which brand of autofocus is faster?

Discussion in 'Sports' started by alwyn_loh, Nov 1, 2004.

  1. Is the CAM 2000 AF module on Nikon cameras (D2H, D2X) equal to, faster
    than, or slower than the 45 point AF on Canon Cameras (1D, 1D Mk II)?

    Assume the usage of just ONE center AF point.

    Any idea about the tracking performance of both brands?
     
  2. Both systems are worth 'crap' if the focus-on-subject is a white T-shirt, no contrast. That said, why would it matter?



    If the glass is right, the light is good, and you are ready, AF on or off should not kill the image. If you have not learned to focus on a 'spot,' i.e., the ground, and wait for the subject to cross the spot, all the AF in the world is not going to make you a better photographer. Sometimes AF is very, very good to have: other times it is not super.
    (A bride heading down the asle is often a problem for AF systems, so you just focus on a pew - turn off AF - and when the bride hits that spot, you take the photo.)
     
  3. They're very competitive. I agree with the previous poster that the more important factor is the photographer and which system works better for the photographers style. Some prefer Nikons AF and tracking over Canons and others prefer Canons.

    You could go down to a shop and check them out and try test focusing on moving cars or something or even better rent both for a weekend. Make sure you use identical lenses for each since that's a huge factor as well.
     
  4. You will find a larger selection of Canon "quick focus" USM lenses available
    compared to Nikon.
     
  5. The Canon 1d2 has two AF processors that enable even faster AF than the 1D. I doubt Nikon AF comes close to 1d2 AF perfomance.
     
  6. You can doubt it but you'd be very wrong.
     
  7. The Canon 1d2 has two AF processors that enable even faster AF than the 1D. I doubt Nikon AF comes close to 1d2 AF perfomance.
    They're pretty much the same.
     
  8. Ok actually I find the Canon a bit faster, but it's not like 2 AF processors = twice the performance.
     

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