ambient daylight present):
    Nikon D3s + MiniTT1 + FlexTT5 + Speedotron Force 10:
    [​IMG]
    1/3,200th @ f/2.0
    [​IMG]
    1/8,000th @ f/1.6
    [​IMG]
    1/3,200th @ f/1.6
    [note: an SB-800 was also fired in the last two frames as a hairlight, unfiltered; the Force 10 was gelled with full-CTO.]
     
  33. Although I forgot to take a shot of the entire set-up, I did shoot the modifier itself: The Speedotron Force 10, with a standard reflector at full-flood, was placed a few feet behind a Photoflex 39" x 39" Litepanel, with a "translucent" (i.e., "silk") panel attached. A Vagabond Mini Lithium was used to power the the Force 10 (set at slow-recycle), and power was set at both 1/2- and full-power for various shots. Recycle time was about 3 seconds at half-power; 8 seconds at full-power:
    [​IMG]
     
  34. The slower flash duration will provide you with greater flexibility and choice of aperture when you get around to using it properly. It will be interesting to find out whether the output to 1/8000s is consistant with the 1/250s output and whether you gain or lose anything, but either way it's a useful feature to know you have.
    The Force 10 appears to work quite well.
     
  35. Sheldon said:
    The whole long tail strobe/hypersync/shutter speed well beyond the sync speed . . . doesn't help you overpower ambient, it just allows you to shoot with more open apertures without having to use an ND filter.​
    Okay, after doing my own, brief, and totally unscientific tests yesterday, I re-read your post, and I think I finally get it! I am losing flash power, and while Hypersync alone may not let me "overpower the sun," at least I can try to clobber it with a high-Watt second strobe, really close to my subject! Thank you again, for that informative discourse!
     
  36. Ian said:
    It will be interesting to find out whether the output to 1/8000s is consistant with the 1/250s output and whether you gain or lose anything, but either way it's a useful feature to know you have.​
    Yes, I can't wait to do some more precise measurements, and see how much I'm actually losing/gaining. Thanks again for all your comments and posted illustrations!
    Ian also said:
    The Force 10 appears to work quite well.​
    Yeah, I love this thing! It's solidly built and has an ingeniously simple and effective way of adjusting its focus, with its big red focus collar/reflector ring design. Plus, these things just look cool (although, it is huge)! At a flash duration of 1/850th, unfortunately for Hypersync, it's not the longest, but at least it's constant throughout its power range. I plan to buy a Dynalite Uni400JR as well, for its longer, 1/675th flash duration.
     
  37. My thanks to all who contributed to this thread: Pete, Ellis, Marc, Sheldon, and Ian. Thank you all, for helping to clarify what I presume is an often-misunderstood topic (FP/HSS, Hypersync, 't' measurements, and ambient exposure control). It's a tricky technique, with a ton of variables, and a few important caveats. Your assistance is much appreciated, and has really helped to shallow my learning curve here. Thanks, guys!
     
  38. Yeah, I love this thing! It's solidly built and has an ingeniously simple and effective way of adjusting its focus, with its big red focus collar/reflector ring design. Plus, these things just look cool (although, it is huge)! At a flash duration of 1/850th, unfortunately for Hypersync, it's not the longest, but at least it's constant throughout its power range. I plan to buy a Dynalite Uni400JR as well, for its longer, 1/675th flash duration.​
    Consistent flash duration throughout the power range will be a useful addition.
     
  39. Using non-ControlTL supported monolights with a MiniTT1/FlexTT5 set-up:
    Apparently, my Nikon Speedlights do have enough "oomph" to act as accent or hair lights, even in combination with my 1,000 Watt-second, Speedotron Force 10 monolight (when used through a modifier). Using the FlexTT5 with the Force 10 does two things: 1.) Enables bullet-proof RF triggering. 2.) Enables Hypersync control over the monolight.
    [Note: to use a FlexTT5 with a Force 10, you simply connect a mono mini male cable into the FlexTT5's flash sync port, with the other end of the cable being a male 1/4" mono phone, which plugs into the Force 10's sync jack. If Speedotron made an accessory mount which could mate to its top mounting groove (another cool feature, by the way), I could rig a $10 flash bracket to accomodate a neat place to mount the TT5 (currently, it's simply dangling by its sync cable).]
    My FlexTT5 doesn't perform any remote control features over the Force 10's power output. But, I found that isn't as great a handicap as I thought it would be. Since the Force 10 (or, Dynalite Uni400JR) will generally only be used as the primary key for daylight exteriors, it's also typically going to be going through a large modifier anyway (cutting it down even more). So, I'll likely be using the Force 10 at full- or half-power 99% of the time. The Dynalite, I'll likely use at 100% power, 100% of the time.
    So, just as I do when lighting for television using continous sources, I'll be controlling my flash exposure mainly by adjusting flash-to-subject distance, and by the type of modifier used. However, the beauty of the MiniTT1/FlexTT5 set-up, with a Nikon SU-800 or PocketWizard AC3, is that you may easily combine unsupported strobes (set, in my case, typically at full-power), with i-TTL controlled Speedlights.
     
  40. In cases beyond maximum x-sync, lower output values are barely an issue. Useful to have, but mainly of little use. (Unless recycle time become important, I suppose).
     
  41. Apparently, my Nikon Speedlights do have enough "oomph" to act as accent or hair lights, even in combination with my 1,000 Watt-second, Speedotron Force 10 monolight​
    You will get more from them using them at full power without using FP mode. I don't know how you might manage that with the PW's though, unless you use them out of the hotshoe via a sync cable?
     
  42. Ian said:
    You will get more from them using them at full power without using FP mode. I don't know how you might manage that with the PW's though, unless you use them out of the hotshoe via a sync cable?​
    Maybe by taping the TTL contacts on the hot shoe?
     
  43. Nikon D3s + SU-800 + MiniTT1 + Flex TT5 (2) + Speedotron Force 10 @ 1/2 power w/full-CTO + SB-600 @ -0.7 EV:
    [​IMG]
    AF-S Nikkor 85mm f/1.4G; ISO 200; 1/3,200th @ f/1.6.
     
  44. Ian:
    I'm still struggling through some of your posts, trying to piece together some quantitative conclusions from them. In previous posts, you mentioned an Elinchrom Ranger. I assume you meant an 1,100 Watt-second Ranger RX pack and a Freelight 'A' or 'S' head. So, in your second series of photo examples (model on grass), I assume it's an 1,100 Watt-second head through a large softbox, several feet from the model. According to a B+H description, the Ranger RX pack's longest flash duration is only 1/2,300th.
    In your third series of photo examples (interior), you're using, I assume, a Quantum Qflash 400Ws strobe, and a similar Lumadyne model. However, I wasn't able to find published data on either strobe's flash duration.
    My question is, you seemed to be able to successfully attain high-shutter speed sync (apparently using Quantum triggers) without any obvious apparent loss of power, or shutter curtain issues. Is this correct? Could you elaborate a bit more on some of the conclusions from those two series? Thanks!
     
