When it all goes wrong...a photographic experience...

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by r s, Feb 4, 2007.

  1. r s

    r s

    I tried out using IR film for the first time a few weeks ago - in my Leica III (F).
    Put an old, dark-red filter on an equally old Elmar 50/3.5 and I was off to the races. I thought..

    After having loaded (and cutting) the film in a dark restroom in a cafe up in Northern California I realized I had to guesstimate the exposure as the film isn't really ISO rated. On top of that I *cough-cough* forgot to fully extend the Elmar and realized that the shutter was dragging a bit..and I may have a light leak. Life was good.

    It was fun and different in that I looked for scenes that I normally wouldn't when shooting regular B&W film but the result...well, here are some for you to 'enjoy':

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A lengthier rambling about this 'experience' and some more photos at Batteries Not Included.

    Anyone else out there who have similar photography stories - and the photos to show? :)
     
  2. keep on doing it... number 1 is amazing!

    s
     
  3. I'm looking forward to see something once you've resolved the proplem. IR photography isn't easy. I gave it up long ago.
     
  4. I have a friend who did a wedding with a lens that was not fully extended and he was a pro. He switched to a rigid model Summicron new at the time. Just sold that black rigid lens to a collector for $800.

    Although I never did IR with a screw body, I have used the lens and it is just great. The IR focus mark is correct at 5.6 with a Leica IR filter or B+W 092 or 093.

    Exposure is 1/250 at 6.3 in sun and I never bracket. If you have a M6 or R body, set ISO to 800 and meter right thru the filter. Works in sun or shade or deep shade if you observe normal rules for reflected light meters, IE do not meter white foliage or grass without compensating, same as regular film and snow.
     
  5. Rich, looks similar to some pinhole shots. IR can be a booger bear!
     
  6. Gilbert Grosvener (editor of National Geographic) kept forgetting to extend the lens on his Leica and missed many shots in the exotic places he traveled. Finally, he brought it to their new camera repairman, Marty Forsher, to devise something to remind him to extend the lens. Instead, Marty soldered it out so it couldn't be retracted. He was fired on the spot! That's when he started Professional Camera Repair, which for many years was the unquestioned premiere camera repair and equipment problem-solving facility in the world.
     
  7. Yep. The lens wasn't pulled out and screwed down right.
     
  8. Gilbert Grosvener (editor of National Geographic) kept forgetting to extend the lens on his Leica and missed many shots in the exotic places he traveled. Finally, he brought it to their new camera repairman, Marty Forsher, to devise something to remind him to extend the lens. Instead, Marty soldered it out so it couldn't be retracted. He was fired on the spot
    Those were evil, wicked times, IMHO, when the Grosveners rose from bottom-feeders to become sharks. Sure, they were the NG Society, but did things get better when they fired in the manner they did? Dunno.
    Forsher was a saint. He's the one who modified some 180mm F2.5 Nikon-S lenses to work on the F for us newspaper guys and he did so much more.
     
  9. Number one is certainly a keeper, I really like the composition. I would not not look at these as failures. You certainly know how to compose a picture.
     
  10. You didn't say which brand of IR film your shooting. If its Kodak HIE then use 1/125th at
    F11. I use the Leica IR filter and the IR focusing mark and get perfect results. Of course
    you will need to pull the lens out and if you don't do your own processing results can vary.
     
  11. Looks like you have the idea and an eye for it.

    I love IR photography. Have never had much luck useing a camera with a cloth shutter, such
    as my Leica III. Hassey and Nikon much sharper in results, though any SLR is less than ideal
    with a very dark filter.

    Sorry I have no current digitized IRs. Maybe some a little later.

    Have fun!
     
  12. r s

    r s

    Thanks for the encouraging comments.<br>
    I was using Kodak HSI film.
    <br>
    Someone mentioned the IR focusing mark on the Elmar - could someone explain a bit about how to use it when focusing?
    <br>Thanks!
     
  13. Rich, I feel with you - I blew this family shot on Christmas morning by forgetting to extend the lens. Bugger. Now where was that soldering iron again ?? :) Cheers, Soeren
    00Joy4-34809384.jpg
     
  14. Back in the forties I salvaged the 100mm?/2.0 Xenon from a defunct German aerial camera and Forscher made a coupled adapter for my old Leica III. I used it for circus photos for several years until I went broke in college and had to take an offer I couldn't refuse. Never seen anything like it since then.

    BTW: the colored spice bottle lids that I often tout for lens caps would have done old Grosvenor up brown. With one of the red ones on the lens you are not likely to forget to take it off and in doing so the lens would have been properly extended. DIY rules!
     
  15. When I didn't have a rear lens cap for my Elmar, I would stuff lens tissue inside it, before sticking it in my pocket. More than once I would forget to remove it when switching back to that lens, and not realizing it until the photos were developed!
     
  16. Very cool, Rich -
    Now all you need is a pretentious artists' statement and a gallery connection, and you can
    make a fortune!
    Matt
     
  17. r s

    r s

    I think I'll start with correctly exposed and somewhat sharp photos :)
     

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