  45. Maybe by taping the TTL contacts on the hot shoe?​
    I don't know.. The PW ControlTL system won't trigger a pin and rail flash at all unless you use a hotshoe adapter to a plug, or just a sync cable. I can't see that taping up the TTL contacts would work as this would reduce the TTL flash to the same pin and rail flash which I tried and doesn't work.
     
  46. It was TomBol not I who was using a Ranger with an 'S' head, I think you asked me to comment on that after you posted his link ?
    The results with the Elinchrom indicate that the same HSS hack is available which is already possible and just maintaining ratio. I continually tell people that they need to try out their kit to see what it does as (apparently) this doesn't work with fast duration flashes - yet it works fine with Speedlights up to around 1/800 - 1/1000s as I recall even with cheap radios, and without the associated FP/HSS output penalty. Different cameras do provide different results.
    I use Quantum and Lumedyne with which (as you previously mentioned with your PW's) work in TTL and trigger other manual flash too at the same time. I can use this in a variety of ways; A Trio on camera with built-in radio with FP mode using regular HSS and syncing Manual remote Quantums and Lumedynes, a radio transmitter and a 'D' adapter on camera giving regular sync TTL FEC and then combined with this hack (illustrated with the softbox / girl on grass), and just radio alone (with an FP mode flash in hotshoe) for the hack again, using just the standard receivers.
    Having the 'D' adapter on camera which has TTL pins, sets the camera to FP mode for shutterspeeds above x-sync, after that, setting the remotes Manually 1/1 enables their sync to 1/8000s. Just as the girl on the grass was shot.
    The Quantums can be configured for 200ws and 400ws, and the Lumedynes 200/400/600/800ws. This by adding booster modules, which all work beyond x-sync. (The Lumedynes go higher with a Quartz head to 2400ws and a multi-head to 3200ws, but I don't go to those extremes as I have power packs if I ever had need for that. I have a 6K pack that syncs this way).
    Since the greatest level of output of any flash, long or short duration, is it's peak output - it stands to reason that in all cases the Peak output is always present, this combined with a long (or short) tale. Where a shutterspeed of 1/250s takes nearer to 1/150s to complete from initial openning to final closure and an 1/8000s shutterspeed takes nearer the 1/250s duration (very slightly longer). This duration (1/250s duration for a 18000s shutterspeed) being closer and benefiting proportionately greater from the peak output (at the beginning of the exposure) AND in use is being combined with wider apertures.. this is where the top end 1/8000s advantage comes from.
    The Quantums and Lumedynes have flash durations of around 1/350s at full output. Metz flash units have durations of around 1/250s. Their performance has always been good for this purpose, but I've never really explored them in detail.
     
  47. Well, "beating the ambient," isn't easy! Here, I've got a 1,000 Watt-second strobe at full-power, bounced into a 60" silver umbrella only about six feet from the subject. A Nikon SB-600 (no modifier) was dialed-in via TTL using an SU-800/MiniTT1/FlexTT5, placed at about six feet to the left of camera for a backlight:
    [​IMG]
    Nikon D3s; AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G; ISO 100; 1/8,000 @ f1.4
    Taken today, the day of the summer solstice, it's only about 5:30 PM PST at the time this was shot, so it was in full daylight (although, there was also a fair amount of cloud cover). I'm going to wait until twilight and try to shoot more tests. I have not yet used the PocketWizard applet to "optimize" the curtain timing of the D3s. Will attempt that now.
     
  48. Ian said:
    I continually tell people that they need to try out their kit to see what it does . . .​
    Thanks again for providing all that information. Yes, I'm eagerly "trying out my kit to see what it does." Although, I'm still not precisely sure what I'm getting, how I'm getting it, and how much I'm losing.
    . . . as (apparently) this doesn't work with fast duration flashes - yet it works fine with Speedlights up to around 1/800 - 1/1000s as I recall even with cheap radios, and without the associated FP/HSS output penalty.​
    Interesting. So, do you think perhaps, the 1/850th flash duration of my Speedotron Force 10 is still "under the wire?" As I said, I'm planning to get some Dynalight Uni400JRs to hopefully waste somewhat less flash power by exploiting its slightly longer, 1/675th-of-a-second, full-power flash duration (and again, I'll only likely ever use the Dynalite at nothing but full-power, since its flash duration decreases significantly over its decreased power range).
     
  49. Okay, I finally RTFM! I then ran the PocketWizard utility on the MiniTT1, and reset a couple of the firmware settings:
    1. I had to check the box under the "sync" tab to engage, "High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) Disable Mode," on the MiniTT1. The default condition is unchecked. The FlexTT5s do not need to be programmed to use HyperSync.
    2. I set the HyperSync offset value to its minimum value below zero, -2300.
    I now realize that previously, I was unknowingly using PocketWizards' version of FP/HSS, not HyperSync. I just shot some full-frame tests of a white silk, with various offset values applied to the MiniTT1, and found that I got the highest bar-free sync shutter speed on my D3s at about 1/2,000th by setting the offset value in the PocketWizard utility to -2300. There's probably a critical difference between the Force 10's 1/850th flash duration, and the Dynalite Uni's 1/675th, since the previously mentioned photographer [http://www.lebryk.com/category/pocket-wizard/] was able to achieve bar-free images approaching 1/8,000th, using his D3s and a Dynalite Uni400JR. At 1/8,000th, I believe the photographer stated that he incurred about a 7% lower-frame portion of black bar, which he simply cropped out to gain the higher sync speed.
     
  50. Interesting. So, do you think perhaps, the 1/850th flash duration of my Speedotron Force 10 is still "under the wire?"​
    Tecchnically speaking, no. From a practical aspect, it's possible. You've proved that it works already.
    I'm still not precisely sure what I'm getting, how I'm getting it, and how much I'm losing.​
    You can find out by comparing with your equipment against results obtained at 1/250s and seeing what changes occur as you change the offset value. In order to see the graduation and tail effect you need to shoot a plain sample.
     
  51. Ian said:
    The Quantums and Lumedynes have flash durations of around 1/350s at full output. Metz flash units have durations of around 1/250s. Their performance has always been good for this purpose, but I've never really explored them in detail.​
    Good to know! Wow! I just checked--the Quantums and Metz units sure are pricey! I'll probably try to find some Dynalites instead, and run them from Vagabond Minis.
     
  52. Ian said:
    Since the greatest level of output of any flash, long or short duration, is it's peak output - it stands to reason that in all cases the Peak output is always present, this combined with a long (or short) tale. Where a shutterspeed of 1/250s takes nearer to 1/150s to complete from initial openning to final closure and an 1/8000s shutterspeed takes nearer the 1/250s duration (very slightly longer). This duration (1/250s duration for a 18000s shutterspeed) being closer and benefiting proportionately greater from the peak output (at the beginning of the exposure) AND in use is being combined with wider apertures.. this is where the top end 1/8000s advantage comes from.​
    Thanks for your reply! If you saw my previous post, where I subsequently disabled the PocketWizards implementation of FP/HSS in the MiniTT1 utility software, I'm now testing in pure HyperSync, without any FP/HSS in-range. I'm very interested in more clearly understanding your statement, "Where a shutterspeed of 1/250s takes nearer to 1/150s to complete from initial openning to final closure and an 1/8000s shutterspeed takes nearer the 1/250s duration (very slightly longer) . . . " I would appreciate it if you wouldn't mind re-stating that somehow.
    Also, if I manage to accomplish, " . . . benefiting proportionately greater from the peak output (at the beginning of the exposure) AND in use is being combined with wider apertures . . . " as you mentioned, by using a longer-duration flash unit, that would seem to be the optimal goal. Thanks!
     
  53. I'm very interested in more clearly understanding your statement, "Where a shutterspeed of 1/250s takes nearer to 1/150s to complete from initial openning to final closure and an 1/8000s shutterspeed takes nearer the 1/250s duration (very slightly longer) . . . " I would appreciate it if you wouldn't mind re-stating that somehow.​
    At x-sync, the sensor is fully exposed, and there is no shutter curtain in the way.
    To do this, obviously the first curtain needs to open. As it is doing this, the sensor is being exposed unevenly.. the first point starts exposing until finally the very last part of the sensor starts it's exposure. (in this, there is a time delay imposed by the speed of the shutter curtain). Immediately, there's the flash, then the second curtain starts to close following the first curtain at the same speed, until the sensor is no longer exposed.
    The time this takes needs to allow a gap between the first shutter and second shutter of at least the x-sync speed, because -- as manufacturers push the x-sync to the limit, this is the maximum they can go before getting curtain shadows -- so essentially you have an exposure time duration of 1. the first curtain crossing the sensor and fully exposing it 2. the x-sync point with the sensor fully exposed 3. the second curtain crossing the sensor and completing the exposure. The second curtain is 1/250s behind the first curtain, in order for there to be a 1/250s shutter time, so because we know that the x-sync is optimised for 1/250s we know that the first curtain travels the sensor in 1/250s and the second shutter travels the sensor in 1/250s, thus ensuring that all parts of the sensor equally receive 1/250s exposure. The time duration of this is 1/250s + 1/250s = 1/125s. Now, THATS for 1/250s.. if we increase our shutterspeed to 1/320s the sensor is not ever fully exposed because it is travelling closer to the first curtain so consequently the duration is less.. something less than 1/125s (say 1/150s). As the shutterspeed increases to the maximum so too does this duration reduce, but only to the point approaching the time it takes for the first curtain to get across the sensor. That time is 1/250s.
    So for a 1/250s exposure time the duration of the exposure is 1/125s
    For a 1/320s exposure time the duration of the exposure is 1/150s
    For a 1/8000s exposure time the duration of the exposure is approaching the maximum x-sync point.. i.e. the fastest time the curtain can get across the sensor @ 1/250s.
    It would be good if the light source output could be constantly high for these durations which is how HSS or FP mode works, but using regular flash pulses there's a peak in output then a tailing off which depending on your flash model provides different results.
    Because the shortest shutterspeed (1/8000s) uses 1/250s duration to complete it's cycle and it's possible to btain flash units with this same or similar duration, then thats where the maximum benefit will be found.
    The caveat as always is that the whole system you use imposes advantages and disadvantages. The speed of the camera shutter curtains, the sync point the camera uses, the format of the camera, the speed of the radio trigger, the time for the flash to process the command to trigger, the time for the tube to reach full output and it's intensity for maximum benefit and the length of the decay (tail) of the flash.
    There's more here: http://www.commercialphotographer.co.uk/blog/?p=274 if your head isn't battered enough yet :)
     
  54. Ian:
    Thanks again for taking the time to write that extremely detailed post! I'll have to re-read it a couple more times . . . s-l-o-w-l-y. Once I "get it," I'll move on to your blog. Again, I'll have to perform more tests on my own to gain a better understanding of all of this first-hand. Thanks again!
     
  55. Nikon D3s/Speedotron Force 10 HyperSync Shutter Curtain Tests:
    HyperSync offset value = -2300; FP/HSS disabled in PocketWizard utility.
    [Note: Force 10 has a constant flash duration of 1/850th over its entire power range.]
    [​IMG]
    1/2,000th
    [​IMG]
    1/3,200th
    [​IMG]
    1/8,000th
     
  56. I just bought a used Dynalite Uni400JR online. I'll post comparison shutter-curtain test sample images here as soon as I receive it from USPS (which I'm guessing, could take a week).
     
  57. Long flash-duration strobes [revised 07.04.11]:
    1. Quantum Qflash (various models)
    Full power = 1/300th-1/400th
    2. Lumedyne (various models)
    Full power = 1/400th w/400Ws Signature-series power supply
    Full power = 1/800th w/200Ws Signature-series power supply
    3. Dynalite Uni400JR $598 USD
    Full power = 1/675th
    1/2 power = 1/1,100th
    1/4 power =1/1,800th
    1/8 power = 1/2,200th
    4. Speedotron Force 10 $794 USD
    Full power = 1/850th [note: constant 't' value over entire power range, according to manufacturer.]
    5. Bowens Gemini 500R $579 USD
    Full power = 1/900th
     
  58. For the above listed strobes, I will soon be able to test HyperSync maximum sync speeds using a Nikon D3s body + TT1/TT5, and the following strobes:
    Quantum Qflash model T (1/300th-1/400th, full-power): pending; awaiting delivery.
    Dynalite Uni400JR (1/675th, full-power): pending; awaiting delivery.
    Speedotron Force 10 (1/850th, constant): limited testing; successful up to about 1/1,000th, using a -2,300 offset value in the PocketWizard TT1 utility.
     
  59. Ralph oshiro wrote:
    Speedotron Force 10 (1/850th, constant): limited testing; successful up to about 1/1,000th, using a -2,300 offset value in the PocketWizard TT1 utility.​
    Have you set this properly or just pushed it to it's maximum? The way to do it is to set up against a white wall with your flash at full power and try multiple settings until you get the one which is best, giving the maximum Hypersync benefit.. or at least the brightest bar in the centre of the frame. It's quite time consuming with having to access and adjust the offset through the PW utility and then running the tests again. Using an SB800 or SB900 for this is pretty common. This offset obtained with these seemes to work pretty well with other lights I tested too. Obviously the flash you're using will have an influence so you can tune for that later. HOWEVER.. if you're out on location shooting then your offset needs to suit what you're shooting with.. both for the camera and for the lighting.
    If you're going to try different lighting, you might as well start out with a decent yardstick at the camera to measure with.
    Other D3s users have reported a good offset value of -1400 for the D3s, so your -2300 just seems quite a way off.

    Here's a list of offsets I used and others used as a guide:
    D3x.................. Offset -1850 + 1.6 stops benefit @ 1/800s
    D2x.................. Offset -1550 + 1.6 stops benefit @ 1/800s
    D7000............. Offset -1850 + 1.6 stops benefit @ 1/800s
    Nikon D300s.... Offset -1500 + 1.6 stops benefit @ 1/800s
    Nikon D3.......... Offset -1400
     
  60. Long flash-duration strobes [revised 07.05.11]:
    All flash durations are given in t.5 values unless otherwise noted. Note that t.5 values are typically 1/3 the speed of t.1 values. In other words, actual t.1 values are approximately three times longer in duration than the manufacturer's stated t.5 values. Both Dynalite and Speedotron data are sourced from manufacturer spec sheets. Data for other products listed below have not been confirmed by their respective manufacturers.
    1. Quantum Qflash (various models)
    Full power = 1/300th-1/400th
    2. Metz (various models)
    Full power = 1/375th, estimate [t.1 = 1/125th]
    3. Lumedyne (various models)
    Full power = 1/400th w/400Ws Signature-series power supply
    Full power = 1/800th w/200Ws Signature-series power supply
    4. Dynalite Uni400JR $598 USD
    Full power = 1/675th
    1/2 power = 1/1,100th
    1/4 power =1/1,800th
    1/8 power = 1/2,200th
    5. Speedotron Force 10 $794 USD
    Full power = 1/850th [note: constant over entire power range, according to manufacturer.]
    6. Bowens Gemini 500R $579 USD
    Full power = 1/900th
     
  61. Ian said:
    Have you set this properly or just pushed it to it's maximum?​
    Apparently, no! And, yes, I did just set the offset to its minimum value to see if it had a "maximum" effect. I did the tests very quickly, with very little thinking or analysis involved. I tried about four offset values, and the black bar kept getting lower. I have not taken the time since to perform more studied tests. Thank you for publishing those starting points for Nikon bodies (I'm sure many others will appreciate the information as well!).
    As soon as I receive my "slow-burn" Quantum Qflash and Dynalite 400 units, I'll try to perform more accurate tests. Thanks again!
     
  62. I'll be particularly interested in your Hypersync results, especially the possibility of increasing the relative output of the flash against ambient at higher than x-sync.. much like the example provided using the SB900 and mini/flex previously.
    To obtain an increase like this will have to be a compromise when incorporating the shorter peak flash duration into a longer shutter duration, I just wonder whether by setting your offset to -2300 you will have missed the maximum output peak and might just be working with the flash decay?
    Anyhow, good luck, I look forward to seeing your results.
     
  63. I've finally received all of my top-three, long-duration monolight contenders (plus, my long-awaited Chimera quick-release speedring for my Force 10!). Unfortunately, due to other obligations, I simply haven't been able to start any kind of thorough testing yet, but a very brief FP/HSS test with my newly acquired Quantum Qflash was rather impressive: full 1/8,000th sync with no issues, with a reasonable full-power recycle time from its Quantum Turbo battery. Can't wait to quantify how much flash power is "wasted" in this mode, since the results look very good. An interesting side note: the Qflash apparently displays its flash duration on its rear LCD display: "1/300th," at full power. Encouraging.
    Here are my "top-three" contenders:
    1. Quantum Qflash Model T
    Full power = 1/300th
    2. Dynalite Uni400JR
    Full power = 1/675th
    3. Speedotron Force 10
    Full power = 1/850th [constant]
     
  64. An interesting side note: the Qflash apparently displays its flash duration on its rear LCD display: "1/300th," at full power.​
    I've never seen that before, but I've never used a 'T' before either. The X2-4-5's or T4-5's don't show that, but it would be useful.
    Here's a chart I found you might find of interest:
    [​IMG]
     
  65. Ian said:
    Here's a chart I found you might find of interest . . .​
    Yes. Very interesting. Thanks! I just checked--holy cow! Those Qflash X2/Qpaq-X battery and power supplies are uber-expensive! Going to go play with my discount-priced, Ebay-gotten Qflash model T and Dynalite 400 right now (finally!) . . .
     
  66. Current PocketWizard Utility Settings for my Nikon D3s:
    [​IMG]
     
  67. Quantum Qflash Model T: (used with above PocketWizard utility settings)
    Offset = -1,400
    1. FP/HSS hack
    : TT1 transmitting RF to --> TT5/SB-600 transmitting optically to --> Wein optical slave, hard-connected to Quantum QF12 Nikon TTL (non-iTTL) cable into Qflash accessory input.
    Results: = Fail; severe loss of flash power--several stops of "underexposure."
    2. PocketWizard HyperSync: TT1 transmitting RF to --> TT5, hard-connected to Quantum QF12 TTL cable, plugged into Qflash accessory input.
    Results: All shutter speeds above 1/250th appear to lose about a stop of flash output, but the loss is constant and doesn't appear to decrease with higher shutter speeds; i.e., the difference in exposure at f/11 @ 1/500th looks no different than the equivalent exposure at f/2.8 @ 1/8,000th.
     
  68. Quantum Qflash Model T:
    Offset = -2,300
    PocketWizard HyperSync: TT1 transmitting RF to --> TT5, hard-connected to Quantum QF12 TTL cable, plugged into Qflash accessory input.
    Results: At f/2.8 @ 1/8,000th, exposure at this offset value appears similar as described above, but at f/11 @ 1/500th, exposure appears "darker," unlke when using the above, previous offset value of -1,400
     
  69. Now, I've changed the settings as shown below, selecting the checkbox to disable HSS/FP, and setting the offset to its minimum value of -2,300 (the offset value was set to its minimum value of -2,300, since at a value -1,400, the black bar was nearly center-frame (black on the bottom-half of the frame).
    [​IMG]
    Test images results appear to indicate an actual gain of a stop or more of recorded flash output, over the exposure accomplished at the default X-sync speed of 1/250th, using these settings. The black bar at the bottom of the frame becomes visible at shutter speeds approaching 1/2,000th, and is clearly visible in the lower part of the frame at 1/8,000th. Practically speaking, these settings are reasonable up to about 1/2,000th (or, 1/8,000th, if cropped), with an actual increase in flash exposure over X-sync exposure, at these settings.
     
  70. Quantum Qflash Model T:
    Offset = -2,300
    HSS/FP = disabled
    PocketWizard HyperSync: TT1 transmitting RF to --> TT5, hard-connected to Quantum QF12 TTL cable, plugged into Qflash accessory input.
    [​IMG]
    X-sync: f/16 @ 1/250th
    [​IMG]
    f8 @ 1/1,000th
    [​IMG]
    f/5.6 @ 1/2,000th
    [​IMG]
    f/4.0 @ 1/4,000th
    [​IMG]
    f/2.8 @ 1/8,000th
     
  71. [Referring to the test images I posted on the previous page . . .]
    Okay, now that I'm looking at the full-screen images (not just the tiny images on my 3" LCD), I see that the illumination isn't even on the high-speed shots, and I'm not getting the "stop or more" gain I claimed earlier in recorded flash output (refer to the gray card placed in the shot--it's actually darker in the high-speed shots). So, the same, top-of-frame-is-dark issue exists. The shutter's "slit" (or, t.1 "peak") is apparently the "hot" band in the lower part of the frame. Also, the reflectance of the material I used isn't even (it's the back of a Photoflex reflector). Flawed as they are, here, at least, is some data. I'll try to create a more appropriate test set-up next time. Comments, critiques, corrections are most welcome!
     
  72. Questions and Observations:
    1. For all tests, my Nikon D3s' "flash sync speed" menu is set to "1/250s (Auto FP)." This is the only way I can get the camera to release the shutter at speeds higher than 1/250th with a TTL device (i.e., the MiniTT1) mounted in its hot-shoe.
    2. I just tried my Dynalite Uni400JR with similar results to the Qflash's. Here's what I see: in the two modes below (ignore the offset values for the moment), when "High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) Disable Mode" is not selected (below) in the PocketWizard utility, a drop in exposure occurs with about a one-stop loss in recorded flash output. While all exposures occurring at above 1/250th are slightly darker, there is no black bar, there is no uneven "slitted" exposure hotspot, and no darkening of the upper frame. Also, as shutter speed is increased, no overall drop in recorded flash exposure is visible (beyond the initial one-stop loss), even at 1/8,000th. What "mode" is this called? Would it be appropriate to refer to this as "PocketWizard HSS/FP?" This, to be able to differentiate it from "Nikon FP sync for Speedlights?" I gather that it's using the FP trigger sync point, yet of course, it's not pulsing non-Speedlight strobes. Why and how is this different?
    [​IMG]
    3. When "High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) Disable Mode" is selected (below), exposures occurring at above 1/250th, are slightly brighter, but a black bar appears at the bottom of the frame at about 1/2,000th, and uneven "slitted" exposure hotspots are seen, and darkening of the upper frame is visible. What is this mode called? Is this the only mode which would accurately referred to as, "HyperSync?"
    [​IMG]
     
  73. Preliminary Conclusions:
    1. Employing "PocketWizard HSS/FP" with long-duration strobes enables bar-free, evenly illuminated frames at all shutter speeds above X-sync, up to and including 1/8,000th on a Nikon D3s body. This appears to come at a consistent, approximate, one-stop loss in recorded flash output--i.e., loss of recorded flash output did not increase (after the initial one-stop loss) as shutter speed increased, even at 1/8,000th).
    2. Employing "PocketWizard HyperSync" with long-duration strobes enables bar-free, mostly evenly illuminated frames at all shutter speeds above X-sync, up to about 1/1,000th on a Nikon D3s body. Also, while the upper-frame continues to become slightly less-exposed as shutter speed increases, the latter part of the frame receives slightly more recorded flash exposure at all shutter speeds above X-sync, up to about 1/1,000th.
     
  74. 1. Employing "PocketWizard HSS/FP" with long-duration strobes enables bar-free, evenly illuminated frames at all shutter speeds above X-sync, up to and including 1/8,000th on a Nikon D3s body. This appears to come at a consistent, approximate, one-stop loss in recorded flash output--i.e., loss of recorded flash output did not increase (after the initial one-stop loss) as shutter speed increased, even at 1/8,000th).​
    Was your one stop loss the equivalent of going from 1/250s @f16 to 1/500s @f8, or are you meaning that you had to go from 1/250s @f16 to 1/500s @f11 ?
    2. Employing "PocketWizard HyperSync" with long-duration strobes enables bar-free, mostly evenly illuminated frames at all shutter speeds above X-sync, up to about 1/1,000th on a Nikon D3s body. Also, while the upper-frame continues to become slightly less-exposed as shutter speed increases, the latter part of the frame receives slightly more recorded flash exposure at all shutter speeds above X-sync, up to about 1/1,000th.​
    Hypersync tends to do that. In your shutter range 1/250s - 1/1000s, if you find a shutter speed that you're happy with despite the graduation, then that's sweet.
    Ideally.. the PW 'High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) begins at' option would (if you were happy with the 1/1,000s shutterspeed) allow 'High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) begins at' 1/1250s option - allowing you to use Hypersync with any flash advantage you get, and then switch to FP mode to retain full frame coverage seemlessly. Currently this is limited to 1/500s unless you overide FP/HSS entirely, but that then leads to black bars at higher settings.
    You can set C1 and C2 to 'High Speed Sync disabled' / or not, as different options.
     
  75. Ian asked:
    Was your one stop loss the equivalent of going from 1/250s @f16 to 1/500s @f8, or are you meaning that you had to go from 1/250s @f16 to 1/500s @f11 ?​
    Yes, to the former: 1/250th @ f/16 to (the equivalent of) 1/500th @ f8. My exposure was at 1/500th @ f/11 but appeared about a stop darker than at X-sync. I'll perform more exact tests as soon as I get a free afternoon this week.
    Ian also said:
    Ideally.. the PW 'High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) begins at' option would (if you were happy with the 1/1,000s shutterspeed) allow 'High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) begins at' 1/1250s option - allowing you to use Hypersync with any flash advantage you get, and then switch to FP mode to retain full frame coverage seemlessly. Currently this is limited to 1/500s unless you overide FP/HSS entirely, but that then leads to black bars at higher settings.​
    Aha! Yes! I'm finally getting all this. At first, the PocketWizard utility's options confused the crap outta me. Now, I realize how the "High Speed Sync HSS/FP Begins at:" value can be used. I think my version of the utility, unfortunately, tops out at 1/640th.
    Ian continued:
    You can set C1 and C2 to 'High Speed Sync disabled' / or not, as different options.​
    Great idea! Going back and forth to a computer to change this setting certainly is less than convenient. Now, both the utility's options and the C1/C2 memories really make sense. This is probably how I'll set-up my C1/C2 settings:
    C1 = "PocketWizard HSS/FP" ["High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) Disable Mode" = not selected]
    C2 = "PocketWizard HyperSync" ["High Speed Sync (HSS/FP) Disable Mode" = selected (HSS/FP disabled)]
     
  76. Now, I realize how the "High Speed Sync HSS/FP Begins at:" value can be used. I think my version of the utility, unfortunately, tops out at 1/640th.​
    EXCEPT; By setting 1/640s you only get to use 1/500s in Hypersync. Your 1/640s is the "High Speed Sync HSS/FP Begins at" setting... i.e HSS/FP begins at 1/640s.
    From specifications you've mentioned, you might have older firmware loaded. You mentioned using -2300 as an offset, yet PW only mention -2000 as an option now so I don't know how that might help or hinder what you're trying to do and whether the 'old' -2300 is the same as the 'new' -2000 if that has changed. It's worth bearing in mind that newer firmware will be repairing older problems so you might want to update that..
    Losing 1 stop of output is disappointing, so if you're being challenged by bright light and your flashes are maxed out there may still be a place for the ND's.
     
  77. Ian said:
    By setting 1/640s you only get to use 1/500s in Hypersync. Your 1/640s is the "High Speed Sync HSS/FP Begins at" setting... i.e HSS/FP begins at 1/640s.​
    Gotcha.
    From specifications you've mentioned, you might have older firmware loaded.​
    Since you're Canon, I believe, and I'm Nikon, we may have different "current" versions of the application software (I think mine is v2.3). I do click the "update" button from time to time, and all that comes up is an updated HTML help file.
    Losing 1 stop of output is disappointing, so if you're being challenged by bright light and your flashes are maxed out there may still be a place for the ND's.​
    Yes, that seems to be the case. I guess I'll finally have to pony up for one of those pricey variable ND filters. But, I'm absolutely elated that I don't seem to be losing more than that single stop in HSS/FP mode, even as I increase shutter speed all the way up to 1/8,000th (compared with my apparent one-stop loss per every increase in shutter speed with my Speedotron Force 10). I'm dying to perform more accurate tests to confirm all of this (and to post some better test images here). Unfortunately, I have a very early call tomorrow.
    P.S. For others following this thread, remember that all of this information is both camera body-specific, and flash-specific. Your mileage will definitely vary.
     
  78. I'm out of the loop as to the most recent firmware for Nikon, (which I use). But on the Nikon spec of the PW site yesterday I read that the offsets were now between +200 to -2000 settings. (Maybe I did read about the Canon version).
    Are you certain that you can't keep ratio using the PW's? Losing a stop shouldn't be the case. Maybe at the 1/320s - 1/1000s levels that sort of loss might be evident, but at the faster shutter speeds that loss shouldn't still be one stop ?
     
  79. I said:
    Since you're Canon, I believe, and I'm Nikon, we may have different "current" versions of the application software (I think mine is v2.3).​
    Correction: my application version is v2.2
     
  80. Ian said:
    Are you certain that you can't keep ratio using the PW's? Losing a stop shouldn't be the case. Maybe at the 1/320s - 1/1000s levels that sort of loss might be evident, but at the faster shutter speeds that loss shouldn't still be one stop?​
    In HSS/FP mode, it appears that I'm losing one-stop, total (not incrementally), throughout the entire shutter speed range with the Qflash and Dynalite over X-sync (but not with the Speedotron; I lose one stop, incrementally, per increase in shutter speed). This is why I'm trying to hard-wire sync directly from camera to get some baseline data without any PocketWizards in the equation. I'm a bit suspect myself. Let me re-test, confirm, and get back to you.
     
  81. Body: Nikon D3s
    Strobe: Dynalite Uni400JR, full-power; t.5 = 1/675th
    HSS/FP = enabled; HSS/FP begins at = 1/500th; HyperSync offset = -1,400
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  82. Body: Nikon D3s
    Strobe: Dynalite Uni400JR, full-power; t.5 = 1/675th
    HSS/FP = disabled; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  83. Body: Nikon D3s
    Strobe: Quantum Qflash model T @ full-power; t 0.5 = 1/300th
    HSS/FP = enabled; HSS/FP begins at = 1/500th; HyperSync offset = -1,400
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  84. Body: Nikon D3s
    Strobe: Quantum Qflash model T @ full-power; t 0.5 = 1/300th
    HSS/FP = DISABLED; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  85. If you don't mind me saying Ralph, your results are not as good as I would have expected from those slow units. In fact, Im pretty certain that I can get better results from a speedlight without any graduation between 1/1000s - 1/8000s, even with the faster duration. (1/320s, 1/400s and 1/500s always seem to be a bit on the dark side IMO, but still don't get graduations).
    I have no experience with the Dynalites, but I do get better results with the Quantum T's.. the T5's in my case, but I doubt that there will be very much difference between the two models of T to cause so much noticeable difference as in your tests. Even camera wise, you're using a D3s, and my results are from a D3x. I would expect that they share the same shutter, so that shouldn't impose much of a difference, if any.
    If you get a chance - try this:
    Put a speedlight in your hotshoe, connect your Quantum or Dynalite by sync cable to your D3s (use either the body sync or secondary flash PC sync) and see what you get. I would expect you to get a less vignetted result yet perhaps a little darker than could be obtained by radio. Your on camera flash should be set to low power and pointed away from your subject area. All this is doing is providing the sync point for your Quantum or Dynalite flash to use, so it's output is irrelevant.
    If you manage to get a more even coverage with less vignette, then there's something wrong somewhere. If there is the same type of vignette then thats the characteristics of your setup, and you've achieved the best you can.
     
  86. Ian said:
    If you don't mind me saying Ralph, your results are not as good as I would have expected from those slow units. In fact, Im pretty certain that I can get better results from a speedlight without any graduation between 1/1000s - 1/8000s, even with the faster duration.​
    I don't mind at all, Ian. Thanks for taking the time to help vet these tests. Yes, I was rather unimpressed the results as well. In contrast, your previously posted results demonstrate significantly improved benefits over mine--impressive, even. I hardwire-synced the first shots as a baseline to take the PocketWizards completely out of the equation. I still may have an issue with the way I'm syncing the Qflash--need take the QF-12 TTL cable out of the loop, and if you've read my other "sync" thread, you can see that I'm experiencing some rather puzzling sync issues.
    If you get a chance - try this: Put a speedlight in your hotshoe, connect your Quantum or Dynalite by sync cable to your D3s (use either the body sync or secondary flash PC sync) and see what you get.​
    Absolutely! As soon as I can get to it; though, probably not until later this evening.
     
  87. I still may have an issue with the way I'm syncing the Qflash--need take the QF-12 TTL cable out of the loop, and if you've read my other "sync" thread, you can see that I'm experiencing some rather puzzling sync issues.​
    I don't think that having the QF-12 in the loop will help either. A cable link from the TT5 should perform better. I'll look at your other sync thread as well.
     
  88. Ian said:
    Put a speedlight in your hotshoe, connect your Quantum or Dynalite by sync cable to your D3s (use either the body sync or secondary flash PC sync) and see what you get . . .​
    I put a Nikon SB-600 Speedlight, set manually at 1/64th power, in my Nikon D3s' hot-shoe. The SB-600 was pointed away from the scene and covered. I inserted the Dynalite-supplied, three-prong HH-to-PC sync cord into my D3s' PC socket. The Dynalite Uni400JR was set at full-power, shot through a small softbox. Here's what I got:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  89. Body: Nikon D3s
    Strobe: Quantum Qflash model T @ full-power; t 0.5 = 1/300th
    HSS/FP = enabled; HSS/FP begins at = 1/500th; HyperSync offset = -1,400
    [Note: re-tested with mini-to-HH sync cable from TT5 to Qflash.]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  90. Body: Nikon D3s
    Strobe: Quantum Qflash model T @ full-power; t 0.5 = 1/300th
    HSS/FP = DISABLED; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    [Note: re-tested with mini-to-HH sync cable from TT5 to Qflash.]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  91. Raph said:
    I put a Nikon SB-600 Speedlight, set manually at 1/64th power, in my Nikon D3s' hot-shoe. The SB-600 was pointed away from the scene and covered. I inserted the Dynalite-supplied, three-prong HH-to-PC sync cord into my D3s' PC socket. The Dynalite Uni400JR was set at full-power, shot through a small softbox. Here's what I got:​
    It doesn't look as though you will get much mileage from the Uni400JR judging by those results. The Quantum results don't look much better (if any) either.
    Your Force10's were giving better results from what I remember, even though they're supposed to be faster... This result looks pretty good, and doesn't appear to have the banding issues. Could the SU-800 be having some sort of affect here or is the graduation still there but more difficult to see? Just why the SU-800 ight be having an effect I don't know, but there is a significant difference judging by the results.
    Well, "beating the ambient," isn't easy! Here, I've got a 1,000 Watt-second strobe at full-power, bounced into a 60" silver umbrella only about six feet from the subject. A Nikon SB-600 (no modifier) was dialed-in via TTL using an SU-800/MiniTT1/FlexTT5, placed at about six feet to the left of camera for a backlight:​
    [​IMG]
    Nikon D3s; AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G; ISO 100; 1/8,000 @ f1.4
     
  92. Ian said:
    Could the SU-800 be having some sort of affect here or is the graduation still there but more difficult to see?​
    Ian, thanks for checking up on the thread! I believe the latter is true--the uneven illumination is likely just more difficult to detect in more real-world images. Check these two HSS/FP-disabled, HyperSync images I just shot at 1/3,200th:
    Body: Nikon D3s/TT1
    Strobe: Dynalite Uni400JR/TT5, full-power; t.5 = 1/675th + Nikon SB-600/TT5 in manual mode @ 1/32nd power.
    HSS/FP = disabled; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    [​IMG]
    1/3,200th @ f/16 uncropped
    [​IMG]
    Same image with shutter-curtain shadow cropped out.
    Also, I shot a few test images where I intentionally mis-directed the key, slightly above where I wanted it in the scene in order to "compensate" for the bottom-heavy, uneven "slitted" exposure. That technique actually worked fairly well. Also, since I'm only planning to use this technique under exterior daylight conditions, the uneven illumination should be even less noticeable when mixed with high-luminance ambient light present. While I think HyperSync is somewhat useful, it's certainly been a bit over-hyped, at least for use with a Nikon D3s.
    Certainly, a few more tests are in order (including more with the Force10 to confirm/disconfirim your hypothesis), and I plan to shoot some ambient/flash tests to see how "readable" the uneven illumination is in the types of daylight exterior shots I'm likely to be actually shooting.
     
  93. Oh, duh! The shot of the girl was actually an HSS/FP shot, not a HyperSync image. Recall that I shot no X-sync reference image for that shot (this was before I had any clue to what was actually going on with all of this). So while uneven illumination is less of a problem with HSS/FP enabled, I suffered, I believe, instead from a severe loss of recorded flash output. Again, I'll shoot more tests with the Force10, both with and without the SU-800 to confirm.
     
  94. Body: Nikon D3s/TT1
    Strobe: Dynalite Uni400JR/TT5 @ 1/8th power.
    HSS/FP = disabled; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    Here's one with some very late-afternoon daylight in the background, looking out of a window:
    [​IMG]
    1/1,000th @ f/4 (uncropped)
     
  95. Body: Nikon D3s/TT1
    Strobe: Speedotron Force 10/TT5 (power level unrecorded).
    HSS/FP = disabled; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    Daylight exterior:
    [​IMG]
    1/1,600th @ f/6.3 (uncropped)
    [​IMG]
    Same image, cropped.
     
  96. At least with this quick test with my Speedotron Force 10, I am receiving about a stop and a half more recorded flash output at shutter speeds above X-sync:
    Body: Nikon D3s/TT1
    Strobe: Speedotron Force 10/TT5 (power level unrecorded).
    HSS/FP = disabled; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    [​IMG]
    1/250th @ f/16
    [​IMG]
    1/500th @ f/11
    [​IMG]
    1/1,000th @ f/8
    [​IMG]
    1/2,000th @ f/5.6
    [​IMG]
    1/4,000th @ f/4.0
    [​IMG]
    1/8,000th @ f/2.8
     
  97. Body: Nikon D3s/TT1
    Strobe: Speedotron Force 10; t 0.5 = 1/850th @ full-power/TT5
    HSS/FP = disabled; HyperSync offset = -2,300
    [​IMG]
    1/250th @ f/16
    [​IMG]
    1/500th @ f/11
    [​IMG]
    1/1,000th @ f8
    [​IMG]
    1/2,000th @ f/5.6
    [​IMG]
    1/4,000th @ f/4.0
    [​IMG]
    1/8,000th @ f/2.8
     
  98. Body: Nikon D3s/TT1
    Strobe: Speedotron Force 10; t 0.5 = 1/850th @ full-power/TT5
    HSS/FP = enabled; HSS/FP begins at = 1/500th; HyperSync offset = -1,400
    Note: the results from HSS/FP-enabled, high-speed flash sync, employed with the Speedotron Force 10, were even less efficient than the longer flash-duration strobes tested previously. Since all frames above X-sync were about equally as dark, indicating a severe loss of recorded flash output at a t 0.5 value of 1/850th, I've posted only two samples for the sake of brevity:
    [​IMG]
    1/250th @ f/16
    [​IMG]
    1/2,000th @ f5.6
     
  99. After all the tests you've done with the Force10's it appears that there is little benefit to be obtained by using the Mini/Flex setup. Outside, your results look convincing when there is a proportion of ambient light available, although this is surprising considering the low level of that ambient.
    From all the tests you've done what are your conclusions with the equipment you've been using and what method do you think you will be employing in the future to obtain the most benefit?
     
  100. Ian said:
    After all the tests you've done with the Force10's it appears that there is little benefit to be obtained by using the Mini/Flex setup. Outside, your results look convincing when there is a proportion of ambient light available, although this is surprising considering the low level of that ambient.​
    Yes, I can't quite seem to reconcile the results of the two tests. The smaller images shot with the Force 10 and the ambient appear to gain a 1.5-stop advantage; however, the interior Force 10 tests appear to disprove that advantage. Is there a flaw in the test? A variable I haven't considered? What's different with the ambient exposures, where a clear benefit seems to have been obtained?
     
  101. Iad said:
    From all the tests you've done what are your conclusions with the equipment you've been using and what method do you think you will be employing in the future to obtain the most benefit?​
    Yes, I was about to post a summary about just that. Here's what I've concluded:
    1. The HSS/FP-enabled mode offers a single modest benefit over using an ND filter: convenience. But it comes at a cost of about a stop-and-a-half loss, when used with the longer duration flashes I own: the Qflash and Dynalite. At least this loss is constant, and doesn't increase with higher shutter speeds.
    2. The HSS/FP-disabled, HyperSync mode has a very workable range up to 1/1,000th, somewhat compromised peformance at 1/2,000th, and usable, but with some cropping, up to about 1/3,200th. Aiming the key slightly above the desired area of illumination helps "compensate" for the hot spot in the lower part of the frame when using this mode. The usefulness and efficacy of these methods are particularly dependent on the specific shot: model placement within the frame, specific areas of lighting, etc. I think this technique will be particularly useful in high-luminance ambient conditions, especially, if say, I'm lighting a full-length shot of a model, but only lighting her face with a gridded beauty dish, for example.
     
  102. I said:
    I think this technique will be particularly useful in high-luminance ambient conditions, especially, if say, I'm lighting a full-length shot of a model, but only lighting her face with a gridded beauty dish, for example.​
    I meant to say, "I think this technique will be particularly useful in high-luminance ambient conditions, especially, if say, I'm framing a full-length shot of a model, but only lighting her face with a gridded beauty dish, for example."
    In other words, in daylight exteriors, with high levels of ambient light present in the scene, HSS/FP-disabled, HyperSync is particularly applicable to such scenes where the model won't necessarily be evenly lit, from head-to-toe, by design. For example, a slash of light from a monolight, deliberately illuminating only the model's face and midriff, would "hide" the imperfect illumination from the "slitted" HyperSync flash exposure. While this may seem like an extremely limited application, it's a technique which can offer some additional benefits over shooting at X-sync.
     
  103. I have been able to HSS hack my Oly E-3 and speedotron 805 pack for years at 1,8000th with no banding. I did it back in 2008. I moved from OLY because IMO they aren't ever going to try and compete with Nikon or Canon as real player in the Pro DLR market! I had to leave and lost my HSS hack for a little while but gained a better over all system.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HK7VC80NSvw
    Link to the video I made a long time ago, but lost my HD video hosting to Snapfish and moved the video to YouTube only a year or so ago. But I made that video more than a couple of years ago.
    Oly invented HSS The call it FP mode. All you needed to do is put the camera in FP mode by putting on a hot shoe flash like the fl-36r take a shot in FP mode, slip the flash off the hot shoe and place on any trigger. All done good to go, if you have the duration. My 805's work perfect ( I have 3 of them) Oly spoiled me, it was so easy.
    No need to pay for pocket wizards Flex tt what ever, I have a bag full of PW Plus and PlusII's now I habe to buy Flex's, Hell No I refuse. I wish all camera's worked as easy as my E-3 did.
    Now I have a 7D and it is a nightmare to make this work. I refuse to pay PW more money to do a HSS hack, so I started to investigate, this is what I found.
    On a 7D this is what you do, buy a 220ex take it apart, slip in a mini photocell in the tube area, run the wires down inside the body, solder in a mini jack (3.5mm mono) and make a mini sync cable to your favorite radio trigger. On the 220ex slide the HSS switch to put the camera in HSS mode and you can trigger pack lights and mono lights with no banding. If you dont want the hot shoe installed flash to add any light, flag it with gaff tape.
    I will make a video to show the 7D in action. I have worked on this for a long time. Michael Bass was working with pocket wizard while they were developing the Flex & mini's. He spoke to me when I asked him to help me with my project when I was using the 430EXII.
    You can add a sync port on the 430EXII to trigger it off camera but you cant grab the signal to trigger a PW with the flash in HSS mode. It super imposes a weird voltage back to the camera and will only trigger the (radio trigger one time). I see that Photix, PW, and Radio popper have all figured it out.
    It is only a matter of time until you see Flea bay triggers with the ability to put a camera in HSS mode and allow you to trigger studio packs that have the proper duration's to allow the tail sync hack.
    I want to make a little cube, that let you slip in a standard radio trigger, and has a button or a switch that tricks a Canon or Nikon body into HSS mode. Then all you need is light source with the proper duration's. No need to replace all your triggers, I paid hundreds of $$$ on PW's and now they wont do what I want them to do, pisses me off.
    I always heard people cry Oly was late to the party, so it seems Oly wasn't so late to the party after all. The invented Sensor dust removal, IS, and HSS (FP mode) to bad they sold out to build Micro 4/3 cameras instead of building a real Pro DLSR or I would still be in Oly Camp instead of with my PITA 7D and dust pump thousand dollar plastic lenses. Did I mention Zuiko glass is some of the best I have ever owned namely the 35-100 f2 (still no equal)
    OK well on with your mono block, flext tt BS. What a huge waste of money when they Canon and Nikon can offer this capability with ease as part of body.
     
  104. why HyperSync?

    What are the benefits to increased shutter speeds while still being able to use your strobe? While most view HyperSync as a technique to “overpower the sun,” that’s only one of three applications where HyperSync can be useful:
    1. Increasing flash-to-ambient ratio to darken daylight exterior backgrounds.
    2. Enabling large apertures when using strobes in daylight, without using an ND filter.
    3. Employing high shutter speeds when using strobes in daylight to freeze motion.​
    I would question the validity of 1... "Increasing flash-to-ambient ratio to darken daylight exterior backgrounds."
    The physics of hypersync is to allow a faster shutter speed to be used with the SAME flash output. The SAME flash output (operating as 'ambient') is being reduced by shutter speed too.
    So where does this 'Increasing flash-to-ambient ratio' happen?
    Not with Speedlights, not with long duration flashes (except at max shutter speed - and that marginally) and not with short duration flash without banding or severe shutter curtain intrusion.
     

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